ProDigest BVBA

Gent, Belgium

ProDigest BVBA

Gent, Belgium
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Devriese S.,Ghent University | van Den Bossche L.,Ghent University | van Welden S.,Ghent University | Holvoet T.,Ghent University | And 4 more authors.
Histochemistry and Cell Biology | Year: 2017

Colonic adenocarcinoma-derived Caco-2 and T84 epithelial cell lines are frequently used as in vitro model systems of functional epithelial barriers. Both are utilised interchangeably despite evidence that differentiated Caco-2 cells are more reminiscent of small intestinal enterocytes than of colonocytes, whereas differentiated T84 cells are less well characterised. The aim of this study was, therefore, to further characterise and compare differentiated Caco-2 and T84 cells. The objectives were to (1) compare the brush border morphology, (2) measure the expression of enterocyte- and colonocyte-specific genes and (3) compare their response to butyrate, which is dependent on the monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1), an apical protein expressed primarily in colonocytes. T84 microvilli were significantly shorter than those of Caco-2 cells, which is a characteristic difference between small intestinal enterocytes and colonocytes. Also, enterocyte-associated brush border enzymes expressed in differentiated Caco-2 cells were not increased during T84 maturation, whereas colonic markers such as MCT1 were more abundant in differentiated T84 cells compared to differentiated Caco-2 cells. Consequently, T84 cells displayed a dose-responsive improvement of barrier function towards butyrate, which was absent in Caco-2 cells. On the other hand, differences in epithelial toll-like receptor expression between Caco-2 and T84 monolayers did not result in a corresponding differential functional response. We conclude that differentiated Caco-2 and T84 cells have distinct morphological, biochemical and functional characteristics, suggesting that T84 cells do not acquire the biochemical signature of mature small intestinal enterocytes like Caco-2 cells, but retain much of their original colonic characteristics throughout differentiation. These findings can help investigators select the appropriate intestinal epithelial cell line for specific in vitro research purposes. © 2017 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg


Garcia-Villalba R.,CSIC - Center of Edafology and Applied Biology of the Segura | Vissenaekens H.,Ghent University | Pitart J.,ProDigest BVBA | Romo-Vaquero M.,CSIC - Center of Edafology and Applied Biology of the Segura | And 8 more authors.
Journal of agricultural and food chemistry | Year: 2017

A TWIN-SHIME system was used to compare the metabolism of pomegranate polyphenols by the gut microbiota from two individuals with different urolithin metabotypes. Gut microbiota, ellagitannin metabolism, short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), transport of metabolites, and phase II metabolism using Caco-2 cells were explored. The simulation reproduced the in vivo metabolic profiles for each metabotype. The study shows for the first time that microbial composition, metabolism of ellagitannins, and SCFA differ between metabotypes and along the large intestine. The assay also showed that pomegranate phenolics preserved intestinal cell integrity. Pomegranate polyphenols enhanced urolithin and propionate production, as well as Akkermansia and Gordonibacter prevalence with the highest effect in the descending colon. The system provides an insight into the mechanisms of pomegranate polyphenol gut microbiota metabolism and absorption through intestinal cells. The results obtained by the combined SHIME/Caco-2 cell system are consistent with previous human and animal studies and show that although urolithin metabolites are present along the gastrointestinal tract due to enterohepatic circulation, they are predominantly produced in the distal colon region.


Filip R.,Institute of Rural Health | Filip R.,Warsaw University of Life Sciences | Possemiers S.,Ghent University | Possemiers S.,BioActor | And 8 more authors.
Journal of Nutrition, Health and Aging | Year: 2014

Objectives: Osteoporosis is a skeletal disorder characterized by impaired bone turnover and compromised bone strength, thereby predisposing to increased risk of fracture. Preclinical research has shown that compounds produced by the olive tree (Olea europaea), may protect from bone loss, by increasing osteoblast activity at the expense of adipocyte formation. The aim of this exploratory study was to obtain a first insight on the effect of intake of an olive extract on bone turnover in postmenopausal women with decreased bone mass (osteopenia).Design and setting: For that, a double blind, placebo-controlled study was performed in which participants were randomly allocated to either treatment or placebo groups.Participants: 64 osteopenic patients, with a mean bone mineral density (BMD) T-score between −1.5 and −2.5 in the lumbar spine (L2–L4) were included in the study.Intervention and measurements: Participants received for 12 months daily either 250 mg/day of olive extract and 1000 mg Ca (treatment) or 1000 mg Ca alone (placebo). Primary endpoints consisted of evaluation of bone turnover markers. Secondary endpoints included BMD measurements and blood lipid profiles.Results: After 12 months, the levels of the pro-osteoblastic marker osteocalcin were found to significantly increase in the treatment group as compared to placebo. Simultaneously, BMD decreased in the placebo group, while remaining stable in the treatment group. In addition, improved lipid profiles were observed, with significant decrease in total- and LDL-cholesterol in the treatment group.Conclusion: This exploratory study supports preclinical observations and warrants further research by showing that a specific olive polyphenol extract (Bonolive®) affects serum osteocalcin levels and may stabilize lumbar spine BMD. Moreover, the improved blood lipid profiles suggest additional health benefits associated to the intake of the olive polyphenol extract. © 2014, Serdi and Springer-Verlag France.


