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Mena-Bueno S.,University of Santiago de Compostela | Atanasova M.,ANFACO CECOPESCA | Fernandez-Trasancos A.,University of Santiago de Compostela | Paradela-Dobarro B.,University of Santiago de Compostela | And 6 more authors.
Food and Function | Year: 2016

Objective: epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) from patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) contains higher levels of inflammatory proteins and lower adiponectin levels than subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT), enhancing the progression of atherosclerosis. Since products from sea cucumber have anti-inflammatory properties, we investigated its effect on EAT, SAT and endothelial cells. Methods: stromal cells or explants from EAT and SAT were obtained from patients with cardiovascular disease. Extracts were obtained after hydrolysis by food-grade enzymes at different times. Proteins were identified by LC-MALDI mass spectrometry. Adipogenesis and adiponectin induction were determined on stromal cells in the presence/absence of extracts. The bioavailability of the extracts was tested on a Caco-2 cell culture model in vitro. The bioavailable fraction was probed on endothelial cells and EAT or SAT explants. Vascular cell adhesion protein (VCAM-1), intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1), IL-6 and adiponectin were determined by real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results: our results showed that H. forskali and P. tremulus extracts contained compounds with anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. The bioavailable fraction of P. tremulus reduced VCAM-1 (p < 0.01) and IL-6 (p < 0.05) expression levels in endothelial cells while bioavailable compounds from H. forskali decreased ICAM-1 expression in SAT (p < 0.05). No effect was observed on EAT. Conclusion: these results suggest that sea cucumber extracts might be used for the prevention of endothelial cells and SAT inflammation. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2015.


PubMed | Ebiotec EuroEspes Biotecnologia, ANFACO CECOPESCA, University of Santiago de Compostela and Proteomic Unit
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Food & function | Year: 2016

epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) from patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) contains higher levels of inflammatory proteins and lower adiponectin levels than subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT), enhancing the progression of atherosclerosis. Since products from sea cucumber have anti-inflammatory properties, we investigated its effect on EAT, SAT and endothelial cells.stromal cells or explants from EAT and SAT were obtained from patients with cardiovascular disease. Extracts were obtained after hydrolysis by food-grade enzymes at different times. Proteins were identified by LC-MALDI mass spectrometry. Adipogenesis and adiponectin induction were determined on stromal cells in the presence/absence of extracts. The bioavailability of the extracts was tested on a Caco-2 cell culture model in vitro. The bioavailable fraction was probed on endothelial cells and EAT or SAT explants. Vascular cell adhesion protein (VCAM-1), intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1), IL-6 and adiponectin were determined by real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).our results showed that H. forskali and P. tremulus extracts contained compounds with anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. The bioavailable fraction of P. tremulus reduced VCAM-1 (p < 0.01) and IL-6 (p < 0.05) expression levels in endothelial cells while bioavailable compounds from H. forskali decreased ICAM-1 expression in SAT (p < 0.05). No effect was observed on EAT.these results suggest that sea cucumber extracts might be used for the prevention of endothelial cells and SAT inflammation.


Villacorta P.J.,University of Granada | Salmeron-Garcia A.,Hospitales Universitarios Of Granada | Pelta D.A.,University of Granada | Cabeza J.,Hospitales Universitarios Of Granada | And 2 more authors.
Analyst | Year: 2015

We evaluated the use of the peptide mass fingerprint (PMF) obtained by matrix assisted laser desorption and ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS) to track changes in the structure of a protein. The first problem we had to overcome was the inherent complexity of the PMF, which makes it difficult to compare. We dealt with this problem by developing a cluster-based comparison algorithm which takes into account the proportional error made by the mass spectrometer. This procedure involves grouping together similar masses in an intelligent manner, so that we can determine which data correspond to the same peptide (any slight differences can be explained as experimental errors), and which of them are too different and thus more likely to represent different peptides. The proposed algorithm was applied to track changes in a commercially available monoclonal antibody (mAb), namely rituximab (RTX), prepared under the usual hospital conditions and stored refrigerated (4°C) and frozen (-20°C) for a long term study. PMFs were obtained periodically over three months. For each checked time, five replicates of the PMFs were obtained in order to evaluate the similarities between them by means of the occurrences of the particular peptides (m/z). After applying the algorithm to the PMF, different approaches were used to analyse the results. Surprisingly, all of them suggested that there were no differences between the two storage conditions tested, i.e. the RTX samples were almost equally well preserved when stored refrigerated at 4°C or frozen at -20°C. The cluster-based methodology is new in protein mass spectrometry and could be useful as an easy test for major changes in proteins and biopharmaceutics for diverse applications in industry and other fields, and could provide additional stability data in relation to the practical use of anticancer drugs. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry.


