Prostate Center Northwest

Gronau, Germany

Prostate Center Northwest

Gronau, Germany

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Labanaris A.P.,Prostate Center Northwest | Labanaris A.P.,St Antonius Medical Center | Engelhard K.,Martha Maria Medical Center | Zugor V.,Prostate Center Northwest | And 2 more authors.
Urology | Year: 2011

Objectives To examine whether one could spare patients with a clinical suspicion of prostate cancer (PCa) but inapparent tumor on multimodality endorectal magnetic resonance imaging (e-MRI) of the prostate from undergoing prostate biopsy. Methods A total of 109 patients with a clinical suspicion of PCa underwent conventional and functional e-MRI of the prostate and subsequently prostate biopsy. The inclusion criteria were prostate-specific antigen level >4 ng/mL or a suspicious finding on digital rectal examination. The images were interpreted by a highly experienced radiologist and were considered negative for PCa in all cases. Regardless of the negative findings, all patients underwent an 18-core prostate biopsy. Functional e-MRI included contrast-enhanced e-MRI and diffusion-weighted imaging. The examinations were performed on a closed 1.0-T system combined with an endorectal body phased-array coil. The clinicopathologic parameters of the patients included age, prostate-specific antigen level, digital rectal examination findings, PCa detection rate, clinically significant PCa detection rate, high-grade PCa detection rate, and e-MRI specificity. Results The median age of the patients was 67.4 years, and the median prostate-specific antigen level was 12.9 ng/mL. The digital rectal examination findings were positive in 42 patients (38.5%) and negative in 67 patients (61.5%). Overall, PCa was detected in 19.2% of patients, with 47.6% cases defined as clinically significant and 38.1% as high grade. Overall, the e-MRI specificity was 80.8%. Conclusions The results of our study have shown that the absence of tumor on e-MRI scans of patients with a clinical suspicion of PCa does not rule out the probability of clinically significant and high-grade PCa, making prostate biopsy mandatory for these patients as well. © 2011 Elsevier Inc.


Labanaris A.P.,Prostate Center Northwest | Witt J.H.,Prostate Center Northwest | Zugor V.,Prostate Center Northwest
Anticancer Research | Year: 2012

Background: The aim of this study is to evaluate the surgical, the oncological and the functional outcomes in men ≥75 years of age undergoing robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). Patients and Methods: The records of N=2000 men who underwent RARP from February 2006 to April 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. A total of 45 patients who were ≥75 years of age were indentified. A comparison was performed between the overall patient cohort and the aforementioned patients. The analyzed parameters included: minor and major postoperative complications, postoperative Gleason score, pathological stage, positive-margin status, continence and potency in 12 months, disease-specific mortality and presence of biochemical progression at the follow-up period. Results: The following results reflect the comparison of the overall cohort of patients vs. the cohort of patients who were ≥75 years of age. A statistical difference of the analyzed parameters was observed only minor complications 11.4% vs. 15.5% (p<0.05), neurovascular bundle (NVB) preservation 65.7% vs. 51.1% (p<0.05) and potency after 12 months 66.2% vs. 39.6% (p<0.001). Major complications were noted in 1.3% vs. 2.2% of cases. A Gleason score <7 was noted in 42.8% vs. 37.3%, a Gleason score 7 in 47.7% vs. 51.1% and a Gleason score >7 in 9.5% vs. 11.6%. Organ-confined disease was noted in 73.5% vs. 68.8%, extraprostatic extension in 25.2% vs. 31.2% and positive surgical margin status was encountered in 8.9% vs. 11.1% of cases. At 12 months, 92.8% vs. 86.9% of patients were continent and 66.2% vs. 39.6% were potent. After a median follow-up of 17.2 months no disease-specific mortality was evident and 95.5% were free of biochemical progression in the cohort of patients who were ≥75 years of age. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that RARP in patients ≥75 years of age is a safe surgical procedure with limited complications, excellent oncologic and continence outcomes as well as acceptable potency outcomes. Nevertheless, RARP should be limited to a selected cohort of patients with a good overal health status and an individual life expectancy of more than 10 years in order for the oncological advantages of surgery to be achieved.