Terpend K.,NEXIRA SAS BRAM | Possemiers S.,ProDigest BVBA | Possemiers S.,Ghent University | Daguet D.,NEXIRA SAS | Marzorati M.,Ghent University
Environmental Microbiology Reports | Year: 2013

Current prebiotics, such as fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS), are limited in their persistence in the distal colon and are predominantly fermented in the proximal colon. In order to identify a potential alternative, the differences in the fermentation profile of arabinogalactan (AG) and FOS have been assessed in the Simulator of the Human Intestinal Microbial Ecosystem. The effect of each product on the composition and activity of the microbial community was analysed during a 3-week treatment period at a dose of 5g day-1. While FOS indeed was mainly fermented in the simulated proximal colon, AG was still available for fermentation in the simulated distal colon as shown by pH profiles, size exclusion chromatography and analyses of specific enzymatic activities. As a consequence, the main effect of the products (increase in propionate and butyrate and decrease in ammonium production) occurred in different intestinal areas. DGGE and qPCR analyses confirmed that the main modulation of the microbiota by the two products occurred in different areas of the gut. AG was associated with a statistically significant increase in the concentration of total bacteria, Bacteroidetes, Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, a delayed bifidogenic effect and a decrease of the pathogenic Clostridium perfringens. FOS led to a strong lactobacillogenic effect. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.


Daguet D.,NEXIRA SAS | Pinheiro I.,ProDigest BVBA | Verhelst A.,ProDigest BVBA | Possemiers S.,ProDigest BVBA | Marzorati M.,Ghent University
Agro Food Industry Hi-Tech | Year: 2015

The Leaky Gut Syndrome - impairment of the gut wall functionality - is involved in many inflammatory diseases, among them IBS. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of arabinogalactan (AG) and fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS) on gut wall modulation using a Simulator of the Human Intestinal Microbial Ecosystem (SHIME®) - inoculated with faecal material from an IBS donor - coupled with co-cultures of enterocytes and macrophages (transwell approach using Caco-2 and THP1 cells). AG and FOS showed a different fermentation profile (more proximal for FOS and distal for AG) and both fibres exerted a potential positive effect on gut barrier (increased TEER parameter) and inflammation (modulation of cytokines IL-8, IL-6, IL-10 and NF-κB) in their main area of fermentation. AG could be an interesting nutritional supplement for the treatment of those conditions characterized by inflammation and increased permeability in the distal colon.


Chen H.,University of Sichuan | Chen H.,Ghent University | Wang W.,Ghent University | Degroote J.,Ghent University | And 4 more authors.
Journal of Nutrition | Year: 2015

Background: The effect of dietary fiber on intestinal function primarily has been ascribed to its interaction with intestinal bacteria in the hindgut, whereas changes in intestinal bacteria in the host have been considered to depend on fiber composition. Objectives: The objectives of this study were to determine the contribution of the major fiber components to the healthpromoting effects of wheat bran on intestinal mucosal barrier function and to elucidate the involvement of microbiota changes in weaned piglets. Methods: Thirty freshly weaned male piglets were assigned to 5 dietary treatment groups (n = 6) according to litter and weight. The piglets consumed synthetic diets ad libitum for 30 d, including a basal control diet (CON) without fiber components, a wheat bran diet (WB) as reference diet (10% wheat bran), and 3 other diets containing amounts of fiber components equivalent to those in the WB, i.e., an arabinoxylan diet (AX), a cellulose diet (CEL), and a combined arabinoxylan and cellulose diet (CB). Results: The groups consuming diets containing arabinoxylans (i.e., the WB, AX, and CB groups) had increased intestinal secretory immunoglobulin A concentrations, goblet cell number and cecal short-chain fatty acid concentrations, and reduced branched-chain fatty acid concentrations and pH values compared with the CON group. In the WB group, the stimulated secretion of Cl- was suppressed (60.8% and 47.5% change in short-circuit current caused by theophylline and carbachol, respectively) in the distal small intestine compared with the CON group. The AX and CB groups also had increased intestinal alkaline phosphatase activities and reduced intestinal transcellular permeability (by 77.3% and 67.2%, respectively) compared with the CON group. Meanwhile, in the WB group, cecal Bacteroidetes and Enterobacteriaceae populations were lower, and the growth of Lactobacillus was higher in the AX and CB groups than in the CON group, whereas no positive effect on intestinal barrier function was observed in the CEL group. Conclusion: Arabinoxylan in wheat bran, and not cellulose, is mainly responsible for improving various functional components of the intestinal barrier function and the involvement of microbiota changes. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.


