Centraal Psychiatric Center

Amersfoort, Netherlands

Centraal Psychiatric Center

Amersfoort, Netherlands
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Berenschot F.,Centraal Psychiatric Center | Berenschot F.,Center for Child and Youth Psychiatry | Van Aken M.A.G.,University Utrecht | Van Aken M.A.G.,Center for Adolescent Psychiatry | And 5 more authors.
European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry | Year: 2014

It has been argued that a heightened emotional sensitivity interferes with the cognitive processing of facial emotion recognition and may explain the intensified emotional reactions to external emotional stimuli of adults with personality pathology, such as borderline personality disorder (BPD). This study examines if and how deviations in facial emotion recognition also occur in adolescents with personality pathology. Forty-two adolescents with personality pathology, 111 healthy adolescents and 28 psychiatric adolescents without personality pathology completed the Emotion Recognition Task, measuring their accuracy and sensitivity in recognizing positive and negative emotion expressions presented in several, morphed, expression intensities. Adolescents with personality pathology showed an enhanced recognition accuracy of facial emotion expressions compared to healthy adolescents and clients with various Axis-I psychiatric diagnoses. They were also more sensitive to less intensive expressions of emotions than clients with various Axis-I psychiatric diagnoses, but not more than healthy adolescents. As has been shown in research on adults with BPD, adolescents with personality pathology show enhanced facial emotion recognition. © 2013 Springer-Verlag.


Roke Y.,Centraal Psychiatric Center | Buitelaar J.K.,Donders Institute for Brain | Boot A.M.,University of Groningen | Tenback D.,Centraal Psychiatric Center | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology | Year: 2012

Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the long-term treatment effects of risperidone on prolactin levels and prolactin-related side effects in pubertal boys with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and disruptive behavior disorders (DBD). Method: Physical healthy 10-20-year-old males with ASD (n=89) and/or DBD (n=9) chronically treated (mean 52 months, range 16-126 months) with risperidone (group 1, n=51) or not treated with any antipsychotic (group 2, n=47) were recruited to this observational study from the child psychiatry outpatient clinic. Morning non-fasting serum prolactin levels were measured and prolactin-related side effects were assessed by means of questionnaires and physical examination. Group differences were tested with Student's t, χ2, Fisher exact, and Mann-Whitney tests, and logistic regression analysis, according to the type and distribution of data. Results: Hyperprolactinemia was present in 47% of subjects in group 1 but only in 2% of subjects in group 2 (odds ratio 71.9; 95% CI, 7.7; 676.3). Forty-six percent of subjects in group1 had asymptomatic hyperprolactinemia. Current risperidone dose and 9-OH risperidone plasma level were significant predictors of hyperprolactinemia (p=0.035 and p=0.03, respectively). Gynecomastia and sexual dysfunction were present in 43% and 14% of the subjects in group1, respectively, compared with 21% and 0% of subjects in group 2 (p=0.05 and p=0.01). Gynecomastia was not significantly associated with hyperprolactinemia. Conclusions: Hyperprolactinemia is a common side effect in young males treated over the long term with risperidone. Young males treated with risperidone are more likely to report diminished sexual functioning than are those not treated with antipsychotics. © 2012, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

Loading Centraal Psychiatric Center collaborators
Loading Centraal Psychiatric Center collaborators