Proteomics Core Unit

Madrid, Spain

Proteomics Core Unit

Madrid, Spain

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Tummala K.S.,Nutrients and Cancer Group | Gomes A.L.,Nutrients and Cancer Group | Yilmaz M.,Nutrients and Cancer Group | Grana O.,Bioinformatics Unit | And 8 more authors.
Cancer Cell | Year: 2014

Molecular mechanisms responsible for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remain largely unknown. Using genetically engineered mouse models, we show that hepatocyte-specific expression of unconventional prefoldin RPB5 interactor (URI) leads to a multistep process of HCC development, whereas its genetic reduction in hepatocytes protects against diethylnitrosamine (DEN)-induced HCC. URI inhibits aryl hydrocarbon (AhR)- and estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated transcription of enzymes implicated in L-tryptophan/kynurenine/nicotinamideadenine dinucleotide (NAD+) metabolism, thereby causing DNA damage at early stages of tumorigenesis. Restoring NAD+ pools with nicotinamide riboside (NR) prevents DNA damage and tumor formation. Consistently, URI expression in human HCC is associated with poor survival and correlates negatively with L-tryptophan catabolism pathway. Our results suggest that boosting NAD+ can be prophylactic or therapeutic in HCC. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.


PubMed | Royal London Hospital, Nutrients and Cancer Group, Proteomics Core Unit, BBVA Foundation Cancer Cell Biology Programme and 2 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Cancer cell | Year: 2014

Molecular mechanisms responsible for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remain largely unknown. Using genetically engineered mouse models, we show that hepatocyte-specific expression of unconventional prefoldin RPB5 interactor (URI) leads to a multistep process of HCC development, whereas its genetic reduction in hepatocytes protects against diethylnitrosamine (DEN)-induced HCC. URI inhibits aryl hydrocarbon (AhR)- and estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated transcription of enzymes implicated in L-tryptophan/kynurenine/nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) metabolism, thereby causing DNA damage at early stages of tumorigenesis. Restoring NAD(+) pools with nicotinamide riboside (NR) prevents DNA damage and tumor formation. Consistently, URI expression in human HCC is associated with poor survival and correlates negatively with L-tryptophan catabolism pathway. Our results suggest that boosting NAD(+) can be prophylactic or therapeutic in HCC.


Martinez P.,Telomeres and Telomerase Group | Gomez-Lopez G.,Bioinformatics Core Unit | Garcia F.,Proteomics Core Unit | Mercken E.,U.S. National Institutes of Health | And 4 more authors.
Cell Reports | Year: 2013

RAP1 is part of shelterin, the protective complex at telomeres. RAP1 also binds along chromosome arms, where it is proposed to regulate gene expression. To investigate the nontelomeric roles of RAP1 invivo, we generated a RAP1 whole-body knockout mouse. These mice show early onset of obesity, which is more severe in females than in males. Rap1-deficient mice show accumulation of abdominal fat, hepatic steatosis, and high-fasting plasma levels of insulin, glucose, cholesterol, and alanine aminotransferase. Gene expression analyses of liver and visceral white fat from Rap1-deficient mice before the onset of obesity show deregulation of metabolic programs, including fatty acid, glucose metabolism, and PPARα signaling. We identify Pparα and Pgc1α as key factors affected by Rap1deletion in the liver. We show that RAP1 bindsto Pparα and Pgc1α loci and modulates theirtranscription. These findings reveal a role for a telomere-binding protein in the regulation of metabolism. © 2013 The Authors.


Cuello S.,Complutense University of Madrid | Ximenez-Embun P.,Proteomics Core Unit | Ruppen I.,Proteomics Core Unit | Schonthaler H.B.,BBVA Foundation CNIO Cancer Cell Biology Programme | And 4 more authors.
Analyst | Year: 2012

Mercury toxicity and its implications in development are a major concern, due to the major threat to ecosystems and human health that this compound represents. Although some of the effects of methylmercury (MeHg) exposure have been extensively studied, the molecular mechanisms of interaction between this compound and developing organisms are still not completely understood. To provide further insights into these mechanisms, we carried out a quantitative proteomic study (iTRAQ) using zebrafish larvae exposed to 5 μg L-1 and 25 μg L-1 MeHg as a model. In this study, a multidimensional approach combining isoelectric focusing (IEF) and strong cation exchange (SCX) followed by reversed phase liquid chromatography prior to MALDI TOF/TOF analysis was employed, which resulted in a substantial increase in proteome coverage. Among the proteins identified, 71 were found de-regulated by more than 1.5-fold, and implicated in embryonic development, protein synthesis, calcium homeostasis and energy production. Furthermore, morphological and histological analysis of exposed larvae was carried out, reflecting changes such as smaller swim bladder, remaining yolk, bent body axis and accumulation of blood in the heart, among others. This journal is © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.


