Proteomic and Metabonomic Laboratory

Santa Lucia di Serino, Italy

Proteomic and Metabonomic Laboratory

Santa Lucia di Serino, Italy
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Mancini F.,National Research Council Italy | Mancini F.,Catholic University of Rome | Teveroni E.,National Research Council Italy | Di Conza G.,Catholic University of Leuven | And 13 more authors.
Molecular Cancer | Year: 2017

Background: Many tumor-related factors have shown the ability to affect metabolic pathways by paving the way for cancer-specific metabolic features. Here, we investigate the regulation of mTORC1 by MDM4, a p53-inhibitor with oncogenic or anti-survival activities depending on cell growth conditions. Method: MDM4-mTOR relationship was analysed through experiments of overexpression or silencing of endogenous proteins in cell culture and using purified proteins in vitro. Data were further confirmed in vivo using a transgenic mouse model overexpressing MDM4. Additionally, the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database (N = 356) was adopted to analyze the correlation between MDM4 and mTOR levels and 3D cultures were used to analyse the p53-independent activity of MDM4. Results: Following nutrient deprivation, MDM4 impairs mTORC1 activity by binding and inhibiting the kinase mTOR, and contributing to maintain the cytosolic inactive pool of mTORC1. This function is independent of p53. Inhibition of mTORC1 by MDM4 results in reduced phosphorylation of the mTOR downstream target p70S6K1 both in vitro and in vivo in a MDM4-transgenic mouse. Consistently, MDM4 reduces cell size and proliferation, two features controlled by p70S6K1, and, importantly, inhibits mTORC1-mediated mammosphere formation. Noteworthy, MDM4 transcript levels are significantly reduced in breast tumors characterized by high mTOR levels. Conclusion: Overall, these data identify MDM4 as a nutrient-sensor able to inhibit mTORC1 and highlight its metabolism-related tumor-suppressing function. © 2017 The Author(s).


Colanzi A.,National Research Council Italy | Grimaldi G.,National Research Council Italy | Catara G.,National Research Council Italy | Valente C.,National Research Council Italy | And 15 more authors.
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America | Year: 2013

ADP-ribosylation is a posttranslational modification that modulates the functions of many target proteins. We previously showed that the fungal toxin brefeldin A (BFA) induces the ADP-ribosylation of C-terminal-binding protein-1 short-form/BFA-ADP-ribosylation substrate (CtBP1-S/BARS), a bifunctional protein with roles in the nucleus as a transcription factor and in the cytosol as a regulator of membrane fission during intracellular trafficking and mitotic partitioning of the Golgi complex. Here, we report that ADP-ribosylation of CtBP1-S/BARS by BFA occurs via a nonconventional mechanism that comprises two steps: (i) synthesis of a BFA-ADP-ribose conjugate by the ADP-ribosyl cyclase CD38 and (ii) covalent binding of the BFA-ADP-ribose conjugate into the CtBP1-S/BARS NAD+-binding pocket. This results in the locking of CtBP1-S/BARS in a dimeric conformation, which prevents its binding to interactors known to be involved in membrane fission and, hence, in the inhibition of the fission machinery involved in mitotic Golgi partitioning. As this inhibition may lead to arrest of the cell cycle in G2, these findings provide a strategy for the design of pharmacological blockers of cell cycle in tumor cells that express high levels of CD38.


