Programa Moscamed

Tapachula, Mexico

Programa Moscamed

Tapachula, Mexico

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Mubarqui R.L.,Servicios Aereos Biologicos Y Forestales Mubarqui | Perez R.C.,Servicios Aereos Biologicos Y Forestales Mubarqui | Kladt R.A.,Servicios Aereos Biologicos Y Forestales Mubarqui | Lopez J.L.Z.,Programa Moscamed | And 6 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2014

Background: Beyond insecticides, alternative methods to control insect pests for agriculture and vectors of diseases are needed. Management strategies involving the mass-release of living control agents have been developed, including genetic control with sterile insects and biological control with parasitoids, for which aerial release of insects is often required. Aerial release in genetic control programmes often involves the use of chilled sterile insects, which can improve dispersal, survival and competitiveness of sterile males. Currently available means of aerially releasing chilled fruit flies are however insufficiently precise to ensure homogeneous distribution at low release rates and no device is available for tsetse. Methodology/Principal Findings: Here we present the smart aerial release machine, a new design by the Mubarqui Company, based on the use of vibrating conveyors. The machine is controlled through Bluetooth by a tablet with Android Operating System including a completely automatic guidance and navigation system (MaxNav software). The tablet is also connected to an online relational database facilitating the preparation of flight schedules and automatic storage of flight reports. The new machine was compared with a conveyor release machine in Mexico using two fruit flies species (Anastrepha ludens and Ceratitis capitata) and we obtained better dispersal homogeneity (% of positive traps, p<0.001) for both species and better recapture rates for Anastrepha ludens (p<0.001), especially at low release densities (<1500 per ha). We also demonstrated that the machine can replace paper boxes for aerial release of tsetse in Senegal. Conclusions/Significance: This technology limits damages to insects and allows a large range of release rates from 10 flies/km2 for tsetse flies up to 600 000 flies/km2 for fruit flies. The potential of this machine to release other species like mosquitoes is discussed. Plans and operating of the machine are provided to allow its use worldwide. © 2014 Mubarqui et al.


PubMed | Institute Senegalais Of Recherches Agricoles, International Atomic Energy Agency, Servicios aereos Biologicos y Forestales Mubarqui, Direction des Services Veterinaires and 2 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: PloS one | Year: 2014

Beyond insecticides, alternative methods to control insect pests for agriculture and vectors of diseases are needed. Management strategies involving the mass-release of living control agents have been developed, including genetic control with sterile insects and biological control with parasitoids, for which aerial release of insects is often required. Aerial release in genetic control programmes often involves the use of chilled sterile insects, which can improve dispersal, survival and competitiveness of sterile males. Currently available means of aerially releasing chilled fruit flies are however insufficiently precise to ensure homogeneous distribution at low release rates and no device is available for tsetse.Here we present the smart aerial release machine, a new design by the Mubarqui Company, based on the use of vibrating conveyors. The machine is controlled through Bluetooth by a tablet with Android Operating System including a completely automatic guidance and navigation system (MaxNav software). The tablet is also connected to an online relational database facilitating the preparation of flight schedules and automatic storage of flight reports. The new machine was compared with a conveyor release machine in Mexico using two fruit flies species (Anastrepha ludens and Ceratitis capitata) and we obtained better dispersal homogeneity (% of positive traps, p<0.001) for both species and better recapture rates for Anastrepha ludens (p<0.001), especially at low release densities (<1500 per ha). We also demonstrated that the machine can replace paper boxes for aerial release of tsetse in Senegal.This technology limits damages to insects and allows a large range of release rates from 10 flies/km2 for tsetse flies up to 600,000 flies/km2 for fruit flies. The potential of this machine to release other species like mosquitoes is discussed. Plans and operating of the machine are provided to allow its use worldwide.


The present study was conducted in coffee plantations of Chiapas to evaluate the establishment of three African parasitoids of the coffee berry borer Hypothenemus hampei (CBB), that have been released in this region for biological control purposes. During the inter cropping period were sampled fruits infested with the CBB from 31 coffee plantations in four municipalities. The infested fruits were dissected in order to detect the presence of any of the three species of CBB parasitoids: Cephalonomia stephanoderis, Prorops nasuta and Phymastichus coffea. We were also looking for parasitism by the native parasitoid Cephalonomia hyalinipennis. For analysis, we considered several variables, such as parasitoid earlier releases, species of coffee planted, altitude of sites, the prior existence of rural young, presence of rivers and conditions of coffee (careful or careless). This data was analysed in a Generalized Lineal Model. The results showed that C. stephanoderis was found in 67,7% of samples, and the percent of parasitism ranged from 0,33 to 26%. C. hyalinipennis was only detected in a single sample and its parasitism was 3%. P nasuta and P. coffea were not found in the samples. The presence of C. stephanoderis was correlated with altitude, the species of coffee and the number of previous releases, among others. In this study we confirm the establishment of C. stephanoderis, 20 years after its first release in coffee plantations of Chiapas, Mexico. © 2010, Sociedad Venezolana de Entomología.


