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News Article | May 7, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Project Bread, a pioneer of innovative programs and initiatives designed to eradicate hunger, today held its 49th annual Walk for Hunger, the oldest continual pledge walk in the nation and largest one-day fundraiser to ease local hunger. Since 1969, the Walk for Hunger has received support from an estimated 1.2 million participants and has raised over $100 million in funding for grants statewide for emergency food programs, schools, summer food programs, community health centers, farmer’s markets, community suppers and urban agriculture programs. With nearly 15,000 registered fundraising participants who began their Walk at the Boston Common (along with thousands of additional families and individuals who entered the historic 20-mile route at various entry points), the Walk is on track to raise $2.5 million; funds raised from the Walk and the 5K Run will provide critical financial support to more than 300 hunger relief programs across the state of Massachusetts. “We have always believed that good food is a basic right for everyone,” said Ellen Parker, Project Bread’s executive director. “As the convener on this important public health issue, Project Bread continues to lead the way in Massachusetts by investing in innovative and effective programs that build food security at the community level—providing people of all ages, cultures and walks of life with sustainable, reliable access to nutritious food.” According to Project Bread’s 2016 Status Report on Hunger, nearly 675,000 people in the Commonwealth lack reliable access to good food. For nearly five decades, the annual Walk for Hunger has been a community movement of neighbors helping neighbors. “The work of the Walk doesn’t end when our thousands of supporters cross the finish line on May 7,” Parker said. “We fund emergency food services for our neighbors who need to put food on the table, or who need to find a hot meal in their community. For children, we meet them where they learn and grow, when school is in session and during the summer months. The Walk for Hunger is the keystone in unifying our efforts to end hunger in Massachusetts and without the committed fundraising efforts of our friends and families, we wouldn’t be able to do this significant work.” Walk for Hunger Partners and Sponsors In addition to the fundraising of dedicated Walkers over the past 49 years, Project Bread relies on the financial commitment of its partners and sponsors. “With the continued support of our philanthropic partners, Project Bread is able to focus its efforts on the root cause of hunger in Massachusetts,” said Carrie Privette, Project Bread’s director of development. “We are extremely fortunate to have strong relationships with companies that incorporate social good into the way they do business.” Bimbo Bakeries USA and its family of brands have contributed more than $1 million in sponsorship, employee fundraising and corporate matching gifts over the past seven years as the Walk’s flagship sponsor. This year, Arnold Bread will continue this long-standing partnership on behalf of Bimbo Bakeries. Transportation sponsor, the Arbella Insurance Foundation, celebrates its 10-year anniversary supporting the Walk for Hunger. In addition to their financial support, Team Arbella recruited over 500 Walkers this year, securing their spot as the Walk’s largest team. “Our employees are really the heart and soul of Arbella,” said John Donohue, chairman, president and CEO of the Arbella Insurance Group and chairman of the Arbella Insurance Foundation. “Giving back is part of who we are as a company and our employees exemplify that with their generosity and dedication to charitable causes. This is our 10th year as a major sponsor of Project Bread and the Walk for Hunger and I couldn’t be prouder to have more than 540 Arbella employees, along with their family and friends, as part of Team Arbella, helping to fight hunger and help their neighbors in need.” The Walk for Hunger has been a central cause to the Raytheon Company for 35 years. For Raytheon, supporting the Walk is a company-wide effort with nine teams formed out of their various company offices around the state. “Our employees raise money and really look forward to the Walk every spring to help Project Bread fight hunger across all of Massachusetts,” said Kristin Hilf, vice president of communications at Raytheon’s Integrated Defense Systems Business. Kristin has been walking with her son Daniel for the past eleven years and views this as an opportunity to lead by example and give back to the community. Returning as the Presenting Sponsor of the second annual Walk for Hunger 5K Run, Capital One has been the sponsor for the Heart & Sole tent since 2015, a meeting place for the elite fundraisers for Project Bread to gather prior to embarking upon their 20-mile trek. This 49th annual installment of the Walk for Hunger is also supported by Project Bread’s media partners, including WHDH-TV Boston, with 7News chief meteorologist Jeremy Reiner, who did weather reports live from the Common and iHeart Media radio talent from stations, Kiss 108, JAM’N 94.5 and 101.7 The Bull greeted Walkers and event volunteers. Live entertainment, snacks and activities were provided to Walk participants at the Arnold Bread Snack Stop, the halfway point of the Walk, at Arsenal Park in Watertown. The historic 20-mile Walk for Hunger route encompassed Boston’s Back Bay, Kenmore Square and Allston; Brookline; Newton (Chestnut Hill, Newton Centre, and Newton Corner); Watertown; and Cambridge before it concluded back at the Boston Common. About Project Bread Project Bread is the leading statewide anti-hunger organization committed to providing people of all ages, cultures, and walks of life with sustainable, reliable access to nutritious food. From community-based meal programs, to early childhood and school nutrition initiatives, to improved access to farm-to-table resources, Project Bread approaches hunger as a complex problem with multiple solutions. With funds raised through The Walk for Hunger, the oldest continual pledge walk in the country, and other sources, Project Bread pioneers innovative initiatives and supports effective programs to eradicate hunger in our state. For more information or to make a gift, visit http://www.ProjectBread.org/walk, http://www.Facebook.com/ProjectBread, or http://www.Twitter.com/ProjectBread. If you or someone you know is struggling to put food on the table, please call Project Bread’s FoodSource Hotline at 800-645-8333.


