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Warmington R.,Project Eden | Clarkson J.P.,University of Warwick
Plant and Soil | Year: 2015

Aims: Sclerotia of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum survive in soil and germinate to produce apothecia which release airborne ascospores. Current control methods rely predominantly on the use of fungicides to kill ascospores. The aim of this research was to identify potential biofumigation treatments which suppress sclerotial germination, providing a potential alternative and long-term approach to disease management. Methods: Microcosm and in vitro experiments were conducted using dried and milled plant material from six different biofumigant crop plants to determine effects on carpogenic germination of sclerotia and mycelial growth of S. sclerotiorum. Results: All biofumigant plants significantly reduced germination of S. sclerotiorum sclerotia in the microcosm experiments, but were less effective against larger sclerotia. In vitro experiments showed a direct effect of biofumigant volatiles on both the mycelial growth of S. sclerotiorum, and carpogenic germination of sclerotia, where the most effective treatment was B. juncea ‘Vittasso’. Conclusions: It was clear from this study that biofumigant crop plants have potential as part of an integrated disease management system for control of S. sclerotiorum. The microcosm experiments described here provide a straightforward and reliable screening method for evaluating different biofumigants for activity. © 2015 Springer International Publishing Switzerland


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: NERC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 1.19M | Year: 2014

This innovative interdisciplinary project aims to develop an easy-to-use, evidence-based resource which can be used in decision-making in drought risk management. To achieve this, we will bring together information from drought science and scenario-modelling (using mathematical models to forecast the impacts of drought) with stakeholder engagement and narrative storytelling. While previous drought impact studies have often focused on using mathematical modelling, this project is very different. The project will integrate arts, humanities and social science research methods, with hydrological, meteorological, agricultural and ecological science knowledge through multi-partner collaboration. Seven case study catchments (areas linked by a common water resource) in England, Wales and Scotland will be selected to reflect the hydrological, socio-economic and cultural contrasts in the UK. Study of drought impacts will take place at different scales - from small plot experiments to local catchment scale. Citizen science and stakeholder engagement with plot experiments in urban and rural areas will be used as stimuli for conversations about drought risk and its mitigation. The project will: (i) investigate different stakeholder perceptions of when drought occurs and action is needed; (ii) examine how water level and temperature affect drought perception; (iii) explore the impact of policy decisions on drought management; (iv) consider water users behaviours which lead to adverse drought impacts on people and ecosystems and; (v) evaluate water-use conflicts, synergies and trade-offs, drawing on previous drought experiences and community knowledge. The project spans a range of sectors including water supply; health, business, agriculture/horticulture, built environment, extractive industries and ecosystem services, within 7 case-study catchments. Through a storytelling approach, scientists will exchange cutting edge science with different drought stakeholders, and these stakeholders will, in turn, exchange their knowledge. Stakeholders include those in: construction; gardeners and allotment holders; small and large businesses; local authorities; emergency planners; recreational water users; biodiversity managers; public health professionals - both physical and mental health; and local communities/public. The stakeholder meetings will capture various data including: - different stakeholder perceptions of drought and its causes - local knowledge around drought onset and strategies for mitigation (e.g. attitudes to water saving, responses to reduced water availability) - insights into how to live with drought and increase individual/community drought resilience - the impact of alternating floods and droughts The information will be shared within, and between, stakeholder groups in the case-studies and beyond using social media. This information will be analysed, and integrated with drought science to develop an innovative web-based decision-making utility. These data will feedback into the drought modelling and future scenario building with a view to exploring a variety of policy options. This will help ascertain present and future water resources availability, focusing on past, present and future drought periods across N-S and W-E climatic gradients. The project will be as far as possible be open science - maintaining open, real-time access to research questions, data, results, methodologies, narratives, publications and other outputs via the project website, updated as the project progresses. Project outputs will include: the decision-making support utility incorporating science-narrative resources; hydrological models for the 7 case-study catchments; a social media web-platform to share project resources; a database of species responses/management options to mitigate drought/post-drought recovery at different scales, and management guidelines on coping with drought/water scarcity at different scales.


Tooke F.,Project Eden | Battey N.H.,University of Reading
Journal of Experimental Botany | Year: 2010

Individuals, families, networks, and botanic gardens have made records of flowering times of a wide range of plant species over many years. These data can highlight year to year changes in seasonal events (phenology) and those datasets covering long periods draw interest for their perspective on plant responses to climate change. Temperateflowering phenology is complex, using environmental cues such as temperature and photoperiod to attune floweringto appropriate seasonal conditions. Here we give an overview of flowering phenological recording, outline differentpatterns of flowering, and look at the interpretation of datasets in relation to seasonal and climatic change. ©The Author [2010]. Published by Oxford University Press [on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.


