PSR

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: www.rdmag.com

Researchers at UC Riverside's Akbari lab have brought a new strain of red-eyed mutant wasps into the world. The wasps were created to prove that CRISPR gene-slicing technology can be used successfully on the tiny parasitic jewel wasps, giving scientists a new way to study some of the wasp's interesting biology, such as how males can convert all their progeny into males by using selfish genetic elements. No one knows how that selfish genetic element in some male wasps "can somehow kill the female embryos and create only males," said Omar Akbari, an assistant professor of entomology who led the research team. "To understand that, we need to pursue their PSR (paternal sex ratio) chromosomes, perhaps by mutating regions of the PSR chromosome to determine which genes are essential for its functionality." Enter the relatively new CRISPR technology, which allows scientists to inject components like RNA and proteins into an organism with instructions to find, cut and mutate a specific piece of DNA. Then researchers can see how disrupting that DNA affects the organism. The end goal, in Akbari's case, is to better understand the biology of wasps and other insects, so they can find a way to control insects that destroy crops or spread diseases like malaria. But the first step is figuring out how to use the CRISPR technology in such a small organism, something no one had ever done before, in large part because the work is pretty daunting, Akbari said. This is because jewel wasps lay their tiny eggs inside a blowfly pupa, which had to be peeled back to expose the teensy eggs. How tiny? Imagine the blowfly egg sac as about the size of a small bean, Akbari said, and Jewel wasp eggs "about a quarter the size of a grain of rice....You're essentially pulling a small egg out of a larger egg, injecting it with components to mutate the DNA and then putting it back into the bigger egg to develop." In the case of Akbari's mutant wasps, the team decided to slice the genes that control the color of the wasp's normally black eyes. "We wanted to target a gene that would be obvious, and we knew from previous studies that if the gene for eye pigmentation was knocked out, they would have red eyes, so this seemed like a good target for gene disruption," Akbari said. "Big beautiful red eyes are something you won't miss." But creating that disruption took some doing--well, a lot of doing, Akbari said. "You have to use a very-very fine needle and a microscope and individually inject hundred to thousands of embryos, but in the end, we developed a protocol that can be used to cut the DNA in this organism and we showed that it works." The technique is challenging, Akbari said, "but it is learnable. You need a really steady hand and it requires a lot of patience in micro manipulation that one can learn over time. Ming Li, a postdoctoral researcher in our lab has mastered the technique." And those scarlet-orbed wasps? They won't be going away anytime soon. The cuts in the DNA created a mutant wasp with heritable traits, which means those red eyes will be passed down to all their offspring in the future - an important quality for researchers who are looking for a stable line of insects to study.


News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: www.chromatographytechniques.com

