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SEATTLE, WA, United States

Fox C.B.,Infectious Disease Research Institute | Baldwin S.L.,Infectious Disease Research Institute | Duthie M.S.,Infectious Disease Research Institute | Duthie M.S.,Protein Advances, Inc. | And 3 more authors.
Vaccine | Year: 2011

Squalene-based oil-in-water emulsions have been used for years in some seasonal and pandemic influenza vaccines. However, concerns have been expressed regarding squalene source and potential biological activities. Little information is available regarding the immunomodulatory activity of squalene in comparison with other metabolizable oils in the context of oil-in-water emulsions formulated with vaccines. The present work describes the manufacture and physical characterization of emulsions composed of different classes of oils, including squalene, long chain triglycerides, a medium chain triglyceride, and a perfluorocarbon, all emulsified with egg phosphatidylcholine. Some differences were apparent among the non-squalene oils in terms of emulsion stability, including higher size polydispersity in the perfluorocarbon emulsion, more rapid visual instability at 60 °C for the long-chain triglyceride and perfluorocarbon emulsions, and an increased creaming rate in the medium-chain triglyceride emulsion at 60 °C as detected by laser scattering optical profiling. The biological activity of each of these emulsions was compared when formulated with either a recombinant malaria antigen or a split-virus inactivated influenza vaccine. Overall, vaccines containing the squalene emulsion elicited higher antibody titers and more abundant long-lived plasma cells than vaccines containing emulsions based on other oils. Since squalene-based emulsions show higher adjuvant potency compared to the other oils tested, non-squalene oils may be more suitable as carriers of amphiphilic or hydrophobic immunostimulatory molecules (such as TLR agonists) rather than as stand-alone adjuvants. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.


Windish H.P.,Infectious Disease Research Institute | Duthie M.S.,Infectious Disease Research Institute | Duthie M.S.,Protein Advances, Inc. | Ireton G.,Infectious Disease Research Institute | And 5 more authors.
Vaccine | Year: 2011

Tuberculosis is a major health concern. Non-living tuberculosis (TB) vaccine candidates may not only be safer than the current vaccine (BCG) but could also be used to boost BCG to enhance or elongate protection. No subunit vaccines, however, are currently available for TB. To address this gap and to improve the global TB situation, we have generated a defined subunit vaccine by genetically fusing the genes of 3 potent protein Mtb antigens, Rv2875, Rv3478 and Rv1886, into a single product: ID87. When delivered with a TLR4 agonist-based adjuvant, GLA-SE, ID87 immunization reduced Mtb burden in the lungs of experimentally infected mice. The reduction in bacterial burden of ID87/GLA-SE immunized mice was accompanied by an early and significant leukocyte infiltration into the lungs during the infectious process. ID87/GLA-SE appears to be a promising new vaccine candidate that warrants further development. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.


Trademark
Protein Advances, Inc. | Date: 2012-07-18

Vaccines.


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 719.80K | Year: 2008

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Leprosy is an age-old disease that has been causing human suffering for millennia. Although chemotherapeutic and diagnostic advances have been made, there is still an urgent need for a good diagnostic test in order to i mprove monitoring and early detection. We have access to protein candidates and a diagnostic platform that could revolutionize the diagnosis of leprosy. In this application we will build prototypes and evaluate them in large populations to demonstrate that these tools work better than the currently approved diagnostic kits. If the field testing goes well we will proceed with manufacture and marketing of this product. We hope to have the next generation diagnostic field test for leprosy at the end of this fu nding cycle. PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE Reliably predicting and diagnosing leprosy would greatly assist treatment and eradication programs around the world. By validating and commercializing this field test we intend to improve global health.


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 100.00K | Year: 2007

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Leprosy is an age-old disease that has been causing human suffering for millennia. Although chemotherapeutic and diagnostic advances have been made, there is still an urgent need for a good diagnostic test in order to improve monitoring and early detection. We have identified recombinant protein candidates that we believe are alone better than the current diagnostic standard. By making a peptide library spanning numerous of our top candidates and fusing these into a new fusion protein we will have a candidate that can be easily manufactured and should have better sensitivity than the current field test. With the funding provided in this application Protein Advances Inc. thinks we can make a large step in creating the next generation diagnostic field test for leprosy. Diagnosing leprosy would greatly assist treatment and eradication programs around the world. By commercializing the field test we propose to develop here and utilizing to target leprosy treatment a great impact on global health could be achieved.

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