Velez P.,University of Santiago de Compostela | Ocaranza-Sanchez R.,Institute Investigacion Sanitaria Of Santiago Of Compostela Idis Santiago Of Compostela Spain | Lopez-Otero D.,Institute Investigacion Sanitaria Of Santiago Of Compostela Idis Santiago Of Compostela Spain | Grigorian-Shamagian L.,Cedars Sinai Medical Center | And 4 more authors.
Proteomics - Clinical Applications | Year: 2016

Purpose: Platelets play a fundamental role in the atherothrombotic events that lead to an acute myocardial infarction. In the present study we compared the proteome of intracoronary and peripheral arterial platelets from ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients in the search for potential platelet biomarkers/drug targets related to what is happening at the culprit site. Experimental design: Ten STEMI patients were recruited and blood collected from the occluded coronary artery, at the culprit site, in the moment of reperfusion. Systemic blood obtained from the radial artery of the same patients was used as control. Proteome analysis was based on high-resolution 2D-DIGE and mass spectrometry. Validations were by western blotting in a group of 11 patients. Results: Sixteen differentially regulated protein features were identified, corresponding to 15 ORFs, mostly related to cytoskeletal and signaling proteins. We demonstrate the up-regulation of integrin αIIb (ITA2B), the adapter Src kinase-associated phosphoprotein-2 (SKAP2), and thrombospondin-1 isoforms in intracoronary platelets. Conclusion and clinical relevance: This study constitutes the first analyzing in detail the proteome of arterial intracoronary platelets from STEMI patients. We show variations in the platelet proteome when comparing intracoronary and peripheral platelets. Observed differences might be related to platelet activation events at the culprit site. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.


PubMed | Immunobiology of inflammation, Proteomic Unit, University of Zaragoza, Microscopy and Dynamic Imaging Unit and 3 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of cell science | Year: 2016

HDAC6 is a tubulin deacetylase involved in many cellular functions related to cytoskeleton dynamics, including cell migration and autophagy. In addition, HDAC6 affects antigen-dependent CD4(+)T cell activation. In this study, we show that HDAC6 contributes to the cytotoxic function of CD8(+)T cells. Immunization studies revealed defective cytotoxic activity in vivo in the absence of HDAC6. Adoptive transfer of wild-type or Hdac6(-/-)CD8(+)T cells to Rag1(-/-)mice demonstrated specific impairment in CD8(+)T cell responses against vaccinia infection. Mechanistically, HDAC6-deficient cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) showed defective in vitro cytolytic activity related to altered dynamics of lytic granules, inhibited kinesin-1-dynactin-mediated terminal transport of lytic granules to the immune synapse and deficient exocytosis, but not to target cell recognition, T cell receptor (TCR) activation or interferon (IFN) production. Our results establish HDAC6 as an effector of the immune cytotoxic response that acts by affecting the dynamics, transport and secretion of lytic granules by CTLs.


Mourino-Alvarez L.,Hospital Nacional Of Paraplejicos | Calvo E.,Proteomic Unit | Moreu J.,Hospital Virgen Of La Salud | Padial L.R.,Hospital Virgen Of La Salud | And 3 more authors.
Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - General Subjects | Year: 2013

Background Circulating endothelial cells (CECs) and endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) represent two scarce blood populations that are thought to play important roles in tissue vascularization. They have also been proposed as potential markers for more than a dozen pathologies. Moreover, EPCs have arisen as a new therapeutic option for cardiovascular disease. However nowadays there is certain controversy about their roles and a better understanding of EPC biology is required to develop new strategies for forthcoming therapies. Methods Flow cytometry analysis was performed on freshly isolated mononuclear cells from control subjects and Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS) patients. EPCs and CECs for both groups were isolated and quantified. Statistical analyses were performed to test the potential biomarker usefulness of both populations in ACS together with the first "in vivo" proteomic characterizations of these populations. Results Our results do not show statistical differences in the quantification of CECs and EPCs in control subjects and ACS patients. The proteomic characterization allowed us to identify 673 proteins associated to CECs (389 in controls and 462 in ACS patients), and another 502 proteins in EPCs (350 in controls and 274 in ACS patients). Conclusions Our data show the necessity to obtain a more accurate and specific phenotype of CECs and EPCs cells as well as a flow cytometry "golden standard" protocol, before they can be considered useful clinical markers. General significance The proteomic data suggest a potential effect of ACS in the protein profiles of these cells. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.