Orr N.,University of Exeter | Wagstaffe A.,Project Eden | Briscoe S.,University of Exeter | Garside R.,University of Exeter
BMC Geriatrics | Year: 2016

Background: Despite the increased scholarly interest in the senses and sensory experiences, the topic of older people's sensory engagement with nature is currently under researched. This paper reviews and synthesises qualitative research evidence about how older people, including those living with dementia, describe their sensory engagement with the natural world. Methods: Ten databases were searched from 1990 to September 2014: MEDLINE (Ovid), MEDLINE-in-Process (Ovid), PsycINFO (Ovid), CINAHL (EBSCO), GreenFILE (EBSCO), ProQuest Sociology, ASSIA (ProQuest), International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (ProQuest); HMIC (Ovid); Social Policy and Practice (Ovid). Forward and backward citation chasing of included articles was conducted; 20 organizations were contacted to identify unpublished reports. Screening was undertaken independently by two reviewers. Results: Twenty seven studies were included. Thematic analysis revealed that descriptions of sensory experiences are encompassed within six themes: descriptions from 'the window'; sensory descriptions that emphasise vision; descriptions of 'being in nature'; descriptions of 'doing in nature'; barriers to sensory engagement; and meanings of being and doing in nature. Conclusions: Older people derive considerable pleasure and enjoyment from viewing nature, being and doing in nature which, in turn has a positive impact on their wellbeing and quality of life. Future research could usefully explore how sensory engagement with nature could be used to stimulate reminiscences of places and people, and evoke past sensory experiences to enrich everyday life and maintain a sense of self. The protocol was registered with PROSPERO (CRD42015020736). © 2016 The Author(s).


PubMed | University of Exeter and Project Eden
Type: | Journal: BMC geriatrics | Year: 2016

Despite the increased scholarly interest in the senses and sensory experiences, the topic of older peoples sensory engagement with nature is currently under researched. This paper reviews and synthesises qualitative research evidence about how older people, including those living with dementia, describe their sensory engagement with the natural world.Ten databases were searched from 1990 to September 2014: MEDLINE (Ovid), MEDLINE-in-Process (Ovid), PsycINFO (Ovid), CINAHL (EBSCO), GreenFILE (EBSCO), ProQuest Sociology, ASSIA (ProQuest), International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (ProQuest); HMIC (Ovid); Social Policy and Practice (Ovid). Forward and backward citation chasing of included articles was conducted; 20 organizations were contacted to identify unpublished reports. Screening was undertaken independently by two reviewers.Twenty seven studies were included. Thematic analysis revealed that descriptions of sensory experiences are encompassed within six themes: descriptions from the window; sensory descriptions that emphasise vision; descriptions of being in nature; descriptions of doing in nature; barriers to sensory engagement; and meanings of being and doing in nature.Older people derive considerable pleasure and enjoyment from viewing nature, being and doing in nature which, in turn has a positive impact on their wellbeing and quality of life. Future research could usefully explore how sensory engagement with nature could be used to stimulate reminiscences of places and people, and evoke past sensory experiences to enrich everyday life and maintain a sense of self. The protocol was registered with PROSPERO ( CRD42015020736 ).


News Article | July 2, 2011
Site: www.techinasia.com

In our discussion of the Jakarta Founder Institute yesterday, we mentioned that Project Eden is one of the startup incubators/accelerators supported by #StartupLokal and Jardintech Capital. The landing page for Project Eden is now live. Announced at the last #StartupLokal meetup, Project Eden aims to provide pre-seed investment and enable great people to launch great ideas. According to its website, the people behind Project Eden are all experienced technologist and investment entrepreneurs with a passion to support the Indonesia local start-up ecosystem. The start-up and support process accelerates the journey from  the planning stage, to beta testing, to monetization, to sustainable success. There are no less than eight people on the board: Bernhard Soebiakto, Aulia Halimatussadiah, Natali Ardianto, Calvin Kizana, Kevin Mintaraga, Megain Widjaja, Andi Sadha, and Nuniek Tirta Sari. All of them are successful entrepreneurs and definitely not strangers to the local digital scene. The story started when #StartupLokal initiator were looking for a Hackerspace in Jakarta, and to that end they posted this notice. Not long after that they got offers from five entities, the first from Kevin Mintaraga and Megain Widjaja. After some discussions and talks, the Project Eden was born. They are holding an event next week called ‘Bizconnect PPKI 2011 – Road to Menteng,’ calling on start-ups to submit their business plans. 20 will be chosen to pitch in front of them. I don’t know how often I have said this, but now is really an interesting time for Indonesia. It’s a perfect time to launch a start-up since there are so many options –whether you choose to be an independent lean start-up, or to be incubated, or to receive seed funding from venture capitalists or angel investors. There is actually quite a lot of money floating around now. But the question is, where is THE start-up? Disclaimer : Joshua Kevin is an Apprentice at #StartupLokal