News Article | November 22, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

With the holiday season quickly approaching, IM Boston presents their Holiday Give Back & Kick Back event on December 1st from 7-10pm to celebrate the season with IM Boston Ambassadors, Contributors, Highlights as well as the local Boston community. IM Boston is partnering with Project Bread, an organization that promotes reliable access to healthy food for all, and all of the proceeds from the event will go towards ending hunger in Massachusetts. Attend this event to savor food sponsored by a local Boston restaurant, drink wine donated from local winery Hardwick Vineyard & Winery, and enjoy brews from a Boston area brewery. Local Boston band Modesta will be performing to set the holiday mood while you hang out with your fellow Bostonians. IM Boston will host a silent auction during the event with prizes ranging from swag bags to restaurant gift certificates and even a free vacation. All money raised from the auction will be donated to Project Bread. IM Boston was founded as a platform to bring people together around their love of Boston, and to spotlight those community members who exude a positivity that needs to be shared. This event is a way to engage with the vibrant Boston community and bring people together to celebrate the holidays while giving back to the community. “Give Back & Kick Back is more than just a holiday party. It is a way for members of both the Boston and IM Boston community to connect and come together for a common cause while also celebrating the holiday season. The event includes many local Boston companies and organizations, emphasizing Boston pride, and will have wonderful food, drinks, music and auction items. It will be a great way to kick off the holiday season and get in the winter spirit.” – Stefanie, IM Boston Co-Founder To attend this event, visit Eventbrite to register for a ticket and get your name on the list. Though admission is free, there is a suggested $5 donation that will go towards Project Bread. The event will take place at the AVA Theater District – Rooftop Sky Pavilion Lounge at 45 Stuart Street in Boston, MA 02116 on Thursday, December 1st 2016 from 7-10pm. Get your ticket today and get ready to give back & kick back. About IM Boston IM Boston is an online magazine and community that was born out of the idea that everyone has a voice and should be heard. No matter who you are; your nationality, background, living situation, income level, what path you chose for your career, you have a story. It’s interesting when you stop and actually listen to the people around you, the people of Boston, you’ll be amazed at what stories you’ll find.


