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Gent, Belgium

Daguet D.,NEXIRA SAS | Pinheiro I.,ProDigest BVBA | Verhelst A.,ProDigest BVBA | Possemiers S.,ProDigest BVBA | Marzorati M.,Ghent University
Agro Food Industry Hi-Tech | Year: 2015

The Leaky Gut Syndrome - impairment of the gut wall functionality - is involved in many inflammatory diseases, among them IBS. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of arabinogalactan (AG) and fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS) on gut wall modulation using a Simulator of the Human Intestinal Microbial Ecosystem (SHIME®) - inoculated with faecal material from an IBS donor - coupled with co-cultures of enterocytes and macrophages (transwell approach using Caco-2 and THP1 cells). AG and FOS showed a different fermentation profile (more proximal for FOS and distal for AG) and both fibres exerted a potential positive effect on gut barrier (increased TEER parameter) and inflammation (modulation of cytokines IL-8, IL-6, IL-10 and NF-κB) in their main area of fermentation. AG could be an interesting nutritional supplement for the treatment of those conditions characterized by inflammation and increased permeability in the distal colon. Source


Daguet D.,NEXIRA SAS | Pinheiro I.,ProDigest BVBA | Verhelst A.,ProDigest BVBA | Possemiers S.,ProDigest BVBA | Marzorati M.,Ghent University
Journal of Functional Foods | Year: 2016

Impaired gut epithelium functionalities coupled with microbial dysbiosis contribute to the development of diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Functional foods represent an interesting possibility to modulate the gut microbiota and hence the gut barrier functionality. The effect of arabinogalactan (AG) and fructooligosaccharides (FOS) has been studied in a Simulator of the Human Intestinal Microbial Ecosystem (SHIME®) - inoculated with faecal material from an IBD patient - coupled with co-cultures of enterocyte-like cells (Caco-2) and macrophages (THP1). AG and FOS showed a different fermentation profile in the colon (proximal for FOS, distal for AG) and both fibres exerted a potential positive effect on gut barrier and inflammation. AG showed a significantly higher transepithelial electrical resistance of Caco-2 cells, decreased NF-κB activity and increased IL-10 production. These results suggest that AG could be an interesting supplement for those conditions characterized by inflammation and increased permeability in the distal colon. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. Source


Trademark
Ghent University and Prodigest Bvba | Date: 2012-08-28

Laboratory apparatus, namely, centrifuges, furnaces for laboratory use, homogenizers, spectroscopes and incubators; apparatus and instruments for scientific research and food analysis, namely, bio-chips for scientific research purposes, diagnostic apparatus for testing of food, laser scanners for industrial inspection, plates, glass slides or chips having multi-well arrays that can be used in chemical analysis, biological analysis or patterning for scientific research use. Scientific and technological services and research and design relating thereto, namely, scientific research, scientific consultancy regarding food products, design and testing of new products for others; biological, bacteriological and chemical research. Consultancy in the field of healthcare and medical care.


Chen H.,University of Sichuan | Chen H.,Ghent University | Wang W.,Ghent University | Degroote J.,Ghent University | And 4 more authors.
Journal of Nutrition | Year: 2015

Background: The effect of dietary fiber on intestinal function primarily has been ascribed to its interaction with intestinal bacteria in the hindgut, whereas changes in intestinal bacteria in the host have been considered to depend on fiber composition. Objectives: The objectives of this study were to determine the contribution of the major fiber components to the healthpromoting effects of wheat bran on intestinal mucosal barrier function and to elucidate the involvement of microbiota changes in weaned piglets. Methods: Thirty freshly weaned male piglets were assigned to 5 dietary treatment groups (n = 6) according to litter and weight. The piglets consumed synthetic diets ad libitum for 30 d, including a basal control diet (CON) without fiber components, a wheat bran diet (WB) as reference diet (10% wheat bran), and 3 other diets containing amounts of fiber components equivalent to those in the WB, i.e., an arabinoxylan diet (AX), a cellulose diet (CEL), and a combined arabinoxylan and cellulose diet (CB). Results: The groups consuming diets containing arabinoxylans (i.e., the WB, AX, and CB groups) had increased intestinal secretory immunoglobulin A concentrations, goblet cell number and cecal short-chain fatty acid concentrations, and reduced branched-chain fatty acid concentrations and pH values compared with the CON group. In the WB group, the stimulated secretion of Cl- was suppressed (60.8% and 47.5% change in short-circuit current caused by theophylline and carbachol, respectively) in the distal small intestine compared with the CON group. The AX and CB groups also had increased intestinal alkaline phosphatase activities and reduced intestinal transcellular permeability (by 77.3% and 67.2%, respectively) compared with the CON group. Meanwhile, in the WB group, cecal Bacteroidetes and Enterobacteriaceae populations were lower, and the growth of Lactobacillus was higher in the AX and CB groups than in the CON group, whereas no positive effect on intestinal barrier function was observed in the CEL group. Conclusion: Arabinoxylan in wheat bran, and not cellulose, is mainly responsible for improving various functional components of the intestinal barrier function and the involvement of microbiota changes. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition. Source


Terpend K.,NEXIRA SAS BRAM | Possemiers S.,ProDigest BVBA | Possemiers S.,Ghent University | Daguet D.,NEXIRA SAS | Marzorati M.,Ghent University
Environmental Microbiology Reports | Year: 2013

Current prebiotics, such as fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS), are limited in their persistence in the distal colon and are predominantly fermented in the proximal colon. In order to identify a potential alternative, the differences in the fermentation profile of arabinogalactan (AG) and FOS have been assessed in the Simulator of the Human Intestinal Microbial Ecosystem. The effect of each product on the composition and activity of the microbial community was analysed during a 3-week treatment period at a dose of 5g day-1. While FOS indeed was mainly fermented in the simulated proximal colon, AG was still available for fermentation in the simulated distal colon as shown by pH profiles, size exclusion chromatography and analyses of specific enzymatic activities. As a consequence, the main effect of the products (increase in propionate and butyrate and decrease in ammonium production) occurred in different intestinal areas. DGGE and qPCR analyses confirmed that the main modulation of the microbiota by the two products occurred in different areas of the gut. AG was associated with a statistically significant increase in the concentration of total bacteria, Bacteroidetes, Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, a delayed bifidogenic effect and a decrease of the pathogenic Clostridium perfringens. FOS led to a strong lactobacillogenic effect. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology. Source

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