Labanaris A.P.,Prostate Center Northwest | Zugor V.,Prostate Center Northwest | Witt J.H.,Prostate Center Northwest
Anticancer Research | Year: 2012

Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the surgical, oncological and functional outcomes in men ≤50 years of age treated with robot-assisted (RARP). Patients and Methods: The records of 2000 men who underwent RARP from February 2006 to April 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. A total of 68 patients who were ≤50 years of age were indentified. A comparison was performed between the overall patient cohort and the aforementioned patients. The analyzed parameters included: minor and major postoperative complications, postoperative Gleason score, pathological stage, positive margin status, continence and potency 12 months after treatment and presence of biochemical progression and disease-specific mortality during the follow-up period. Results: The following results reflect the comparison of the overall cohort of patients vs. the cohort of patients who were ≤50 years of age. A statistical difference of the analyzed parameters was observed in prostate weight 56.1 g vs. 31.4 g (p<0.05), in bilateral neurovascular bundle (NVB) preservation 65.7% vs. 92.6% (p<0.05), and in oncological and functional outcomes. Organ-confined disease was noted in 73.5% vs. 78.5% (p<0.05), extraprostatic extension in 25.2% vs. 21.5% (p<0.05) and positive surgical margins were encountered in 8.9% vs. 5.8% (p<0.05). A Gleason score <7 was noted in 42.8% vs. 54.4% (p<0.05), a Gleason score 7 in 47.7% vs. 41.2% (p<0.05) and a Gleason score >7 in 9.5% vs. 4.4% (p<0.05). At 12 months, 92.8% vs. 95.5% were continent and 66.2% vs. 93.7% (p<0.001) were potent. After a median follow-up of 17.8 months, 97.1% patients of the ≤50 years patient cohort were free of biochemical progression and no disease-specific mortality was evident. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that RARP in patients ≤50 years of age is a safe surgical procedure with limited complications and excellent oncologial and functional outcomes. Although the preservation of the NVB in such patients is preferable, this can be performed without compromising the radical nature of cancer surgery.


Zugor V.,Prostate Center Northwest | Witt J.H.,Prostate Center Northwest | Heidenreich A.,RWTH Aachen | Porres D.,RWTH Aachen | Labanaris A.P.,Prostate Center Northwest
Anticancer Research | Year: 2012

Background: The objective of this study was to assess the surgical and the oncological outcomes in patients with a preoperative prostate specific antigen (PSA) value >20 ng/ml, undergoing robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) for prostate cancer. Patients and Methods: The records of 2000 men who underwent RARP from February 2006 to April 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. A total of 147 (7.3%) patients with a preoperative PSA value >20 ng/ml were identified. A comparison was performed between the overall patient cohort and the patients with PSA >20 ng/ml. The analyzed parameters included: minor and major postoperative complications, postoperative Gleason score, pathological stage, positive margins and lymph node status, as well as biochemical progression and disease-specific mortality during the follow-up period. Results: The following results reflect the comparison of the overall cohort of patients vs. the cohort of patients who had a preoperative PSA >20ng/ml. A statistical difference of the analyzed parameters was observed for median PSA value 10.3 ng/ml vs. 34.8 ng/ml (p < 0.05), for bilateral neurovascular bundle preservation 65.7% vs. 19.7% (p < 0.001), for a Gleason score <7, 42.8% vs. 12.9% (p<0.05) and for a Gleason score >7 in 9.5% vs. 19.7% (p<0.05). Organ-confined disease was noted in 73.5% vs. 31.9% (p<0.05) and extraprostatic extension in 25.2% vs. 86.1% (p<0.05). The percentage of cancer found in the prostate specimen was 16.1% vs. 38.1% (p<0.05) and a positive surgical margin (PSM) status was encountered in 8.9% vs. 33.3% (p<0.05) of patients. Positive lymph nodes were encountered in 3.2% vs. 17.1% of patients (p<.05). After a median follow-up of 19.6 months (range 3-56 months), 118 patients (80.2%) were free of biochemical progression and no disease-specific mortality was evident. Conclusion: Although RARP in patients with preoperative PSA >20 ng/ml is a safe surgical procedure with limited complications, the risk of positive lymph nodes, as well as the PSM status are found to be significantly higher. Patients should be informed of these probable outcomes, as well as for a possible need for adjuvant treatment before undergoing the procedure.


