Alessandria del Carretto, Italy
Alessandria del Carretto, Italy

Time filter

Source Type

Fukushima K.,Polytechnic University of Turin | Tabuani D.,PROPLAST Consortium | Rizzarelli P.,CNR Institute of Chemistry and Technology of Polymers | Camino G.,Polytechnic University of Turin
Materials Science and Engineering C | Year: 2010

PCL nanocomposites based on two organically modified montmorillonites at 5% clay loading were biodegraded in a mature compost. All samples showed an effective degradation in compost but nanoclays were found to partially delay the process. Biodegradation carried out by microorganisms isolated from the compost showed that the bacterium Bacillus licheniformis was able to degrade the studied systems without considerable differences in the polymer degradation trend due to the presence of nanoclays. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


Fukushima K.,Polytechnic University of Turin | Tabuani D.,PROPLAST Consortium | Abbate C.,University of Catania | Arena M.,University of Catania | Rizzarelli P.,CNR Institute of Chemistry and Technology of Polymers
European Polymer Journal | Year: 2011

PLA and PCL based nanocomposites prepared by adding three different types of fumed silica were obtained by melt blending. Materials were characterized by means of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA) and Dynamic-Mechanical Thermal Analysis (DMTA). A good distribution of the fumed silica into both polymer matrices was observed. The highest thermo-mechanical improvements were reached by addition of the fumed silica with higher surface area. PLA and its nanocomposites were degraded in compost at 58 °C; at this temperature all samples presented a significant level of polymer degradation, but a certain protection action of silica towards PLA degradation was observed, whereas the addition of fumed silica did not show considerable influence on the degradation trend of PCL. These dissimilarities were attributed to the different degradation mechanism of the two polymers. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Fukushima K.,Polytechnic University of Turin | Tabuani D.,PROPLAST Consortium | Abbate C.,University of Catania | Arena M.,University of Catania | Ferreri L.,CNR Institute of Chemistry and Technology of Polymers
Polymer Degradation and Stability | Year: 2010

PLA and PCL nanocomposites prepared by adding 5 wt% of a sepiolite (SEPS9) were degraded in compost, leading to effective degradation for all samples. PLA and PLA/SEPS9 seem to be mainly degraded by a bulk mechanism, showing a significant level of polymer degradation, however the presence of SEPS9 particles partially delays the degradation probably due to a preventing effect of these particles on polymer chain mobility and/or PLA/enzymes miscibility. PCL and PCL/SEPS9 showed a preferential surface mechanism of degradation; and in contrast to PLA, sepiolite does not present a considerable barrier effect on the degradation of PCL. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Monti M.,Proplast Consortium | Tsampas S.A.,Swerea SICOMP | Fernberg S.P.,Swerea SICOMP | Fernberg S.P.,Lulea University of Technology | And 5 more authors.
Polymer Degradation and Stability | Year: 2015

In this paper, we report the development of a glass fiber commingled composite (GFCC) based on a nanoclay-doped polyamide 6 (PA6) and the evaluation of its fire reaction. The preparation of the composite comprised several steps. Firstly, the nanoclay was dispersed in the PA6 matrix. Then, the produced compound was spun in filaments and commingled with continuous glass fibers. Finally, the laminate preform was consolidated. Reference samples based on the neat PA6 were produced as well. As a results, although it is well known that, in the presence of a relevant amount of continuous fibers, the behavior of the material is mainly driven by the fibers themselves (e.g. mechanical, thermal, conductive, and so on), the effect of the clay was interesting, especially in flammability test (UL94 vertical burning test), where the total burning time passes from 227 s to 146 s. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.


Fukushima K.,Polytechnic University of Turin | Tabuani D.,PROPLAST Consortium | Dottori M.,University of Perugia | Armentano I.,University of Perugia | And 2 more authors.
Polymer Degradation and Stability | Year: 2011

PLA and its nanocomposite films based on modified montmorillonite (CLO30B) or fluorohectorite (SOM MEE) and unmodified sepiolite (SEPS9) were processed at a clay loading of 5 wt% and hydrolytically degraded at 37 and 58°C in a pH 7.0 phosphate-buffered solution. An effective hydrolytic degradation for neat PLA and nanocomposites was obtained at both temperatures of degradation, with higher extent at 58°C due to more extensive micro-structural changes and molecular rearrangements, allowing a higher water absorption into the polymer matrix. The addition of CLO30B and SEPS9 delayed the degradation of PLA at 37°C due to their inducing PLA crystallization effect and/or to their high water uptake reducing the amount of water available for polymer matrix hydrolysis. The presence of SOM MEE also induced polymer crystallization, but it was also found to catalyze hydrolysis of PLA. Concerning hydrolysis at 58°C, the presence of any nanoparticle did not significantly affect the degradation trend of PLA, achieving similar molecular weight decreases for all the studied materials. This was related to the easy access of water molecules to the bulk material at this temperature, minimizing the effect of polymer crystallinity clay nature and aspect ratio on the polymer degradation. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Tabuani D.,PROPLAST Consortium | Bellucci F.,PROPLAST Consortium | Terenzi A.,University of Perugia | Camino G.,Polytechnic University of Turin
Polymer Degradation and Stability | Year: 2012