Riederer B.M.,Proteomic Unit | Riederer B.M.,University of Lausanne | Leuba G.,Proteomic Unit | Leuba G.,Center for Psychiatric Neuroscience | ElHajj Z.,Proteomic Unit
Experimental Biology and Medicine | Year: 2013

It is widely accepted that protein oxidation is involved in a variety of diseases, including neurodegenerative diseases. Especially during aging, a reduction in anti-oxidant defence mechanisms leads to an increased formation of free radical oxygen species and consequently results in a damage of proteins, including mitochondrial and synaptic ones. Even those proteins involved in repair and protein clearance via the ubiquitin proteasome and lysosomal system are subject to damage and show a reduced function. Here, we will discuss a variety of mechanisms and provide examples where cognition is affected and where repair mechanisms are no longer sufficient to compensate for a dysfunction of damaged proteins or even may become toxic. Next to physiological deficits, an accumulation of deficient proteins in aggresomes may occur and result in a formation of pathological hallmark structures typical for aging and disease. A major challenge is how to prevent aberrant oxidation, given that oxidation plays an essential role in aging and neurodegenerative diseases. Particularly interesting are the possibilities to reduce the formation of radical oxygen species leading to a dysfunction of protein repair and protein clearance, or to a formation of toxic byproducts accelerating neurodegeneration. © 2013 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.


PubMed | University of Barcelona, Proteomic Unit, Barcelona Institute for Research in Biomedicine and Autonomous University of Barcelona
Type: | Journal: Scientific reports | Year: 2015

Neurodegenerative processes are preceded by neuronal dysfunction and synaptic disconnection. Disconnection between spinal motoneuron (MN) soma and synaptic target leads either to a retrograde degenerative process or to a regenerative reaction, depending injury proximity among other factors. Distinguished key events associated with one or other processes may give some clues towards new therapeutical approaches based on boosting endogenous neuroprotective mechanisms. Root mechanical traction leads to retrograde MN degeneration, but share common initial molecular mechanisms with a regenerative process triggered by distal axotomy and suture. By 7 days post-injury, key molecular events starts to diverge and sign apart each destiny. We used comparative unbiased proteomics to define these signatures, coupled to a novel network-based analysis to get biological meaning. The procedure implicated the previous generation of combined topological information from manual curated 19 associated biological processes to be contrasted with the proteomic list using gene enrichment analysis tools. The novel and unexpected results suggested that motoneurodegeneration is better explained mainly by the concomitant triggering of anoikis, anti-apoptotic and neuropathic-pain related programs. In contrast, the endogenous neuroprotective mechanisms engaged after distal axotomy included specifically rather anti-anoikis and selective autophagy. Validated protein-nodes and processes are highlighted across discussion.


PubMed | University of Lausanne and Proteomic Unit
Type: | Journal: Brain research bulletin | Year: 2016

Human autopsy brain tissue is widely used to study neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimers, Parkinsons and other diseases. However, when it comes to an evaluation of data obtained from such tissue, it is essential to consider potential postmortem effects on protein composition, posttranslational modification and proteolysis with increasing postmortem delays. In this study, we analyzed mouse brain tissues with different postmortem delays (pmd) of 0 h, 6h and 24h, for changes in protein composition, proteolysis and modifications such as S-nitrosylation, carbonylation and ubiquitination. Proteins involved in Alzheimers disease (AD) were of special interest, including cytoskeletal and synaptic proteins or proteins involved in inflammation. Several proteins were fairly resistant to degradation during the first 6h but started to degrade thereafter. S-nitrosylation and carbonylation showed not much variation, except for those proteins that were susceptible to degradation. Brain spectrin was S-nitrosylated at death, and S-nitrosylated degradation fragments were measured at a pmd of 24h, indicating a susceptibility of brain spectrin to degradation. Furthermore, the physiological role of S-nitrosylation remains to be investigated. When studying human brain tissue, some proteins are more susceptible to degradation than others, while ubiquitination and carbonylation were little affected during the first 24h after death.


de la Torre-Escudero E.,CSIC - Institute of Natural Resources and Agriculture Biology of Salamanca | Valero L.,Proteomic Unit | Perez-Sanchez R.,CSIC - Institute of Natural Resources and Agriculture Biology of Salamanca | Manzano-Roman R.,CSIC - Institute of Natural Resources and Agriculture Biology of Salamanca | Oleaga A.,CSIC - Institute of Natural Resources and Agriculture Biology of Salamanca
Journal of Proteomics | Year: 2012

Schistosomes are blood parasites adapted to their intravascular habitat that have evolved mechanisms to evade the immune and hemostatic responses of their hosts. It has been observed that the schistosome can regulate the endothelium function along the infection, which contributes to modulation of host defensive responses and parasite survival. The purpose of this work was the analysis of the changes induced by Schistosoma bovis adult worms in the proteome expressed by infected mice on the endothelial surface of their portal vein. With this aim, we have utilized a methodology that allows the purification, identification and relative quantification of endothelial cell surface proteins after their selective in vivo labeling with biotin. Trypsin digestion of the biotinylated proteins and subsequent liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry analysis (LC-MS/MS) resulted in the identification of a total 127 non-redundant proteins. All these proteins have been classified according to their function and cellular location, and the differences between S. bovis-infected and non-infected mice in their endothelial surface proteomes have been analyzed. The present work provides the first data on the proteome of the endothelial surface of the portal vein, and identifies some of the changes induced in it after an infection by S. bovis. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

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