Researchers at UC Riverside's Akbari lab have brought a new strain of red-eyed mutant wasps into the world. The wasps were created to prove that CRISPR gene-slicing technology can be used successfully on the tiny parasitic jewel wasps, giving scientists a new way to study some of the wasp's interesting biology, such as how males can convert all their progeny into males by using selfish genetic elements. No one knows how that selfish genetic element in some male wasps "can somehow kill the female embryos and create only males," said Omar Akbari, an assistant professor of entomology who led the research team. "To understand that, we need to pursue their PSR (paternal sex ratio) chromosomes, perhaps by mutating regions of the PSR chromosome to determine which genes are essential for its functionality." Enter the relatively new CRISPR technology, which allows scientists to inject components like RNA and proteins into an organism with instructions to find, cut and mutate a specific piece of DNA. Then researchers can see how disrupting that DNA affects the organism. The end goal, in Akbari's case, is to better understand the biology of wasps and other insects, so they can find a way to control insects that destroy crops or spread diseases like malaria. But the first step is figuring out how to use the CRISPR technology in such a small organism, something no one had ever done before, in large part because the work is pretty daunting, Akbari said. This is because jewel wasps lay their tiny eggs inside a blowfly pupa, which had to be peeled back to expose the teensy eggs. How tiny? Imagine the blowfly egg sac as about the size of a small bean, Akbari said, and Jewel wasp eggs "about a quarter the size of a grain of rice....You're essentially pulling a small egg out of a larger egg, injecting it with components to mutate the DNA and then putting it back into the bigger egg to develop." In the case of Akbari's mutant wasps, the team decided to slice the genes that control the color of the wasp's normally black eyes. "We wanted to target a gene that would be obvious, and we knew from previous studies that if the gene for eye pigmentation was knocked out, they would have red eyes, so this seemed like a good target for gene disruption," Akbari said. "Big beautiful red eyes are something you won't miss." But creating that disruption took some doing--well, a lot of doing, Akbari said. "You have to use a very-very fine needle and a microscope and individually inject hundred to thousands of embryos, but in the end, we developed a protocol that can be used to cut the DNA in this organism and we showed that it works." The technique is challenging, Akbari said, "but it is learnable. You need a really steady hand and it requires a lot of patience in micro manipulation that one can learn over time. Ming Li, a postdoctoral researcher in our lab has mastered the technique." And those scarlet-orbed wasps? They won't be going away anytime soon. The cuts in the DNA created a mutant wasp with heritable traits, which means those red eyes will be passed down to all their offspring in the future - an important quality for researchers who are looking for a stable line of insects to study.


News Article | April 20, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

Have you ever found yourself looking at a regular, garden variety wasp and wishing that it looked more like the kind of sinister nightmare creature that would give H.R. Giger sleepless nights? If the answer to that is a resounding “no,” then chances are that you don’t work in the University of California, Riverside’s Akbari lab. That’s because researchers at said lab recently introduced the world to a new strain of red-eyed mutant wasp — courtesy of its experiments with cutting edge CRISPR gene-splicing technology. “We used CRISPR/Cas9 to generate mutations in the DNA of an important model organism, the parastoid wasp nasonia vitripennis,” Omar Akbari, the assistant professor of entomology who led the research, told Digital Trends. “This is exciting as it gives researchers a tool for the first time to mutate genes of interest, allowing researchers to study the interesting biology of this organism.” As the research paper, published in the journal Nature, reveals, the red eyes were the result of injecting wasp eggs with the Cas9 DNA mixtures, and then transferring them back to the host. Because the modifications were made to the DNA itself, the red eyes are heritable — and will therefore be passed down to any and all offspring in the future. But why make red-eyed mutant wasps at all? As it turns out, there’s a good reason for it — and it’s not that Akbari is a mad scientist who wants to hold the world for ransom with his swarm army of genetically engineered killer wasps. (Well, as far as we know it isn’t!) “We wanted to test the efficiency of the CRISPR/Cas9 system using a phenotype that would be easy to visualize,” he said. As to what’s next, Akbari said the plan is now to use the protocol for generating gene mutations to study a naturally existing selfish chromosome present in some wasp populations, called the paternal sex ratio disorder (PSR). “We hope to generate specific mutations in this chromosome to help understand the mechanism by which PSR acts,” he continued. Ultimately, the goal is to find a way to better control wasps and other insects to help prevent them destroying crops and spreading diseases, such as malaria. Hey, if red-eyed wasps can help with that, then we’re all for it!