Fire resistant TPU formulations containing different amounts of a melamine based flame retardant (i.e. melamine cyanurate) and nanoclays have been studied. The synergism between melamine cyanurate and clay in composites thermal stability and flame resistance have been assessed by means of thermo-gravimetry and combustion tests, namely LOI and cone calorimeter. Composites mechanical and rheological properties have been also evaluated. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Fukushima K.,Polytechnic University of Turin | Tabuani D.,PROPLAST Consortium | Arena M.,University of Catania | Gennari M.,University of Catania | Camino G.,Polytechnic University of Turin
Reactive and Functional Polymers | Year: 2013

PLA nanocomposites based on two different clays (CLO30B and SOMMEE) at 5 and 10 wt.% clay loading were prepared by melt-blending, obtaining a good level of clay dispersion as well as considerable thermo-mechanical improvements in PLA, according to WAXS, SEM, TEM, DMTA and tensile strength analysis. Addition of clays induced PLA crystallization by nucleation, especially upon addition of SOMMEE, promoting kinetics and extent of crystallization of the polymer, especially at high clay content. Concerning the thermal and mechanical properties, the highest improvements in PLA matrix were obtained upon 10% clay addition, especially SOMMEE, becoming more noticeable with increasing temperature. An effective degradation of PLA and nanocomposites in compost at 40 °C was also achieved. It was found that addition of nanoparticles, especially SOMMEE, accelerated the degradation process of PLA, particularly at higher clay content, probably due to catalysis by the hydroxyl groups belonging to the silicate layers surface and/or to their organic modifier. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Monti M.,Proplast Consortium | Camino G.,Proplast Consortium | Camino G.,Polytechnic University of Turin
Polymer Degradation and Stability | Year: 2013

In this paper, we report a thorough study on the thermal stability and fire behavior of polyethersulfone (PES) filled with 2 wt% nano-sized aluminum oxide hydroxide particles (boehmite). The nanocomposite was prepared through melt compounding technique in a co-rotating twin screw extruder. The obtained morphology of the composite was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with elemental analysis, proving that an even distribution of sub-micron boehmite particles was obtained. PES shear modulus, measured by DMA, is increased by 30% in the boehmite nanocomposite. Thermal stability of the produced materials was studied through thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), whereas the combustion behavior through cone calorimeter and vertical burning (UL-94) tests. Cone calorimeter results show that a significant overall flame retardant effect was observed due to the presence of boehmite nanoparticles, which could not be detected by UL-94 fire scenario where neat PES is already top ranked V0. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Fukushima K.,Polytechnic University of Turin | Tabuani D.,PROPLAST Consortium | Camino G.,Polytechnic University of Turin
Materials Science and Engineering C | Year: 2012

Nanocomposites were prepared by melt blending Poly(lactic acid) with 5 and 7 wt% of an organically modified montmorillonite or an organically modified magnesium sodium fluoro-hectorite or unmodified sepiolite. All nanocomposites show a good level of clay dispersion into the polymer matrix as well as a considerable thermal and thermo-mechanical properties improvement. According to thermal analysis, the clays seem to act as nucleating agents inducing a higher degree of crystallinity of the polymer and rate of crystallization. Similar increases in the thermal stability of Poly(lactic acid) were obtained for all clays. Concerning layered silicate nanocomposites, it was found that the main influencing factors on the thermo-mechanical properties appear to be the aspect ratio and dispersion of clay nanoplatelets, rather than polymer/clay chemical compatibility. Needle like sepiolite shows thermo-mechanical improvements comparable to some layered silicates and an interesting ability to maintain high storage modulus values at increasing temperatures, due to its good dispersion within the polymer without the need of organic modifiers as instead necessary for layered clays used in this work. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


Monti M.,Proplast Consortium | Hoydonckx H.,TransFurans Chemicals | Stappers F.,TransFurans Chemicals | Camino G.,Proplast Consortium | Camino G.,Polytechnic University of Turin
European Polymer Journal | Year: 2015

Abstract In this paper, we report the development of furan resin nanocomposites, filled with silica nanoparticles. In order to have a dispersion procedure, which could be easily up-scalable to the industrial level, a commercially available water-based suspension of silica particles was used. This was possible thanks to the fact that water is a good solvent of furan resin. Different treatments with silanes were performed in order to improve the interaction between the silica particles and the furan matrix. As a result, the thermal oxidative resistance of the furan resin is improved with also a minor improvement of fire reaction, which is already quite substantial in the pristine resin. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.

Loading PROPLAST Consortium collaborators
Loading PROPLAST Consortium collaborators