Teal P.E.A.,U.S. Department of Agriculture | Pereira R.,International Atomic Energy Agency | Segura D.F.,Instituto Nacional de Tecnologia Agropecuaria | Haq I.,International Atomic Energy Agency | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Applied Entomology | Year: 2013

We have been studying the behavioural and physiological mechanisms associated with coordination of reproductive maturity and sex pheromone communication in male tephritid flies in order to develop methods for acceleration of reproductive maturity among sterilized males. Our studies revealed that exposure to the juvenile hormone analogue methoprene can accelerate the rate of sexual maturity in some but not all tephritid species tested. Additionally, we have determined that incorporation of protein hydrolysate into the adult diet improves sexual performance of sterile males. Coupling a diet enriched with protein hydrolysate for adult food and application of methoprene to adult males or pupae was found to advance significantly the age at which males of a number of species of flies from the genus Anastrepha and Bactrocera cucurbitae (Coquillet) become sexually mature and improve reproductive success of the males. These results have led to the development of a novel strategy to accelerate the reproductive development and increased competitiveness of mass-reared fruit flies for use in the sterile insect technique by incorporating methoprene treatment and protein hydrolysate diets into protocols for fruit fly emergence and release facilities. The following reviews research conducted to develop the system and our suggestions for use in improving efficacy of mating by sterile males destined for release in programmes to control some species of tephritid flies using the sterile insect technique. © 2011 Blackwell Verlag, GmbH.


Leal Mubarqui R.,Servicios aereos Biologicos y Forestales Mubarqui | Perez R.C.,Servicios aereos Biologicos y Forestales Mubarqui | Kladt R.A.,Servicios aereos Biologicos y Forestales Mubarqui | Lopez J.L.,Programa Moscamed | And 4 more authors.
PloS one | Year: 2014

BACKGROUND: Beyond insecticides, alternative methods to control insect pests for agriculture and vectors of diseases are needed. Management strategies involving the mass-release of living control agents have been developed, including genetic control with sterile insects and biological control with parasitoids, for which aerial release of insects is often required. Aerial release in genetic control programmes often involves the use of chilled sterile insects, which can improve dispersal, survival and competitiveness of sterile males. Currently available means of aerially releasing chilled fruit flies are however insufficiently precise to ensure homogeneous distribution at low release rates and no device is available for tsetse.METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we present the smart aerial release machine, a new design by the Mubarqui Company, based on the use of vibrating conveyors. The machine is controlled through Bluetooth by a tablet with Android Operating System including a completely automatic guidance and navigation system (MaxNav software). The tablet is also connected to an online relational database facilitating the preparation of flight schedules and automatic storage of flight reports. The new machine was compared with a conveyor release machine in Mexico using two fruit flies species (Anastrepha ludens and Ceratitis capitata) and we obtained better dispersal homogeneity (% of positive traps, p<0.001) for both species and better recapture rates for Anastrepha ludens (p<0.001), especially at low release densities (<1500 per ha). We also demonstrated that the machine can replace paper boxes for aerial release of tsetse in Senegal.CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This technology limits damages to insects and allows a large range of release rates from 10 flies/km2 for tsetse flies up to 600,000 flies/km2 for fruit flies. The potential of this machine to release other species like mosquitoes is discussed. Plans and operating of the machine are provided to allow its use worldwide.


Diaz-Fleischer F.,University of Veracruz | Arredondo J.,Programa MoscaMed
Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata | Year: 2011

Many insect species show daily rhythms in their reproductive behaviour, with male and female cycles often being synchronized by photoperiod. In mass-rearing facilities, many environmental factors, including photoperiod, are standardized to favour insect production. However, these standardizations could affect sexual performance. Herein we studied, under semi-natural conditions, the effect of different photoperiods on the copulation behaviour of mass-reared Anastrepha ludens Loew (Diptera: Tephritidae) flies. Adult flies were exposed to six combinations of light conditions during the first 12days after eclosion: (1) 12days under a L12:D12h regime (12-LD), (2) 8days under L12:D12 followed by 4days in complete darkness (8-L:4-D), (3) 4days under L12:D12, then 8days in darkness (4-L:8-D), (4) 12days in darkness (12-D), (5) 8days in darkness, then 4days under L12:D12 (8-D:4-L), and (6) 4days in darkness followed by 8days under L12:D12 (4-D:8-L). On day 13, field-cage tests were carried out to determine fly mating performance. There was a sex-specific effect of light regime on fly copulation behaviour. Females exposed to absolute darkness during periods longer than 4days had fewer copulations compared with females subjected to other light regimes. In contrast, periods of darkness of 8 or 12days immediately before the field test affected male mating performance. There was no significant difference in the latency to copulation or in copula duration among males or females of the six treatments. We conclude that a period of 4days under dark conditions does not affect male mating performance. We discuss our results in terms of the light conditions encountered by mass-reared tephritids when emerging in packing devices, which may negatively affect their sexual performance once released in the field. © 2011 The Authors. Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata © 2011 The Netherlands Entomological Society.


Diaz-Fleischer F.,University of Veracruz | Arredondo J.,Programa MoscaMed
Journal of Experimental Biology | Year: 2011

Sensory systems are very susceptible to early environment experience. Mating success depends on the transmission of information from the signaller to the receiver, which means that sensory biases caused by developmental environment are likely to affect sexual selection. We investigated the impact of the developmental visual environment (light spectrum) on male copulation behaviour and female preference in the lekking tephritid Anastrepha ludens. We reared flies in four different light spectrum conditions - red light, blue light, shaded light and darkness - during their first 16 days after emerging from pupae. We found that the light environment experienced during early adulthood affected mating frequency and, in some cases, the latency to copulate, but not copulation duration. Males exposed to any of the three light treatments (red, blue or shaded light) were more frequently chosen as mating partners than dark-reared males. Flies reared under dark conditions exhibited the lowest mating performance out of any of the rearing environments. Under field cage conditions, a slight assortative mating between blue-and red-light-reared flies was detected. Additionally, females reared in blue light and darkness mated less compared with females reared in red and shaded light. Our data demonstrate that male mating behaviour is flexible in response to light environment. The findings suggest that light spectrum only weakly affects the direction of sexual selection by female choice; however, dark rearing environments deeply affect mating success. © 2011. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

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