Proven Technology Inc.

Proven, United States

Proven Technology Inc.

Proven, United States
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Slawska R.,Proven Technology Inc.
Plastics Technology | Year: 2012

Bob Slawska suggests that injection molders need to review mold requirements before buying a press machine. A molder needs to first review all the different types of molds that will be run in that machine. Some molds will require a completely different sequence of operation to produce the part and some of the mold mounting sizes will be different due to outrigger cylinders beyond the mold. A molder needs to ensure when conducting such a review that he or she categorizes the size of the molds along with any attached outriggers, the tonnage required to pinch the parison and hold the molds closed during the blow cycle, and whether the molder will need to mount additional spacer stand-offs on the platen faces to equalize clamp tonnage over the platen surface. Bob Slawska suggests that it is better to buy a press larger when considering new equipment.


Slawska B.,Proven Technology Inc.
Plastics Technology | Year: 2010

A comparison between old and latest technologies in industrial blow molding process is discussed. In the olden days, material and color changeover times ranged from 8 hr to several days depending on the color and material, poor head designs led to machine downtime and expensive repairs, and long periods of downtime were spent just waiting for the service tech to arrive to begin to solve the problem. Previously, cycle times depended on a combination of parison drop time, press closing time, blow time, exhaust (vent) time, decompression time, clamp opening, gate opening, manual part removal, gate closing, clamp moving to pre-close position. Presently, machine manuals can now be made viewed on the machine operator's computer screen. Automated part takeout has now become a standard component of the blow molding machine. Automation gives a consistent cycle time. Molds are now designed with quick- change connections for water, air, and hydraulics.


Slawska B.,Proven Technology Inc.
Plastics Technology | Year: 2011

Some of the factors that need to be considered by a part manufacturer when making a part for the first time are discussed. A part manufacturer needs to estimate the length of parison required and measure the mold length and the distance from face of the tooling mandrel to the top of the mold. The manufacturer also needs to determine the additional parison length below the bottom of the mold required for pre-pinch, blow-pin stand, and parison spreader. Experience is important when determining the actual length of the parison for a new mold and part design. It is also essential to check the finished weight of the part and measure its wall thickness in critical areas. The parison also needs to be long enough to allow pinch bars to seal the parison bottom and clear the mold.


Slawska R.,Proven Technology Inc.
Plastics Technology | Year: 2011

Most processors spend a lot of time defining what should be included in their new blow molding machine. Most often, the basic blow stand is made to serve limited functions such as blow-pin up/down and air on/off. Other functions such as pre-pinch/pre-blow and parison spread are usually put on the bottom blow frame in order to become part of the basic blow stand. The parison spreader is normally used in conjunction with the pre-pinch. The system utilizes four vertical jacks with couplings and shafting between each jack unit. Miter boxes are also used to allow proper up/down movement of all four jacks. This becomes a very stable frame to handle the forces created during the neck compacting functions. Once the mold starts to open, the bottom blow pin is used to help demold the parts from the cavities on the bottom, along with the takeout device gripping the upper portion of the parts. Spreader pins also work well when used with the pre-pinch unit. The spreader pins can be used under or over the pinch plates.


Slawska R.,Proven Technology Inc.
Plastics Technology | Year: 2011

Bob Sawska shares on some of the tooling requirements that need to be considered for accumulator-head blow molding machines. There are two categories of head tooling, such as diverge and converge. Diverge is used for larger parison diameters, while converge head tooling makes a range of smaller parisons within the same head. Users of diverge tooling experience less parison curtaining or vertical fold-overs in comparison with those running converge tools. Diverge tools require more force to program, as there is more area for the plastic to push against. This can require more force or larger shoot cylinders, which can create the need for a larger program cylinder to keep the system in balance. These tools also require finer programming of the differential angle between bushing and mandrel. Head tools have an annulus gap between the bushing and the mandrel in the land-length area regardless of type, which need to be set up for thick or thin wall distributions as the parison is purged from the tooling.


Slawska R.A.,Proven Technology Inc.
Society of Plastics Engineers - 27th Annual Blow Molding Conference, ABC 2011 | Year: 2011

The presentation will include an overview of: • How Blow Stands factor into use with Industrial Blow Molding Machines • How these units make processing more reliable and efficient • How they are designed to provide rapid changeovers and set-up times.

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