News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: www.rdmag.com

Researchers at UC Riverside's Akbari lab have brought a new strain of red-eyed mutant wasps into the world. The wasps were created to prove that CRISPR gene-slicing technology can be used successfully on the tiny parasitic jewel wasps, giving scientists a new way to study some of the wasp's interesting biology, such as how males can convert all their progeny into males by using selfish genetic elements. No one knows how that selfish genetic element in some male wasps "can somehow kill the female embryos and create only males," said Omar Akbari, an assistant professor of entomology who led the research team. "To understand that, we need to pursue their PSR (paternal sex ratio) chromosomes, perhaps by mutating regions of the PSR chromosome to determine which genes are essential for its functionality." Enter the relatively new CRISPR technology, which allows scientists to inject components like RNA and proteins into an organism with instructions to find, cut and mutate a specific piece of DNA. Then researchers can see how disrupting that DNA affects the organism. The end goal, in Akbari's case, is to better understand the biology of wasps and other insects, so they can find a way to control insects that destroy crops or spread diseases like malaria. But the first step is figuring out how to use the CRISPR technology in such a small organism, something no one had ever done before, in large part because the work is pretty daunting, Akbari said. This is because jewel wasps lay their tiny eggs inside a blowfly pupa, which had to be peeled back to expose the teensy eggs. How tiny? Imagine the blowfly egg sac as about the size of a small bean, Akbari said, and Jewel wasp eggs "about a quarter the size of a grain of rice....You're essentially pulling a small egg out of a larger egg, injecting it with components to mutate the DNA and then putting it back into the bigger egg to develop." In the case of Akbari's mutant wasps, the team decided to slice the genes that control the color of the wasp's normally black eyes. "We wanted to target a gene that would be obvious, and we knew from previous studies that if the gene for eye pigmentation was knocked out, they would have red eyes, so this seemed like a good target for gene disruption," Akbari said. "Big beautiful red eyes are something you won't miss." But creating that disruption took some doing--well, a lot of doing, Akbari said. "You have to use a very-very fine needle and a microscope and individually inject hundred to thousands of embryos, but in the end, we developed a protocol that can be used to cut the DNA in this organism and we showed that it works." The technique is challenging, Akbari said, "but it is learnable. You need a really steady hand and it requires a lot of patience in micro manipulation that one can learn over time. Ming Li, a postdoctoral researcher in our lab has mastered the technique." And those scarlet-orbed wasps? They won't be going away anytime soon. The cuts in the DNA created a mutant wasp with heritable traits, which means those red eyes will be passed down to all their offspring in the future - an important quality for researchers who are looking for a stable line of insects to study.


News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

IMAGE:  The red-eyed mutant Jewel wasp, seen on the right, was created in the lab using CRISPR technology. An unmodified Jewel wasp is seen on the left. view more RIVERSIDE, Calif. (http://www. )-- Researchers at UC Riverside's Akbari lab have brought a new strain of red-eyed mutant wasps into the world. The wasps were created to prove that CRISPR gene-slicing technology can be used successfully on the tiny parasitic jewel wasps, giving scientists a new way to study some of the wasp's interesting biology, such as how males can convert all their progeny into males by using selfish genetic elements. No one knows how that selfish genetic element in some male wasps "can somehow kill the female embryos and create only males," said Omar Akbari, an assistant professor of entomology who led the research team. "To understand that, we need to pursue their PSR (paternal sex ratio) chromosomes, perhaps by mutating regions of the PSR chromosome to determine which genes are essential for its functionality." Enter the relatively new CRISPR technology, which allows scientists to inject components like RNA and proteins into an organism with instructions to find, cut and mutate a specific piece of DNA. Then researchers can see how disrupting that DNA affects the organism. The end goal, in Akbari's case, is to better understand the biology of wasps and other insects, so they can find a way to control insects that destroy crops or spread diseases like malaria. But the first step is figuring out how to use the CRISPR technology in such a small organism, something no one had ever done before, in large part because the work is pretty daunting, Akbari said. This is because jewel wasps lay their tiny eggs inside a blowfly pupa, which had to be peeled back to expose the teensy eggs. How tiny? Imagine the blowfly egg sac as about the size of a small bean, Akbari said, and Jewel wasp eggs "about a quarter the size of a grain of rice....You're essentially pulling a small egg out of a larger egg, injecting it with components to mutate the DNA and then putting it back into the bigger egg to develop." In the case of Akbari's mutant wasps, the team decided to slice the genes that control the color of the wasp's normally black eyes. "We wanted to target a gene that would be obvious, and we knew from previous studies that if the gene for eye pigmentation was knocked out, they would have red eyes, so this seemed like a good target for gene disruption," Akbari said. "Big beautiful red eyes are something you won't miss." But creating that disruption took some doing--well, a lot of doing, Akbari said. "You have to use a very-very fine needle and a microscope and individually inject hundred to thousands of embryos, but in the end, we developed a protocol that can be used to cut the DNA in this organism and we showed that it works." The technique is challenging, Akbari said, "but it is learnable. You need a really steady hand and it requires a lot of patience in micro manipulation that one can learn over time. Ming Li, a postdoctoral researcher in our lab has mastered the technique." And those scarlet-orbed wasps? They won't be going away anytime soon. The cuts in the DNA created a mutant wasp with heritable traits, which means those red eyes will be passed down to all their offspring in the future - an important quality for researchers who are looking for a stable line of insects to study. The results were just published in Nature's Scientific Reports in an article called "Generation of heritable germline mutations in the jewel wasp Nasonia vitripennis using CRISPR/Cas9." Besides Akbari, the authors include Li, Abigail Chong and Bradley J. White of UCR and Lauren Yun Cook Au, Deema Douglah and Patrick M. Ferree from Claremont McKenna College in Claremont. The research was supported by UCR startup funds.