News Article | March 4, 2013
Site: www.techinasia.com

It’s been quite some time since Project Eden, Indonesia’s first startup accelerator, made any announcement on its site. In fact, the last time it did so was back in 2011. What happened? We talked to Project Eden board members Natali Ardianto and Aulia Halimatussadiah (Ollie) about the program’s hiatus. But most importantly, both of them shared the biggest lesson they learned from running the project: don’t spoonfeed startups. Natali said that the first mistake was that they selected the startups mostly based on the potential of their ideas, but did not account for the people behind it. This resulted in the startups’ founders not having adequate mettle to run their business, and needing Project Eden’s constant guidance and pushing. The second mistake is that they spoonfed the startups too much and too early. Ollie said that because the board members are all entrepreneurs and have gone through similar challenges and setbacks, they now can advise the startups to avoid those foreseen obstacles. The problem is that they did so quite a lot, which makes the startups overly reliant on the board members. The only time the board members should help these startups, Natali explained, is when the startups have their backs against the wall. Is Project Eden still alive? Natali and Ollie say yes. Natali explained that they are evaluating new things now, such as the filtering process, the mentoring method, and how they evaluate the ideas. He explained about Project Eden’s latest progress: Running a business and mentoring other people to do so are two different things, it seems. But just like life, we make mistakes, we learn from them, and we will do better next time. This also underlines an even broader concept: that different incubators and venture firms have different approaches to funding. For example, we understand that CyberAgent Ventures is very hands-on, and in a way, is willing to spoonfeed. Other firms, just give money to startups. While entrepreneurship doesn’t seem to fit everyone, for those who would like to give it a try and join an accelerator program, you might want to check the Jakarta Founder Institute spring batch which is open right now and Grupara.


News Article | February 13, 2012
Site: www.techinasia.com

At the BlitzMegaplex Grand Indonesia in Jakarta, SpotMed Group held a press conference for the launch of a new service. It’s called SpotDokter, and it claims to be the first location-based mobile application focusing on health launched in Indonesia, the goal being to help the public achieve a healthier lifestyle. SpotDokter uses the phone’s GPS capability to provide health information based on location. It helps you search the nearest health facilities based on distance and time, and gives a complete directory and profile of each facility. Such a service is crucial when emergencies occur, and it also has automatic emergency calling through the app. SpotDokter is available for Blackberry, iOS, and Android. Established back in 2011, SpotMed Group is a startup co-founded by Mendy Candella, Pascal Christian, and Jaka Pradipta. They aim to become a leading company that provides integrated services to improve the standards of public health. Project Eden saw their potential and decided to take them under its wing. Mendy Candella, the CEO of Spotmed Group, remarked on the launch: We are delighted to finally launch SpotDokter today to assist the public in achieving a healthier lifestyle . . . The application will give the public a powerful tool to seek information such as where is the nearest hospital and who are the doctors on duty in their hands. We feel their frustration in finding such information online and offline, and that is why we came up with this solution.” The health industry is waiting to be disrupted, and even in Silicon Valley one of the biggest problems is tackling the health care system. We have seen other ventures into this space in Indonesia, with MeetDoctor launching last year. But it is always good to see some competition. For more on SpotDokter, see their video below.


News Article | September 22, 2015
Site: e27.co

Price comparison startup Telunjuk today announced a new round of Series A funding from Lippo Digital Ventures. Through this funding round, Lippo Digital Ventures’ Partner Rudy Ramawy is joining Telunjuk’s board together with Venture Republic and startup incubator Project Eden. Telunjuk’s Co-founder and CEO, Redya Febriyanto said in a release, “We are grateful to meet and exchange ideas with John Riady and Rudy Ramawy from Lippo Digital Ventures. Rudy Ramawy’s leadership experiences across many large companies, including Google Indonesia, convinced us to seal the deal.” According to Hanindia Narendrata, Telunjuk’s CMO, this Series A round will be used for user and merchant acquisition, as well as to sharpen their focus on product development. One of the interesting paths that will be taken by Telunjuk is to expand regionally to a few countries in Southeast Asia such as Singapore, Philippines, Malaysia, Thailand and Vietnam. Narendrata added, “It’s still tentative on which country we want to expand into, but we want to target countries where English as a language is sufficient in the market”. Also Read: Estonia’s CIO: E-residency coming to Singapore and running a government startup Founded back in 2011, now Telunjuk claims 1.5 million monthly visits to its site that hosts more than 15 million products, as a result of its partnership with local e-commerce sites. Narendrata also confirms that Telunjuk’s traffic source still comes mainly from Google searches, and that almost 80 per cent, comes from mobile. The article Telunjuk Closes Series-A Funding from Lippo Digital Ventures was first published on DailySocial.

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