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Kzhyshkowska J.,University of Heidelberg | Kzhyshkowska J.,Red Cross | Kzhyshkowska J.,Tomsk State University | Gudima A.,University of Heidelberg | And 6 more authors.
Journal of Leukocyte Biology | Year: 2015

Implants, transplants, and implantable biomedical devices are mainstream solutions for a wide variety of human pathologies. One of the persistent problems around nondegradable metallic and polymeric implants is failure of macrophages to resolve the inflammation and their tendency to stay in a state, named “frustrated phagocytosis.” During the initial phase, proinflammatory macrophages induce acute reactions to trauma and foreign materials, whereas tolerogenic anti-inflammatory macrophages control resolution of inflammation and induce the subsequent healing stage. However, implanted materials can induce a mixed pro/ anti-inflammatory phenotype, supporting chronic inflammatory reactions accompanied by microbial contamination and resulting in implant failure. Several materials based on natural polymers for improved interaction with host tissue or surfaces that release anti-inflammatory drugs/bioactive agents have been developed for implant coating to reduce implant rejection. However, no definitive, long-term solution to avoid adverse immune responses to the implanted materials is available to date. The prevention of implant-associated infections or chronic inflammation by manipulating the macrophage phenotype is a promising strategy to improve implant acceptance. The immunomodulatory properties of currently available implant coatings need to be improved to develop personalized therapeutic solutions. Human primary macrophages exposed to the implantable materials ex vivo can be used to predict the individual’s reactions and allow selection of an optimal coating composition. Our review describes current understanding of the mechanisms of macrophage interactions with implantable materials and outlines the prospects for use of human primary macrophages for diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to personalized implant therapy. © Society for Leukocyte Biology. Source


Debry C.,Faculte Of Chirurgie Dentaireuniversite Of Strasbourg | Dupret-Bories A.,Hopitaux Universitaires Of Strasbourg | Vrana N.E.,Protip SAS | Hemar P.,Hopitaux Universitaires Of Strasbourg | And 2 more authors.
Head and Neck | Year: 2014

Background: Most patients perceive total laryngectomy as a mutilation carrying with it a loss of physical and psychological integrity. Thus, an artificial larynx system that can replace the laryngeal functions would significantly improve the quality of life for the afflicted patients. Methods: This report, with accompanying video, presents the first case in an ongoing clinical trial of laryngeal rehabilitation using an artificial larynx after total laryngectomy for squamous cell carcinoma, for an 8-month follow-up period. We depict the prosthesis' features, our 2-step surgical procedure, and the outcome. The prosthesis is formed of 2 parts: (1) a tracheal prosthesis with a porous titanium junction with trachea, which was implanted in the first step to ensure its colonization, and (2) a removable part composed of concentric valves that enable inhalation and exhalation. The second part was implanted endoscopically. The implant was monitored with a retrograde nasofibroscopy of the tracheal prosthesis lumen and CT scans over a course of 8 months. Results: The patient's functioning in the relevant postoperative problem areas, such as swallowing, breathing, and smelling, has significantly improved. The patient was able to talk in a whispering fashion while the tracheostomy was temporarily closed. The implant's porous part was in the process of being colonized by the surrounding tissue and no fistulas were observed as evidenced by barium swallow. Conclusion: As the current case shows, tracheotomy closure can be performed, and laryngeal functions are restored, by means of an implant. With further improvements, this system can alleviate the need for a permanent tracheostomy after total laryngectomy, while maintaining important larynx functions intact. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Source


Debry C.,French Institute of Health and Medical Research | Debry C.,University of Strasbourg | Debry C.,Hopitaux Universitaires Of Strasbourg | Dupret-Bories A.,French Institute of Health and Medical Research | And 7 more authors.
Head and Neck | Year: 2014