News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: phys.org

The wasps were created to prove that CRISPR gene-slicing technology can be used successfully on the tiny parasitic jewel wasps, giving scientists a new way to study some of the wasp's interesting biology, such as how males can convert all their progeny into males by using selfish genetic elements. No one knows how that selfish genetic element in some male wasps "can somehow kill the female embryos and create only males," said Omar Akbari, an assistant professor of entomology who led the research team. "To understand that, we need to pursue their PSR (paternal sex ratio) chromosomes, perhaps by mutating regions of the PSR chromosome to determine which genes are essential for its functionality." Enter the relatively new CRISPR technology, which allows scientists to inject components like RNA and proteins into an organism with instructions to find, cut and mutate a specific piece of DNA. Then researchers can see how disrupting that DNA affects the organism. The end goal, in Akbari's case, is to better understand the biology of wasps and other insects, so they can find a way to control insects that destroy crops or spread diseases like malaria. But the first step is figuring out how to use the CRISPR technology in such a small organism, something no one had ever done before, in large part because the work is pretty daunting, Akbari said. This is because jewel wasps lay their tiny eggs inside a blowfly pupa, which had to be peeled back to expose the teensy eggs. How tiny? Imagine the blowfly egg sac as about the size of a small bean, Akbari said, and Jewel wasp eggs "about a quarter the size of a grain of rice....You're essentially pulling a small egg out of a larger egg, injecting it with components to mutate the DNA and then putting it back into the bigger egg to develop." In the case of Akbari's mutant wasps, the team decided to slice the genes that control the color of the wasp's normally black eyes. "We wanted to target a gene that would be obvious, and we knew from previous studies that if the gene for eye pigmentation was knocked out, they would have red eyes, so this seemed like a good target for gene disruption," Akbari said. "Big beautiful red eyes are something you won't miss." But creating that disruption took some doing—well, a lot of doing, Akbari said. "You have to use a very-very fine needle and a microscope and individually inject hundred to thousands of embryos, but in the end, we developed a protocol that can be used to cut the DNA in this organism and we showed that it works." The technique is challenging, Akbari said, "but it is learnable. You need a really steady hand and it requires a lot of patience in micro manipulation that one can learn over time. Ming Li, a postdoctoral researcher in our lab has mastered the technique." And those scarlet-orbed wasps? They won't be going away anytime soon. The cuts in the DNA created a mutant wasp with heritable traits, which means those red eyes will be passed down to all their offspring in the future - an important quality for researchers who are looking for a stable line of insects to study. The results were just published in Nature's Scientific Reports in an article called "Generation of heritable germline mutations in the jewel wasp Nasonia vitripennis using CRISPR/Cas9."