Marzano V.,Proteomic and Metabonomic Laboratory | Marzano V.,University of Rome Tor Vergata | Santini S.,CNRS Biotechnology and Cell Signaling Laboratory | Santini S.,University of Rome Tor Vergata | And 13 more authors.
Journal of Proteomics | Year: 2012

Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM) protein kinase is a key effector in the modulation of the functionality of some important stress responses, including DNA damage and oxidative stress response, and its deficiency is the hallmark of Ataxia Telangiectasia (A-T), a rare genetic disorder. ATM modulates the activity of hundreds of target proteins, essential for the correct balance between proliferation and cell death. The aim of this study is to evaluate the phenotypic adaptation at the protein level both in basal condition and in presence of proteasome blockage in order to identify the molecules whose level and stability are modulated through ATM expression. We pursued a comparative analysis of ATM deficient and proficient lymphoblastoid cells by label-free shotgun proteomic experiments comparing the panel of proteins differentially expressed. Through a non-supervised comparative bioinformatic analysis these data provided an insight on the functional role of ATM deficiency in cellular carbohydrate metabolism's regulation. This hypothesis has been demonstrated by targeted metabolic fingerprint analysis SRM (Selected Reaction Monitoring) on specific thermodynamic checkpoints of glycolysis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Translational Proteomics. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.


Urbani A.,University of Rome Tor Vergata | Urbani A.,Proteomic and Metabonomic Laboratory | Castagnola M.,University Cattolica | Castagnola M.,CNR Institute of Chemistry of Molecular Recognition | And 6 more authors.
Molecular BioSystems | Year: 2013

Are protein functions continuous or discretized? Proteomics investigations are starting to address this non-trivial awesome question focusing upon determining the nature of biological molecular relationships. In the following editorial we present a number of experimental studies published in this themed Proteomics Issue demonstrating the development of a new analogical vision for the interpretation of genotype-phenotype relationships. New metrics and languages are evolving, which may complement the insufficiency based on a binary digital interpretation of biological phenomena, providing new tools for the interpretation of large scale-experimental studies. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.


Mortera S.L.,University of Rome Tor Vergata | Mortera S.L.,Proteomic and Metabonomic Laboratory | Dioni I.,University of Florence | Greco V.,Proteomic and Metabonomic Laboratory | And 4 more authors.
Electrophoresis | Year: 2014

Among the most common stable-isotope labeling strategies, the reaction of formaldehyde with peptides in the presence of NaCNBH3 features many attractive aspects that are conducive to its employment in quantitation experiments in proteomics. Reductive amination, with formaldehyde and d(2)-formaldehyde, is reported to be a fast, easy, and specific reaction, undoubtedly inexpensive if compared with commercially available kits for differential isotope coding. Acetaldehyde and d(4)-acetaldehyde could be employed as well without a substantial increase in terms of cost, and should provide a wider spacing between the differentially tagged peptides in the mass spectrum. Nevertheless, only a single paper reports about a diethylation approach for quantitation. We undertook a systematic analytical investigation on the reductive amination of some standard peptides pointing out the occasional occurrence of side reactions in dependence of pH or reagents order of addition, particularly observing the formation of cyclic adducts ascribable to rearrangements involving the generated Schiff-base and all the nucleophilic sites of its chemical environment. We also tried to evaluate how much this side-products amount may impair isotope coded relative quantitation. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.


PubMed | Proteomic and Metabonomic Laboratory
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of proteomics | Year: 2012

Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM) protein kinase is a key effector in the modulation of the functionality of some important stress responses, including DNA damage and oxidative stress response, and its deficiency is the hallmark of Ataxia Telangiectasia (A-T), a rare genetic disorder. ATM modulates the activity of hundreds of target proteins, essential for the correct balance between proliferation and cell death. The aim of this study is to evaluate the phenotypic adaptation at the protein level both in basal condition and in presence of proteasome blockage in order to identify the molecules whose level and stability are modulated through ATM expression. We pursued a comparative analysis of ATM deficient and proficient lymphoblastoid cells by label-free shotgun proteomic experiments comparing the panel of proteins differentially expressed. Through a non-supervised comparative bioinformatic analysis these data provided an insight on the functional role of ATM deficiency in cellular carbohydrate metabolisms regulation. This hypothesis has been demonstrated by targeted metabolic fingerprint analysis SRM (Selected Reaction Monitoring) on specific thermodynamic checkpoints of glycolysis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Translational Proteomics.

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