Program in Lung Cell Biology and Translational Research

and Sleep, United States

Program in Lung Cell Biology and Translational Research

and Sleep, United States
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Malur A.,Program in Lung Cell Biology and Translational Research | Baker A.D.,Program in Lung Cell Biology and Translational Research | McCoy A.J.,Program in Lung Cell Biology and Translational Research | Wells G.,East Carolina University | And 5 more authors.
American Journal of Physiology - Lung Cellular and Molecular Physiology | Year: 2011

Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a lung disease characterized by a deficiency of functional granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) resulting in surfactant accumulation and lipidengorged alveolar macrophages. GM-CSF is a positive regulator of PPARγ that is constitutively expressed in healthy alveolar macrophages. We previously reported decreased PPARγ and ATP-binding cassette transporter G1 (ABCG1) levels in alveolar macrophages from PAP patients and GM-CSF knockout (KO) mice, suggesting PPARγ and ABCG1 involvement in surfactant catabolism. Because ABCG1 represents a PPARγ target, we hypothesized that PPARγ restoration would increase ABCG1 and reduce macrophage lipid accumulation. Upregulation of PPARγ was achieved using a lentivirus expression system in vivo. GM-CSF KO mice received intratracheal instillation of lentivirus (lenti)-PPARγ or control lenti-eGFP. Ten days postinstillation, 79% of harvested alveolar macrophages expressed eGFP, demonstrating transduction. Alveolar macrophages showed increased PPARγ and ABCG1 expression after lenti-PPARγ instillation, whereas PPARγ and ABCG1 levels remained unchanged in lentieGFP controls. Alveolar macrophages from lenti-PPARγ- treated mice also exhibited reduced intracellular phospholipids and increased cholesterol efflux to HDL, an ABCG1-mediated pathway. In vivo instillation of lenti-PPARγ results in: 1) upregulating ABCG1 and PPARγ expression of GM-CSF KO alveolar macrophages, 2) reducing intracellular lipid accumulation, and 3) increasing cholesterol efflux activity. Copyright © 2011 the American Physiological Society.

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