Cohen J.F.W.,Harvard University | Richardson S.A.,Project Bread | Cluggish S.A.,Project Bread | Parker E.,Project Bread | And 3 more authors.
JAMA Pediatrics | Year: 2015

IMPORTANCE: Little is known about the long-term effect of a chef-enhanced menu on healthier food selection and consumption in school lunchrooms. In addition, it remains unclear if extended exposure to other strategies to promote healthier foods (eg, choice architecture) also improves food selection or consumption. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the short- and long-term effects of chef-enhanced meals and extended exposure to choice architecture on healthier school food selection and consumption. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: A school-based randomized clinical trial was conducted during the 2011-2012 school year among 14 elementary and middle schools in 2 urban, low-income school districts (intent-to-treat analysis). Included in the study were 2638 students in grades 3 through 8 attending participating schools (38.4% of eligible participants). INTERVENTIONS: Schools were first randomized to receive a professional chef to improve school meal palatability (chef schools) or to a delayed intervention (control group). To assess the effect of choice architecture (smart café), all schools after 3 months were then randomized to the smart café intervention or to the control group. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: School food selection was recorded, and consumption was measured using plate waste methods. RESULTS: After 3 months, vegetable selection increased in chef vs control schools (odds ratio [OR], 1.75;95% CI, 1.36-2.24), but there was no effect on the selection of other components or on meal consumption. After long-term or extended exposure to the chef or smart café intervention, fruit selection increased in the chef (OR, 3.08;95% CI, 2.23-4.25), smart café (OR, 1.45;95% CI, 1.13-1.87), and chef plus smart café (OR, 3.10;95% CI, 2.26-4.25) schools compared with the control schools, and consumption increased in the chef schools (OR, 0.17;95% CI, 0.03-0.30 cups/d). Vegetable selection increased in the chef (OR, 2.54;95% CI, 1.83-3.54), smart café (OR, 1.91;95% CI, 1.46-2.50), and chef plus smart café schools (OR, 7.38, 95% CI, 5.26-10.35) compared with the control schools, and consumption also increased in the chef (OR, 0.16;95% CI, 0.09-0.22 cups/d) and chef plus smart café (OR, 0.13;95% CI, 0.05-0.19 cups/d) schools; however, the smart café intervention alone had no effect on consumption. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Schools should consider both collaborating with chefs and using choice architecture to increase fruit and vegetable selection. Efforts to improve the taste of school foods through chef-enhanced meals should remain a priority because this was the only method that also increased consumption. This was observed only after students were repeatedly exposed to the new foods for 7 months. Therefore, schools should not abandon healthier options if they are initially met with resistance. TRIAL REGISTRATION: clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT02309840.


Cohen J.F.W.,Harvard University | Richardson S.,Project Bread | Parker E.,Project Bread | Catalano P.J.,Harvard University | And 2 more authors.
American Journal of Preventive Medicine | Year: 2014

Background The U.S Department of Agriculture (USDA) recently made substantial changes to the school meal standards. The media and public outcry have suggested that this has led to substantially more food waste. Purpose School meal selection, consumption, and waste were assessed before and after implementation of the new school meal standards. Methods Plate waste data were collected in four schools in an urban, low-income school district. Logistic regression and mixed-model ANOVA were used to estimate the differences in selection and consumption of school meals before (fall 2011) and after implementation (fall 2012) of the new standards among 1030 elementary and middle school children. Analyses were conducted in 2013. Results After the new standards were implemented, fruit selection increased by 23.0% and entrée and vegetable selection remained unchanged. Additionally, post-implementation entrée consumption increased by 15.6%, vegetable consumption increased by 16.2%, and fruit consumption remained the same. Milk selection and consumption decreased owing to an unrelated milk policy change. Conclusions Although food waste levels were substantial both pre- and post-implementation, the new guidelines have positively affected school meal selection and consumption. Despite the increased vegetable portion size requirement, consumption increased and led to significantly more cups of vegetables consumed. Significantly more students selected a fruit, whereas the overall percentage of fruit consumed remained the same, resulting in more students consuming fruits. Contrary to media reports, these results suggest that the new school meal standards have improved students' overall diet quality. Legislation to weaken the standards is not warranted. © 2014 American Journal of Preventive Medicine.