News Article | April 18, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

A coalition of South Los Angeles (SLA) community organizations will mark the 25th anniversary of the 1992 SLA Uprising with a mass mobilization that includes a rally, march, and community festival on Saturday, April 29, beginning at the historic intersection of Florence and Normandie where the 1992 Uprising ignited. The event is part of a larger alliance between more than 35 SLA organizations implementing community-led solutions to systemic injustices and ensuring that community’s vision for the future of SLA is realized. The event will include speeches by several prominent community leaders, activists and youth from South Los Angeles, a drum invocation by Jishinbalki, Mama Nay Nay's, Cuauhtemoc & DJ Sloe Poke and musical guests Mariachi Arcoiris, Al Jackson, Josef Leimburg, Cuicani, DJ Phatrick, Medusa, Los Rakas. United under the Solidarity Statement: “South LA is the Future: A Community Vision for a healthy and just future of Los Angeles,” the group of organizations, health care providers, schools, government agencies, residents, and youth are highlighting issues, from law enforcement suppression, housing insecurity economic divestment and environmental racism, that contributed to the 1992 social rebellion and persist today, and promoting community-driven policy innovations. “Between the 1965 Uprising and 1992, conditions of structural racism that led to the rebellions, remained in place,” said Pete White, founder and co-director of Los Angeles Community Action Network. Once a vibrant neighborhood with black-owned businesses and factory jobs, SLA suffered decades of deindustrialization, disinvestment and wayward policy decisions stifled growth and development. Beyond a loss of jobs, welfare reform, the 1994 Federal Crime Bill, NAFTA and now gentrification exacerbated conditions that created community tension and hopelessness. “This was not a riot but an uprising against a system that is working against you.” The community partners initially came together through the South Los Angeles Building Healthy Communities (SLA BHC) collaborative, a group of diverse partners working to make SLA a healthier place to live, work, and play. Building Healthy Communities (BHC) is a 10-year, $1 billion comprehensive community initiative launched by the California Endowment in 2010 to advance statewide policy, change the narrative, and transform 14 of California’s communities most devastated by health inequities into places where all people have an opportunity to thrive. Tamu Jones, program officer for SLA BHC, says community organizing there is fairly sophisticated and advanced – and is recognized even nationally in terms of building movements and innovating in policy solutions. “Over the past 25 years, the people of South LA have developed models of community building to address the root causes of social unrest and health disparities,” said Jones. “They are creative and resilient and self directed. Their innovation in community organizing is built on the larger social justice movement that folks in SLA have been engaged in for decades. It is bigger than the 35 organizations and has great implications for the whole city and even beyond.” Last month, the SLA BHC coalition gathered at a Town Hall meeting as a reunion of their collective commitment and celebration to multi-racial organizing. Beyond the April 29 event, the community partners aim to challenge unjust public policies and to build a process for ongoing political education. A central component of the movement is working to uplift the stories about the 1992 LA Uprising and create a more authentic narrative that captures the creativity and resilience within the diverse communities. “Too often narratives of South Los Angeles are marked by its deficits and what its residents don’t have,” said Lola Smallwood Cuevas, director of the Los Angeles Black Worker Center. “SLA reflects one of LA’s greatest assets. Located here are residents with a rich history of struggle and innovative approaches that have worked to bridge deep and wide economic and racial divides. Look at the positives coming out of the area. Residents who have solutions for how to solve the housing crisis, people taking over housing; black workers with successful strategies for increasing access to quality jobs in construction and other growth industries. Like so many innovative sectors of Los Angeles. SLA is a socio-economic innovative laboratory that’s using transformative practices from the bottom up. It comes out of a lot of struggles and harm that residents are repairing.” A New Way of Life Advancement Project Alliance of Californians for Community Empowerment (ACCE) Brotherhood Crusade CADRE CDTech Community Coalition (CoCo) Community Health Councils (CHC) Dignity & Power Now (DPN) Esperanza Community Housing Corporation Genders & Sexualities Alliance Network (GSA Network) LA Commons Labor/Community Strategy Center (LCSC) Legal Aid Foundation of Los Angeles (LAFLA) Los Angeles Black Worker Center (LA BWC) Los Angeles Community Action Network (LA CAN) Los Angeles Metropolitan Churches (LAM) Los Angeles Neighborhood Land Trust (LANLT) Physicians for Social Responsibility-Los Angeles (PSR-LA) Southside Coalition of Community Health Centers St. John’s Well Child & Family Center Strategic Actions for a Just Economy (SAJE) Strategic Concepts in Organizing & Policy Education (SCOPE) T.R.U.S.T. South LA UMMA Community Clinic Youth Justice Coalition (YJC)


