ProteoGenix

Costa Mesa, CA, United States

ProteoGenix

Costa Mesa, CA, United States

Proteogenix is a corporation based in Portland, Oregon, United States, that develops and markets biomarker diagnostic tests for the detection of life-threatening pregnancy-related conditions. Proteogenix is currently developing non-invasive protein biomarker screening tests for intra-amniotic infection, premature birth, and Down syndrome, which combined cause 175,000 premature births each year in the United States alone. Wikipedia.


Time filter

Source Type

Andrew Combs C.,MEDNAX | Andrew Combs C.,Obstetrix Medical Group | Gravett M.,University of Washington | Garite T.J.,MEDNAX | And 19 more authors.
American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology | Year: 2014

Objective The purpose of this study was to compare intraamniotic inflammation vs microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity (MIAC) as predictors of adverse outcome in preterm labor with intact membranes. Study Design Interleukin-6 (IL-6) was measured in prospectively collected amniotic fluid from 305 women with preterm labor. MIAC was defined by amniotic fluid culture and/or detection of microbial 16S ribosomal DNA. Cases were categorized into 5 groups: infection (MIAC; IL-6, ≥11.3 ng/mL); severe inflammation (no MIAC; IL-6, ≥11.3 ng/mL); mild inflammation (no MIAC; IL-6, 2.6-11.2 ng/mL); colonization (MIAC; IL-6, <2.6 ng/mL); negative (no MIAC; IL-6, <2.6 ng/mL). Results The infection (n = 27) and severe inflammation (n = 36) groups had similar latency (median, <1 day and 2 days, respectively) and similar rates of composite perinatal morbidity and mortality (81% and 72%, respectively). The colonization (n = 4) and negative (n = 195) groups had similar outcomes (median latency, 23.5 and 25 days; composite morbidity and mortality rates, 21% and 25%, respectively). The mild inflammation (n = 47) groups had outcomes that were intermediate to the severe inflammation and negative groups (median latency, 7 days; composite morbidity and mortality rates, 53%). In logistic regression adjusting for gestational age at enrollment, IL-6 ≥11.3 and 2.6-11.2 ng/mL, but not MIAC, were associated significantly with composite morbidity and mortality rates (odds ratio [OR], 4.9; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.2-11.2, OR, 3.1; 95% CI, 1.5-6.4, and OR, 1.8; 95% CI, 0.6-5.5, respectively). Conclusion We confirmed previous reports that intraamniotic inflammation is associated with adverse perinatal outcomes whether or not intraamniotic microbes are detected. Colonization without inflammation appears relatively benign. Intraamniotic inflammation is not simply present or absent but also has degrees of severity that correlate with adverse outcomes. We propose the designation amniotic inflammatory response syndrome to denote the adverse outcomes that are associated with intraamniotic inflammation. © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.


PubMed | Obstetrix Medical Group of Washington, Thomas Jefferson University, University of Washington, MEDNAX and 9 more.
Type: Comparative Study | Journal: American journal of obstetrics and gynecology | Year: 2014

The purpose of this study was to compare intraamniotic inflammation vs microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity (MIAC) as predictors of adverse outcome in preterm labor with intact membranes.Interleukin-6 (IL-6) was measured in prospectively collected amniotic fluid from 305 women with preterm labor. MIAC was defined by amniotic fluid culture and/or detection of microbial 16S ribosomal DNA. Cases were categorized into 5 groups: infection (MIAC; IL-6, 11.3 ng/mL); severe inflammation (no MIAC; IL-6, 11.3 ng/mL); mild inflammation (no MIAC; IL-6, 2.6-11.2 ng/mL); colonization (MIAC; IL-6, <2.6 ng/mL); negative (no MIAC; IL-6, <2.6 ng/mL).The infection (n = 27) and severe inflammation (n = 36) groups had similar latency (median, <1 day and 2 days, respectively) and similar rates of composite perinatal morbidity and mortality (81% and 72%, respectively). The colonization (n = 4) and negative (n = 195) groups had similar outcomes (median latency, 23.5 and 25 days; composite morbidity and mortality rates, 21% and 25%, respectively). The mild inflammation (n = 47) groups had outcomes that were intermediate to the severe inflammation and negative groups (median latency, 7 days; composite morbidity and mortality rates, 53%). In logistic regression adjusting for gestational age at enrollment, IL-6 11.3 and 2.6-11.2 ng/mL, but not MIAC, were associated significantly with composite morbidity and mortality rates (odds ratio [OR], 4.9; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.2-11.2, OR, 3.1; 95% CI, 1.5-6.4, and OR, 1.8; 95% CI, 0.6-5.5, respectively).We confirmed previous reports that intraamniotic inflammation is associated with adverse perinatal outcomes whether or not intraamniotic microbes are detected. Colonization without inflammation appears relatively benign. Intraamniotic inflammation is not simply present or absent but also has degrees of severity that correlate with adverse outcomes. We propose the designation amniotic inflammatory response syndrome to denote the adverse outcomes that are associated with intraamniotic inflammation.


Pereira L.,Oregon Health And Science University | Reddy A.P.,Diabetomics, Llc | Alexander A.L.,Oregon Health And Science University | Lu X.,ProteoGenix | And 4 more authors.
American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology | Year: 2010

Objective: The purpose of this study was to identify peptide classifiers that predict spontaneous preterm birth (SPTB) among women in preterm labor (PTL) and to demonstrate specific protein pathways that are activated in PTL. Study Design: Serum from 110 women with PTL between 20 weeks and 33 weeks 6 days of gestation was subjected to glycoprotein purification, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry peptide profiling, 2-dimensional liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, and pathway analysis. Women were divided into 2 groups: delivery at <34 weeks' gestation (SPTB group) and delivery at ≥34 weeks' gestation (PTL group). Results: Twenty-three peptide masses were identified that discriminated PTL from SPTB in 97% of cases. Fifty-two proteins were present differentially between PTL and SPTB; 48 of 52 proteins were classified into 1 of 4 functional pathways that were involved with PTL: (1) complement/coagulation cascade, (2) inflammation/immune response, (3) fetal-placental development, and (4) extracellular matrix proteins. Conclusion: Among women in PTL, proteomic analysis of serum peptides and glycoproteins classifies women who will deliver preterm and identifies specific protein pathways at work among individuals with "idiopathic" PTL. © 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.


Rasanen J.,Oregon Health And Science University | Rasanen J.,University of Oulu | Girsen A.,University of Oulu | Lu X.,ProteoGenix | And 14 more authors.
Journal of Proteome Research | Year: 2010

We systematically characterized maternal serum proteome in women with clinical preeclampsia (PE) and asymptomatic women in early pregnancy that subsequently developed PE. Clinical PE cohort comprised 30 patients with mild PE, 30 with severe PE, and 58 normotensive women. Preclinical PE cohort included 149 women whose serum samples were collected at 8-14 gestational weeks and in whom 30 women later developed mild and 40 severe PE. Serum proteome was analyzed and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were used for protein quantification. In Clinical PE, fibronectin, pappalysin-2, choriogonadotropin-β, apolipoprotein C-III, cystatin-C, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1, and endoglin were more abundant compared to normotensive women. In preclinical PE, differently expressed proteins included placental, vascular, transport, matrix, and acute phase proteins. Angiogenic and antiangiogenic proteins were not significant. We conclude that placental and antiangiogenic proteins are abundant in clinical PE. In preclinical PE, proteomic profile is distinct and different from that in clinical PE. © 2010 American Chemical Society.


Loading ProteoGenix collaborators
Loading ProteoGenix collaborators