Possemiers S.,Ghent University | Pinheiro I.,ProDigest BVBA | Verhelst A.,ProDigest BVBA | Van Den Abbeele P.,Ghent University | And 8 more authors.
Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry | Year: 2013

EpiCor, derived from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has been shown to have immunomodulating properties in human clinical trials and in vitro. However, the underlying mechanisms behind its immune protection via the gut remain largely unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to use an integrated in vitro approach to evaluate the metabolism of EpiCor by the intestinal microflora, its modulating effect on the gut microbiota, and its anti-inflammatory activity on human-derived cell lines. Using the SHIME model, in combination with a mucus adhesion assay, has shown that low doses of EpiCor have a prebiotic-like modulatory effect on the luminal- and mucosa-associated microbiota. These include gradual changes in general community structure, reduction of potential pathogens, quantitative increase in lactobacilli, and qualitative modulation of bifidobacteria. Moreover, by combination of the SHIME with Caco-2 cells and Caco-2/THP1 cocultures, a significant decrease in proinflammatory cytokines was observed at the end of the treatment period. © 2013 American Chemical Society.


Daguet D.,NEXIRA SAS | Pinheiro I.,ProDigest BVBA | Verhelst A.,ProDigest BVBA | Possemiers S.,ProDigest BVBA | Marzorati M.,Ghent University
Journal of Functional Foods | Year: 2016

Impaired gut epithelium functionalities coupled with microbial dysbiosis contribute to the development of diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Functional foods represent an interesting possibility to modulate the gut microbiota and hence the gut barrier functionality. The effect of arabinogalactan (AG) and fructooligosaccharides (FOS) has been studied in a Simulator of the Human Intestinal Microbial Ecosystem (SHIME®) - inoculated with faecal material from an IBD patient - coupled with co-cultures of enterocyte-like cells (Caco-2) and macrophages (THP1). AG and FOS showed a different fermentation profile in the colon (proximal for FOS, distal for AG) and both fibres exerted a potential positive effect on gut barrier and inflammation. AG showed a significantly higher transepithelial electrical resistance of Caco-2 cells, decreased NF-κB activity and increased IL-10 production. These results suggest that AG could be an interesting supplement for those conditions characterized by inflammation and increased permeability in the distal colon. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.


Trademark
Ghent University and Prodigest Bvba | Date: 2012-08-28

Laboratory apparatus, namely, centrifuges, furnaces for laboratory use, homogenizers, spectroscopes and incubators; apparatus and instruments for scientific research and food analysis, namely, bio-chips for scientific research purposes, diagnostic apparatus for testing of food, laser scanners for industrial inspection, plates, glass slides or chips having multi-well arrays that can be used in chemical analysis, biological analysis or patterning for scientific research use. Scientific and technological services and research and design relating thereto, namely, scientific research, scientific consultancy regarding food products, design and testing of new products for others; biological, bacteriological and chemical research. Consultancy in the field of healthcare and medical care.


PubMed | University of Sichuan, ProDigest BVBA and Ghent University
Type: Journal Article | Journal: The Journal of nutrition | Year: 2014

The effect of dietary fiber on intestinal function primarily has been ascribed to its interaction with intestinal bacteria in the hindgut, whereas changes in intestinal bacteria in the host have been considered to depend on fiber composition.The objectives of this study were to determine the contribution of the major fiber components to the health-promoting effects of wheat bran on intestinal mucosal barrier function and to elucidate the involvement of microbiota changes in weaned piglets.Thirty freshly weaned male piglets were assigned to 5 dietary treatment groups (n = 6) according to litter and weight. The piglets consumed synthetic diets ad libitum for 30 d, including a basal control diet (CON) without fiber components, a wheat bran diet (WB) as reference diet (10% wheat bran), and 3 other diets containing amounts of fiber components equivalent to those in the WB, i.e., an arabinoxylan diet (AX), a cellulose diet (CEL), and a combined arabinoxylan and cellulose diet (CB).The groups consuming diets containing arabinoxylans (i.e., the WB, AX, and CB groups) had increased intestinal secretory immunoglobulin A concentrations, goblet cell number and cecal short-chain fatty acid concentrations, and reduced branched-chain fatty acid concentrations and pH values compared with the CON group. In the WB group, the stimulated secretion of Cl(-) was suppressed (60.8% and 47.5% change in short-circuit current caused by theophylline and carbachol, respectively) in the distal small intestine compared with the CON group. The AX and CB groups also had increased intestinal alkaline phosphatase activities and reduced intestinal transcellular permeability (by 77.3% and 67.2%, respectively) compared with the CON group. Meanwhile, in the WB group, cecal Bacteroidetes and Enterobacteriaceae populations were lower, and the growth of Lactobacillus was higher in the AX and CB groups than in the CON group, whereas no positive effect on intestinal barrier function was observed in the CEL group.Arabinoxylan in wheat bran, and not cellulose, is mainly responsible for improving various functional components of the intestinal barrier function and the involvement of microbiota changes.

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