News Article | April 28, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

Astronomers say they have discovered a hidden black hole in the Milky Way galaxy, one that has a mass 7,500 times greater than the sun. The University of Manchester announced the finding, which is in the constellation Sagittarius, about 26,000 light years away from us. There’s a cluster of old stars there and the astronomers say a medium-sized black hole is at its center. Orbiting the black hole is a pulsar — the highly dense remains of a once-massive star that rotates super quickly and emits electromagnetic radiation. They are often compared to lighthouses, for the same reason they are called pulsars: They appear to blink or pulse in the night sky. In the case of the pulsar PSR B1820-30A orbiting the newly found black hole, it completes a rotation in just milliseconds. “Pulsars like PSR B1820-30A act as fantastically accurate clocks and allow us to determine precisely their distance from the Earth,” Manchester professor Andrew Lyne said in the university statement. “The pulsar is therefore very sensitive to any motion arising from the gravity of other nearby massive objects, such as black holes.” Scientists already knew about the pulsar, but getting evidence of the black hole means the pulsar has become the first to be confirmed orbiting one, the university said. And any finding of an intermediate-sized black hole is crucial because it is a “missing link” on the scale of black holes, which has stellar-mass black holes on the small end and supermassive black holes on the large end. “It is generally thought that they could be formed by the direct collapse of very massive primordial stars or successive mergers of stellar-mass black holes and runaway collisions in dense young star clusters,” Manchester’s Benetge Perera said in the statement. “This discovery provides important input to our understanding of how intermediate-mass black holes and the [star] clusters themselves form and evolve.” Scientists believe black holes form when stars collapse, which would explain why they have such high masses in such compact spaces. That density creates a gravitational pull that’s so strong, not even light can escape its grasp. If a human were to come into contact with one, it would rip you into trillions of pieces. They may sound hard to miss, but astronomers are finding new ones all the time and learning more about them. A team recently found three supermassive black holes at the centers of tiny galaxies in the constellation Virgo. The galaxies are known as ultracompact dwarf galaxies, and are probably all that is left of much larger systems that were eaten up and destroyed by collisions with other galaxies — a common occurrence in outer space. After these discoveries, scientists now think a supermassive black hole at the center of a small galaxy is also common. Two Supermassive Black Holes Found In Remains of Destroyed Galaxies How a Black Hole Would Kill You in Space