Zugor V.,Prostate Center Northwest | Labanaris A.P.,Prostate Center Northwest | Bauer R.M.,Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich | Witt J.H.,Prostate Center Northwest
Anticancer Research | Year: 2012

Background: The objective of this study was to assess the surgical and oncological outcomes in patients with a preoperative prostate specific antigen (PSA) value <4 ng/ml undergoing robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) for prostate cancer. Patients and Methods: The records of 2000 men who underwent RARP from February 2006 to April 2010, were retrospectively reviewed. A total of 169 (8.4%) patients with a preoperative PSA value <4 ng/ml were identified. A comparison was performed between the overall patient cohort and the aforementioned patients. The analyzed parameters included: minor and major postoperative complications, postoperative Gleason score, pathological stage, positive margin status as well as presence of biochemical progression and of disease-specific mortality during the follow-up period. Results: The following results reflect the comparison of the overall cohort of patients vs. the cohort of patients who had a preoperative PSA value <4; ng/ml. A statistical difference of the analyzed parameters was observed in the median PSA value; 10.3 ng/ml (0.3-220 ng/ml) vs. 2.8 ng/ml (0.3-3.9 ng/ml) (p<0.001), in bilateral NVB; 65.7% vs. 85.2% (p<0.001), in Gleason score <7; 42.8% vs. 59.1% (p<0.05), in Gleason score 7; 47.7% vs. 36.6% (p<0.05) and in Gleason score >7 in 9.5% vs. 3.5% (p<0.001). Organ-confined disease was noted in 73.5% vs. 86.3% (p<0.05), extraprostatic extension in 25.2% vs. 13.7% (p<0.05). The percentage of cancer found in the prostate specimen was 16.1% (1-99%) vs. 7.3% (1-96%) (p<0.05) and a positive surgical margin status was encountered in 8.9% vs. 4.7% (p<0.05) of patients. Pelvic lymph node dissection was performed in 1623 patients (81.2%) of the overall cohort out of whom 64 cases (3.2%) were positive for metastasis. In the patient cohort of PSA value <4 ng/ml, pelvic lymph node dissection was performed in 114 patients (67.4%), out of which one case (0.5%) was positive for metastasis (p<0.05). After a median follow-up of 24.2 months (range 3-56 months), 162 patients (95.8%) were free of biochemical progression and no disease-specific mortality was evident. Conclusion: RARP in patients with a preoperative PSA value <4 ng/ml is a safe surgical procedure with limited complications and excellent oncological outcome.


Zugor V.,Prostate Center Northwest | Labanaris A.P.,Prostate Center Northwest | Porres D.,Prostate Center Northwest | Witt J.H.,Prostate Center Northwest
Journal of Endourology | Year: 2012

Purpose: The objective of this study was to assess the surgical, oncologic, and short-term functional outcomes of patients with a history of transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) who underwent robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP). Patients and Methods: The records of 2000 men who underwent RALP from February 2006 to April 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. A total of 80 men had undergone TURP before RALP. A match-paired analysis was performed using our database to identify 80 additional men without a history of TURP with equivalent clinicopathologic characteristics to serve as a control group (non-TURP group). The parameters compared included patient preoperative clinicopathologic characteristics, intraopeoperative characteristics, postoperative oncologic characteristics, minor and major postoperative complications, continence, and potency. Results: The mean time between TURP and RALP was 3.6 months (3-6 months). Regarding preoperative characteristics, a statistical difference was only observed regarding preoperative patient potency in the TURP vs non-TURP group. Regarding intraopeoperative characteristics, a statistical difference was observed regarding the need for bladder neck reconstruction and skin-to-skin operative time. Regarding postoperative pathologic characteristics, the positive surgical margin rate was not significant when the two groups were compared. The continence and potency rates in 12 months were similar (87.5%/91.25%) and (70.3%/86.5%) for both patient cohorts. Conclusion: Although the procedure is technically more demanding, exhibits a prolonged operative time and time interval before continence and potency returns, it can be safely performed without compromising functional results as well as the radical nature of cancer surgery. © Copyright 2012, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.


