Programa de Pos Graduacao em Bioquimica Toxicologica

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Programa de Pos Graduacao em Bioquimica Toxicologica

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
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D'avila L.F.,Federal University of Santa Maria | Dias V.T.,Federal University of Santa Maria | Vey L.T.,Programa de Pos Graduacao em Bioquimica Toxicologica | Milanesi L.H.,Federal University of Santa Maria | And 5 more authors.
Toxicology Letters | Year: 2017

In recent years, interesterified fat (IF) has been used to replace hydrogenated vegetable fat (HVF), rich in trans isomers, being found in processed foods. Studies involving IF have shown deleterious influences on the metabolic system, similarly to HVF, whereas no studies regarding its influence on the central nervous system (CNS) were performed. Rats from first generation born and maintained under supplementation (3 g/Kg, p.o.) of soybean-oil or IF until adulthood were assessed on memory, biochemical and molecular markers in the hippocampus. IF group showed higher saturated fatty acids and linoleic acid and lower docosahexaenoic acid incorporation in the hippocampus. In addition, IF supplementation impaired short and long-term memory, which were related to increased reactive species generation and protein carbonyl levels, decreased catalase activity, BDNF and TrkB levels in the hippocampus. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to show that lifelong IF consumption may be related to brain oxidative damage, memory impairments and neurotrophins modifications, which collectively may be present indifferent neurological disorders. In fact, the use of IF in foods was intended to avoid damage from HVF consumption; however this substitute should be urgently reviewed, since this fat can be as harmful as trans fat. © 2017 Elsevier B.V.


Menezes C.,Programa de Pos Graduacao em Biodiversidade Animal | Menezes C.,Federal University of Santa Maria | Marins A.,Programa de Pos Graduacao em Biodiversidade Animal | Murussi C.,Programa de Pos Graduacao em Bioquimica Toxicologica | And 6 more authors.
Science of the Total Environment | Year: 2016

The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of dietary diphenyl diselenide [(PhSe)2] at different concentrations (1.5, 3.0, and 5.0 mg/kg) on growth, oxidative damage and antioxidant parameters in silver catfish after 30 and 60 days. Fish fed with 5.0 mg/kg of (PhSe)2 experienced a significant decrease in weight, length, and condition factor after 30 days and these parameters increased after 60 days. Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and protein carbonyl (PC) decreased in the liver of silver catfish supplemented with (PhSe)2 after 30 days at all concentrations, while after 60 days these parameters decreased in liver, gills, brain, and muscle. Supplementationwith (PhSe)2 induced a decrease in catalase (CAT) activity from liver only after 60 days of feeding. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) decreased at 5.0 mg/kg after 30 and 60 days and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) was enhanced at 1.5 and 3.0 mg/kg after 30 and 60 days. Silver catfish supplemented for 30 days showed a significant increase in liver glutathione S-transferase (GST) at 3.0 mg/kg, while after 60 days GST activity increased in liver at 1.5, 3.0, and 5.0 mg/kg and in gills at 3.0 and 5.0 mg/kg of (PhSe)2. After 30 days, non-protein thiols (NPSH) did not change, while after 60 days NPSH increased in liver, gills, brain, and muscle. In addition, ascorbic acid (AA) levels after 30 days increased in liver at three concentrations and in gills and muscle at 1.5 mg/kg,while after 60 days, AA increased at all concentrations in all and tissues tested. Thus, diet supplemented with (PhSe)2 for 60 days could be more effective for silver catfish. Although the concentration of 5.0 mg/kg showed decreased growth parameters, concentrations of 1.5 and 3.0 mg/kg, in general, decreased oxidative damage and increased antioxidant defenses. © 2015.


De Menezes C.C.,Programa de Pos Graduacao em Bioquimica Toxicologica | Leitemperger J.,Programa de Pos Graduacao em Bioquimica Toxicologica | Santi A.,Programa de Pos Graduacao em Bioquimica Toxicologica | Lopes T.,Programa de Pos Graduacao em Bioquimica Toxicologica | And 6 more authors.
Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety | Year: 2012