Ezkurdia I.,Spanish National Cancer Research Center | Del Pozo A.,Spanish National Cancer Research Center | Frankish A.,Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute | Rodriguez J.M.,Spanish National Cancer Research Center | And 4 more authors.
Molecular Biology and Evolution | Year: 2012

Advances in high-throughput mass spectrometry are making proteomics an increasingly important tool in genome annotation projects. Peptides detected in mass spectrometry experiments can be used to validate gene models and verify the translation of putative coding sequences (CDSs). Here, we have identified peptides that cover 35% of the genes annotated by the GENCODE consortium for the human genome as part of a comprehensive analysis of experimental spectra from two large publicly available mass spectrometry databases. We detected the translation to protein of "novel" and "putative" protein-coding transcripts as well as transcripts annotated as pseudogenes and nonsense-mediated decay targets.We provide a detailed overview of the population of alternatively spliced protein isoforms that are detectable by peptide identification methods. We found that 150 genes expressed multiple alternative protein isoforms. This constitutes the largest set of reliably confirmed alternatively spliced proteins yet discovered. Three groups of genes were highly overrepresented. We detected alternative isoforms for 10 of the 25 possible heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins, proteins with a key role in the splicing process. Alternative isoforms generated from interchangeable homologous exons and from short indels were also significantly enriched, both in human experiments and in parallel analyses of mouse and Drosophila proteomics experiments. Our results show that a surprisingly high proportion (almost 25%) of the detected alternative isoforms are only subtly different from their constitutive counterparts.Many of the alternative splicing events that give rise to these alternative isoforms are conserved in mouse. It was striking that very few of these conserved splicing events broke Pfam functional domains or would damage globular protein structures. This evidence of a strong bias toward subtle differences in CDS and likely conserved cellular function and structure is remarkable and strongly suggests that the translation of alternative transcripts may be subject to selective constraints. © 2012 The Author(s).


Saucedo-Cuevas L.P.,Spanish National Cancer Research Center | Ruppen I.,Proteomics Core Unit | Ximenez-Embun P.,Proteomics Core Unit | Domingo S.,Spanish National Cancer Research Center | And 5 more authors.
Oncotarget | Year: 2014

The CUL4A E3 ubiquitin ligase is involved in the regulation of many cellular processes and its amplification and/or overexpression has been observed in breast cancer. The 13q34 amplification, which is associated with the basal-like breast cancer subtype, has been proposed as one of the mechanism behind CUL4A up-regulation. However, the specific contribution of CUL4A to the biology of basal-like breast tumors has not yet been elucidated. In this work, by using cellular models of basal phenotype, we show the inhibitory effect of CUL4A silencing in the proliferation and growth of breast cancer cells both, in vitro and in vivo. We also demonstrate the transforming capacity of CUL4A exogenous overexpression in the 184B5 human mammary epithelial cells in vitro. Our results suggest a synergistic effect between CUL4A high levels and the activation of the RAS pathway in the tumorigenesis of basal-like breast cancer tumors. In addition, by using a proteomics approach we have defined novel candidate proteins and pathways that might mediate the oncogenic effect of CUL4A. In particular, we report a putative role of CUL4A in bypassing the immune system in breast cancer through the down-regulation of several molecules involved in the immune surveillance. These findings provide insight into the oncogenic properties of CUL4A in basal-like breast cancer and highlight the therapeutic opportunities to target CUL4A.


Lovera S.,University College London | Morando M.,Oswaldo Cruz Foundation | Pucheta-Martinez E.,University College London | Martinez-Torrecuadrada J.L.,Proteomics Core Unit | And 2 more authors.
PLoS Computational Biology | Year: 2015

Due to its inhibition of the Abl kinase domain in the BCR-ABL fusion protein, imatinib is strikingly effective in the initial stage of chronic myeloid leukemia with more than 90% of the patients showing complete remission. However, as in the case of most targeted anti-cancer therapies, the emergence of drug resistance is a serious concern. Several drug-resistant mutations affecting the catalytic domain of Abl and other tyrosine kinases are now known. But, despite their importance and the adverse effect that they have on the prognosis of the cancer patients harboring them, the molecular mechanism of these mutations is still debated. Here by using long molecular dynamics simulations and large-scale free energy calculations complemented by in vitro mutagenesis and microcalorimetry experiments, we model the effect of several widespread drug-resistant mutations of Abl. By comparing the conformational free energy landscape of the mutants with those of the wild-type tyrosine kinases we clarify their mode of action. It involves significant and complex changes in the inactive-to-active dynamics and entropy/enthalpy balance of two functional elements: the activation-loop and the conserved DFG motif. What is more the T315I gatekeeper mutant has a significant impact on the binding mechanism itself and on the binding kinetics. © 2015 Lovera et al.


PubMed | Oswaldo Cruz Foundation, Proteomics Core Unit and University College London
Type: Journal Article | Journal: PLoS computational biology | Year: 2015

Due to its inhibition of the Abl kinase domain in the BCR-ABL fusion protein, imatinib is strikingly effective in the initial stage of chronic myeloid leukemia with more than 90% of the patients showing complete remission. However, as in the case of most targeted anti-cancer therapies, the emergence of drug resistance is a serious concern. Several drug-resistant mutations affecting the catalytic domain of Abl and other tyrosine kinases are now known. But, despite their importance and the adverse effect that they have on the prognosis of the cancer patients harboring them, the molecular mechanism of these mutations is still debated. Here by using long molecular dynamics simulations and large-scale free energy calculations complemented by in vitro mutagenesis and microcalorimetry experiments, we model the effect of several widespread drug-resistant mutations of Abl. By comparing the conformational free energy landscape of the mutants with those of the wild-type tyrosine kinases we clarify their mode of action. It involves significant and complex changes in the inactive-to-active dynamics and entropy/enthalpy balance of two functional elements: the activation-loop and the conserved DFG motif. What is more the T315I gatekeeper mutant has a significant impact on the binding mechanism itself and on the binding kinetics.

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