Labanaris A.P.,Prostate Center Northwest | Zugor V.,Prostate Center Northwest | Witt J.H.,Prostate Center Northwest | Nutzel R.,Martha Maria Medical Center | Kuhn R.,Martha Maria Medical Center
Urologia Internationalis | Year: 2011

Urethral diverticula in men are uncommon clinical entities. Their clinical manifestations include urinary tract infection, hematuria, irritative or obstructive voiding symptoms, ventral bulging and displacement of the penile shaft. Male urethral diverticulum with massive lithiasis presenting as a scrotal mass with stress urinary incontinence as the main symptom is extremely rare. Herein, we present such a case. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.


The objective of this study was to assess the surgical, oncologic, and short-term functional outcomes of patients with a history of transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) who underwent robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP).The records of 2000 men who underwent RALP from February 2006 to April 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. A total of 80 men had undergone TURP before RALP. A match-paired analysis was performed using our database to identify 80 additional men without a history of TURP with equivalent clinicopathologic characteristics to serve as a control group (non-TURP group). The parameters compared included patient preoperative clinicopathologic characteristics, intraopeoperative characteristics, postoperative oncologic characteristics, minor and major postoperative complications, continence, and potency.The mean time between TURP and RALP was 3.6 months (3-6 months). Regarding preoperative characteristics, a statistical difference was only observed regarding preoperative patient potency in the TURP vs non-TURP group. Regarding intraopeoperative characteristics, a statistical difference was observed regarding the need for bladder neck reconstruction and skin-to-skin operative time. Regarding postoperative pathologic characteristics, the positive surgical margin rate was not significant when the two groups were compared. The continence and potency rates in 12 months were similar (87.5%/91.25%) and (70.3%/86.5%) for both patient cohorts.Although the procedure is technically more demanding, exhibits a prolonged operative time and time interval before continence and potency returns, it can be safely performed without compromising functional results as well as the radical nature of cancer surgery.


PubMed | Prostate Center Northwest
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Urology | Year: 2011

To examine whether one could spare patients with a clinical suspicion of prostate cancer (PCa) but inapparent tumor on multimodality endorectal magnetic resonance imaging (e-MRI) of the prostate from undergoing prostate biopsy.A total of 109 patients with a clinical suspicion of PCa underwent conventional and functional e-MRI of the prostate and subsequently prostate biopsy. The inclusion criteria were prostate-specific antigen level>4 ng/mL or a suspicious finding on digital rectal examination. The images were interpreted by a highly experienced radiologist and were considered negative for PCa in all cases. Regardless of the negative findings, all patients underwent an 18-core prostate biopsy. Functional e-MRI included contrast-enhanced e-MRI and diffusion-weighted imaging. The examinations were performed on a closed 1.0-T system combined with an endorectal body phased-array coil. The clinicopathologic parameters of the patients included age, prostate-specific antigen level, digital rectal examination findings, PCa detection rate, clinically significant PCa detection rate, high-grade PCa detection rate, and e-MRI specificity.The median age of the patients was 67.4 years, and the median prostate-specific antigen level was 12.9 ng/mL. The digital rectal examination findings were positive in 42 patients (38.5%) and negative in 67 patients (61.5%). Overall, PCa was detected in 19.2% of patients, with 47.6% cases defined as clinically significant and 38.1% as high grade. Overall, the e-MRI specificity was 80.8%.The results of our study have shown that the absence of tumor on e-MRI scans of patients with a clinical suspicion of PCa does not rule out the probability of clinically significant and high-grade PCa, making prostate biopsy mandatory for these patients as well.


PubMed | Prostate Center Northwest
Type: Case Reports | Journal: Urologia internationalis | Year: 2011

Urethral diverticula in men are uncommon clinical entities. Their clinical manifestations include urinary tract infection, hematuria, irritative or obstructive voiding symptoms, ventral bulging and displacement of the penile shaft. Male urethral diverticulum with massive lithiasis presenting as a scrotal mass with stress urinary incontinence as the main symptom is extremely rare. Herein, we present such a case.

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