Cohen J.F.W.,Harvard University | Smit L.A.,Harvard University | Parker E.,Project Bread | Austin S.B.,Childrens Hospital Boston and Harvard Medical School | And 3 more authors.
Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics | Year: 2012

School cafeterias can play an important role in providing healthy meals. Although schools participating in the National School Lunch Program are required to meet minimum program standards, advocates recommend that innovations be sought to enhance menu dietary quality. This study evaluated the Chef Initiative, a 2-year pilot study in two Boston middle schools, designed to increase the availability and consumption of healthier school foods. Between 2007 and 2009, a professional chef trained cafeteria staff to prepare healthier school lunches (ie, more whole grains, fresh/frozen fruits and vegetables, and less sugar, salt, saturated fats, and trans fats). Meal nutrient compositions were monitored from 2007 to 2009, and a plate waste study conducted in the spring of 2009 compared food selection and consumption patterns among students at Chef Initiative schools, with students receiving standard school lunches at two matched control schools. Paired t tests and descriptive statistics were used to examine differences in menus and mixed-model analysis of variance was used to analyze differences in students' food selection and consumption between Chef Initiative and control schools. Overall, the Chef Initiative schools provided healthier lunches and the percent of foods consumed at Chef Initiative and control schools were similar (61.6% vs 57.3%; P=0.63). Of the areas targeted, there was greater whole-grain selection and vegetable consumption; 51% more students selected whole grains (P=0.02) and students consumed 0.36 more vegetable servings/day (P=0.01) at Chef Initiative schools. The potential of chefs collaborating with cafeteria staff to improve the availability, selection, and consumption of healthier meals is promising. © 2012 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.


PubMed | Brigham and Women's Hospital, Project Bread, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard University
Type: Journal Article | Journal: JAMA pediatrics | Year: 2015

Little is known about the long-term effect of a chef-enhanced menu on healthier food selection and consumption in school lunchrooms. In addition, it remains unclear if extended exposure to other strategies to promote healthier foods (eg, choice architecture) also improves food selection or consumption.To evaluate the short- and long-term effects of chef-enhanced meals and extended exposure to choice architecture on healthier school food selection and consumption.A school-based randomized clinical trial was conducted during the 2011-2012 school year among 14 elementary and middle schools in 2 urban, low-income school districts (intent-to-treat analysis). Included in the study were 2638 students in grades 3 through 8 attending participating schools (38.4% of eligible participants).Schools were first randomized to receive a professional chef to improve school meal palatability (chef schools) or to a delayed intervention (control group). To assess the effect of choice architecture (smart caf), all schools after 3 months were then randomized to the smart caf intervention or to the control group.School food selection was recorded, and consumption was measured using plate waste methods.After 3 months, vegetable selection increased in chef vs control schools (odds ratio [OR], 1.75; 95% CI, 1.36-2.24), but there was no effect on the selection of other components or on meal consumption. After long-term or extended exposure to the chef or smart caf intervention, fruit selection increased in the chef (OR, 3.08; 95% CI, 2.23-4.25), smart caf (OR, 1.45; 95% CI, 1.13-1.87), and chef plus smart caf (OR, 3.10; 95% CI, 2.26-4.25) schools compared with the control schools, and consumption increased in the chef schools (OR, 0.17; 95% CI, 0.03-0.30 cups/d). Vegetable selection increased in the chef (OR, 2.54; 95% CI, 1.83-3.54), smart caf (OR, 1.91; 95% CI, 1.46-2.50), and chef plus smart caf schools (OR, 7.38, 95% CI, 5.26-10.35) compared with the control schools, and consumption also increased in the chef (OR, 0.16; 95% CI, 0.09-0.22 cups/d) and chef plus smart caf (OR, 0.13; 95% CI, 0.05-0.19 cups/d) schools; however, the smart caf intervention alone had no effect on consumption.Schools should consider both collaborating with chefs and using choice architecture to increase fruit and vegetable selection. Efforts to improve the taste of school foods through chef-enhanced meals should remain a priority because this was the only method that also increased consumption. This was observed only after students were repeatedly exposed to the new foods for 7 months. Therefore, schools should not abandon healthier options if they are initially met with resistance.clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT02309840.