News Article | May 5, 2017
Site: www.gizmag.com

There's an entire universe of weird and wonderful exoplanets out there, and New Atlas is rounding up some of the most bizarre (Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech) For a long time, Earth was the weirdest planet we knew about. In our little corner of the universe, where Mercury is the hot one, Jupiter is the protective bigger brother, and Pluto is the one we kicked out of the club for breaking the rules, Earth is the crazy cat lady, hoarding billions of life forms. But over the last 20 years the family has expanded to include over 3,600 exoplanets, and some of these distant relatives are far more unusual than we could've imagined. There are planets where it rains rocks, planets where the wind whips around at seven times the speed of sound and planets where one year can last almost a million years. Suddenly Earth seems pretty boring, so let's take a quick tour of some of the most bizarre exoplanets that have been spotted so far. With a name like a cat walking across a keyboard, OGLE-2016-BLG-1195Lb is about the same mass as Earth and orbits at roughly the same distance from its star. But that's where the similarities end: its host star is so dim that scientists can't decide whether it should even be classified as a star. As a result, it's giving OGLE the cold shoulder, meaning the planet is probably chillier than Pluto. Way up the other end of the temperature scale sits the balmy, Venus-like GJ 1132b. In the near future, this exoplanet might hold the honor of being the first planet (outside of Earth, of course) that we detect to have gaseous oxygen in its atmosphere. Unfortunately, that doesn't mean it's life-friendly: a runaway greenhouse effect means this steamy atmosphere would be hot enough to melt the rocky surface, creating oceans of magma. It may look huge and imposing, but KELT 11b is just a big softie at heart. Despite being 40 percent bigger than Jupiter, it only has about a fifth of its mass, giving it the density of styrofoam. Orbiting a bright yellow subgiant sun once every five days, this mega marshmallow will continue to roast for the next hundred million years, before the star swallows it up. Another gas giant, HAT-P-7b is tidally locked to its star, meaning half is forever stuck in scorching sunlight at about 2,600° C (4,700° F), while the other is bathed in eternal night. That creates wild winds that quickly carry clouds around the planet – clouds which, we might add, are made of rubies and sapphires. Ruby and sapphire clouds are impressive, but in terms of bling, a planet orbiting the pulsar PSR J1719-1438 has it beat. Mostly made of oxygen and carbon, the planet is fairly small but incredibly dense, and that means it probably takes on a crystalline structure – so the entire planet (or at least part of it) could be one huge diamond. That's just a small selection, but with the number of exoplanets discovered growing almost daily, we can't wait to see what other planetary surprises the universe throws up in the future.


News Article | May 24, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

CHICAGO--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Littelfuse, Inc., the global leader in circuit protection, expands its award-winning line of high-speed fuses for protection of power semiconductor devices used in industrial equipment. The POWR-SPEED® PSR Series line of square body fuses combine extreme current limitation, excellent cycling capability, and low watt-loss design in a direct bus-bar mount construction with blown fuse indication included. The square body design accommodates high current ratings with enhanced DC performance in a smaller footprint than the traditional round body style of high-speed fuses. “DC applications such as energy storage, electric vehicle charging stations, and uninterruptible power supplies (UPS) are increasing and the manufacturers of these products have a growing need for better DC protection of their system components,” explains Craig Greeson, product manager, power fuses at Littelfuse. “The POWR-SPEED® PSR Series has the best DC protection performance available in the market today.” Key benefits of the new PSR Series include: The expanded line includes a voltage range of 550VAC to 1300VAC, 500VDC to 1000VDC. Current ratings range from 125 to 2000A and interrupt ratings are 200kA AC and 150kA DC. These fuses are used in many applications including power conversion equipment, low and medium voltage drives, DC common bus protection, battery protection, power supplies, and industrial heaters. Technical data and application support are available on-line at www.littelfuse.com/powerspeed or by calling our technical support line at 1-800-832-3873. Design engineers looking for a customized fuse design are encouraged to contact the Littelfuse Application Support Team. Founded in 1927, Littelfuse is the world leader in circuit protection with growing global platforms in power controls and sensing. The company serves customers in the electronics, automotive and industrial markets with technologies including fuses, semiconductors, polymers, ceramics, relays and sensors. Littelfuse has over 10,000 employees in more than 40 locations throughout the Americas, Europe and Asia. For more information, please visit the Littelfuse website: littelfuse.com.

Loading PSR collaborators
Loading PSR collaborators