The occurrence of pollutants in the aquatic environment can produce severe toxic effects on non-target organisms, including fish. These sources of contamination are numerous and include herbicides, which represent a large group of toxic chemicals. Quinclorac, an herbicide widely applied in agriculture, induces oxidative stress due to free radical generation and changes in the antioxidant defense system. The aim of this study was to assess if dietary diphenyl diselenide (PhSe)2 has a protective effect in tissues of fish species Cyprinus carpio exposed to the quinclorac herbicide. The fish were fed with either a standard or a diet containing 3.0mg/Kg of diphenyl diselenide for 60d. After were exposed to 1mg/L of Facet® (quinclorac commercial formulation) for 192h. At the end of the experimental period, parameters as thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance levels (TBARS), protein carbonyl, catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione S-transferase (GST), nonprotein thiols (NPSH) and ascorbic acid in the liver, gills, brain and muscle were evaluated in Cyprinus carpio. In fish exposed to quinclorac and feeding with standard diet TBARS levels increased in liver and gills. However, SOD activity decreases in liver whereas no alterations were observed in catalase activity in this tissue. Quinclorac also decrease GST activity in liver and brain, NPSH in brain and muscle and ascorbic acid in muscle. Concerning protein carbonyl exposed to herbicide the fish did not show any alterations. The diphenyl diselenide supplemented diet reversed these effects, preventing increases in TBARS levels in liver and gills. GST activity was recovered to control values in liver. NPSH levels in brain and muscle increased remain near to control values. These results indicated that dietary diphenyl diselenide protects tissues against quinclorac induced oxidative stress ameliorating the antioxidant properties. © 2012 Elsevier Inc..


Menezes C.,Programa de Pos Graduacao em Bioquimica Toxicologica | Menezes C.,Federal University of Santa Maria | Leitemperger J.,Programa de Pos Graduacao em Bioquimica Toxicologica | Leitemperger J.,Federal University of Santa Maria | And 12 more authors.
Environmental Toxicology and Pharmacology | Year: 2013

The study investigated the capacity of diphenyl diselenide [(PhSe)2] (3.0mg/kg), on reduce the oxidative damage in liver, gills and muscle of carp and silver catfish exposed to clomazone (192h). Silver catfish exposed to clomazone showed increased thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance (TBARS) in liver and muscle and protein carbonyl in liver and gills. Furthermore, clomazone in silver catfish decrease non-protein thiols (NPSH) in liver and gills and glutathione peroxidase and ascorbic acid in liver. (PhSe)2 reversed the effects caused by clomazone in silver catfish, preventing increases in TBARS and protein carbonyl. Moreover, NPSH and ascorbic acid were increased by values near control. The results suggest that (PhSe)2 attenuated the oxidative damage induced by clomazone in silver catfish. The clomazone no caused an apparent situation of oxidative stress in carp, showing that this species is more resistant to this toxicant. Altogether, the containing (PhSe)2 diet helps fish to increase antioxidants defenses. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.


PubMed | Programa de Pos Graduacao em Bioquimica Toxicologica
Type: | Journal: Ecotoxicology and environmental safety | Year: 2012

The occurrence of pollutants in the aquatic environment can produce severe toxic effects on non-target organisms, including fish. These sources of contamination are numerous and include herbicides, which represent a large group of toxic chemicals. Quinclorac, an herbicide widely applied in agriculture, induces oxidative stress due to free radical generation and changes in the antioxidant defense system. The aim of this study was to assess if dietary diphenyl diselenide (PhSe) has a protective effect in tissues of fish species Cyprinus carpio exposed to the quinclorac herbicide. The fish were fed with either a standard or a diet containing 3.0 mg/Kg of diphenyl diselenide for 60 d. After were exposed to 1 mg/L of Facet (quinclorac commercial formulation) for 192 h. At the end of the experimental period, parameters as thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance levels (TBARS), protein carbonyl, catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione S-transferase (GST), nonprotein thiols (NPSH) and ascorbic acid in the liver, gills, brain and muscle were evaluated in Cyprinus carpio. In fish exposed to quinclorac and feeding with standard diet TBARS levels increased in liver and gills. However, SOD activity decreases in liver whereas no alterations were observed in catalase activity in this tissue. Quinclorac also decrease GST activity in liver and brain, NPSH in brain and muscle and ascorbic acid in muscle. Concerning protein carbonyl exposed to herbicide the fish did not show any alterations. The diphenyl diselenide supplemented diet reversed these effects, preventing increases in TBARS levels in liver and gills. GST activity was recovered to control values in liver. NPSH levels in brain and muscle increased remain near to control values. These results indicated that dietary diphenyl diselenide protects tissues against quinclorac induced oxidative stress ameliorating the antioxidant properties.

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