Cohen J.F.W.,Merrimack College | Cohen J.F.W.,Harvard University | Jahn J.L.,Harvard University | Richardson S.,Project Bread | And 3 more authors.
Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics | Year: 2016

Background: There are currently no national standards for school lunch period length and little is known about the association between the amount of time students have to eat and school food selection and consumption. Objective: Our aim was to examine plate-waste measurements from students in the control arm of the Modifying Eating and Lifestyles at School study (2011 to 2012 school year) to determine the association between amount of time to eat and school meal selection and consumption. Design: We used a prospective study design using up to six repeated measures among students during the school year. Participants/setting: One thousand and one students in grades 3 to 8 attending six participating elementary and middle schools in an urban, low-income school district where lunch period lengths varied from 20 to 30 minutes were included. Main outcome measures: School food selection and consumption were collected using plate-waste methodology. Statistical analyses performed: Logistic regression and mixed-model analysis of variance was used to examine food selection and consumption. Results: Compared with meal-component selection when students had at least 25 minutes to eat, students were significantly less likely to select a fruit (44% vs 57%; P<0.0001) when they had <20 minutes to eat. There were no significant differences in entrée, milk, or vegetable selections. Among those who selected a meal component, students with <20 minutes to eat consumed 13% less of their entrée (P<0.0001), 10% less of their milk (P<0.0001), and 12% less of their vegetable (P<0.0001) compared with students who had at least 25 minutes to eat. Conclusions: During the school year, a substantial number of students had insufficient time to eat, which was associated with significantly decreased entrée, milk, and vegetable consumption compared with students who had more time to eat. School policies that encourage lunches with at least 25 minutes of seated time might reduce food waste and improve dietary intake. © 2016 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.


Cohen J.F.W.,Merrimack College | Jahn J.L.,Harvard University | Richardson S.,Project Bread | Cluggish S.A.,Project Bread | And 2 more authors.
Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics | Year: 2015

Background: There are currently no national standards for school lunch period length and little is known about the association between the amount of time students have to eat and school food selection and consumption. Objective: Our aim was to examine plate-waste measurements from students in the control arm of the Modifying Eating and Lifestyles at School study (2011 to 2012 school year) to determine the association between amount of time to eat and school meal selection and consumption. Design: We used a prospective study design using up to six repeated measures among students during the school year. Participants/setting: One thousand and one students in grades 3 to 8 attending six participating elementary and middle schools in an urban, low-income school district where lunch period lengths varied from 20 to 30 minutes were included. Main outcome measures: School food selection and consumption were collected using plate-waste methodology. Statistical analyses performed: Logistic regression and mixed-model analysis of variance was used to examine food selection and consumption. Results: Compared with meal-component selection when students had at least 25 minutes to eat, students were significantly less likely to select a fruit (44% vs 57%; P<0.0001) when they had <20 minutes to eat. There were no significant differences in entrée, milk, or vegetable selections. Among those who selected a meal component, students with <20 minutes to eat consumed 13% less of their entrée (P<0.0001), 10% less of their milk (P<0.0001), and 12% less of their vegetable (P<0.0001) compared with students who had at least 25 minutes to eat. Conclusions: During the school year, a substantial number of students had insufficient time to eat, which was associated with significantly decreased entrée, milk, and vegetable consumption compared with students who had more time to eat. School policies that encourage lunches with at least 25 minutes of seated time might reduce food waste and improve dietary intake. © 2015 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

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