Background Most patients perceive total laryngectomy as a mutilation carrying with it a loss of physical and psychological integrity. Thus, an artificial larynx system that can replace the laryngeal functions would significantly improve the quality of life for the afflicted patients. Methods This report, with accompanying video, presents the first case in an ongoing clinical trial of laryngeal rehabilitation using an artificial larynx after total laryngectomy for squamous cell carcinoma, for an 8-month follow-up period. We depict the prosthesis' features, our 2-step surgical procedure, and the outcome. The prosthesis is formed of 2 parts: (1) a tracheal prosthesis with a porous titanium junction with trachea, which was implanted in the first step to ensure its colonization, and (2) a removable part composed of concentric valves that enable inhalation and exhalation. The second part was implanted endoscopically. The implant was monitored with a retrograde nasofibroscopy of the tracheal prosthesis lumen and CT scans over a course of 8 months. Results The patient's functioning in the relevant postoperative problem areas, such as swallowing, breathing, and smelling, has significantly improved. The patient was able to talk in a whispering fashion while the tracheostomy was temporarily closed. The implant's porous part was in the process of being colonized by the surrounding tissue and no fistulas were observed as evidenced by barium swallow. Conclusion As the current case shows, tracheotomy closure can be performed, and laryngeal functions are restored, by means of an implant. With further improvements, this system can alleviate the need for a permanent tracheostomy after total laryngectomy, while maintaining important larynx functions intact. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 36: 1669-1673, 2014 © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Source


Barthes J.,French Institute of Health and Medical Research | Barthes J.,University of Strasbourg | Vrana N.E.,French Institute of Health and Medical Research | Vrana N.E.,Protip SAS | And 15 more authors.
Biomaterials Science | Year: 2015

Mammalian cell culture is the starting point in many research studies focusing on biomedical applications. However, researchers have little control over the standardized cell microenvironment parameters. Here a modular ECM-mimicking surface coating for cell culture environment is designed. This substrate is a new and versatile thin film obtained by spin-coating of concentrated gelatin crosslinked by transglutaminase. It can be modified with respect to the biochemical and biophysical needs of the final cell destination, i.e. it delivers loaded multi-growth factors and serum components and allows for cell culture in a serum-free culture medium. Also, a well-known cell behavior modulator, the substrate stiffness, is controlled exogenously by addition of nanoparticles. In addition to growth factors, antimicrobial agents such as natural peptides are added to the substrate for limiting the repeated addition of antimicrobial agents to the culture medium and to prevent the increase of resistant bacterial strains in the culture environment. Finally, this substrate contains simultaneously ECM components, growth factors, stiffening elements and antimicrobial agents. It provides a favorable microenvironment and sterile conditions. It is a free-of-maintenance system, as cells will grow without addition of serum or antimicrobial cocktails. This low cost and easy-to-use substrate could emerge as a new standard for cell culture. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry. Source


Zorlutuna P.,Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology | Zorlutuna P.,University of Connecticut | Vrana N.E.,Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology | Vrana N.E.,Protip SAS | And 3 more authors.
IEEE Reviews in Biomedical Engineering | Year: 2013

The field of tissue engineering has been growing in the recent years as more products have made it to the market and as new uses for the engineered tissues have emerged, motivating many researchers to engage in this multidisciplinary field of research. Engineered tissues are now not only considered as end products for regenerative medicine, but also have emerged as enabling technologies for other fields of research ranging from drug discovery to biorobotics. This widespread use necessitates a variety of methodologies for production of tissue engineered constructs. In this review, these methods together with their non-clinical applications will be described. First, we will focus on novel materials used in tissue engineering scaffolds; such as recombinant proteins and synthetic, self assembling polypeptides. The recent advances in the modular tissue engineering area will be discussed. Then scaffold-free production methods, based on either cell sheets or cell aggregates will be described. Cell sources used in tissue engineering and new methods that provide improved control over cell behavior such as pathway engineering and biomimetic microenvironments for directing cell differentiation will be discussed. Finally, we will summarize the emerging uses of engineered constructs such as model tissues for drug discovery, cancer research and biorobotics applications. © 2008-2011 IEEE. Source

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