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Berardesca E.,San Gallicano Dermatological Institute | Maibach H.I.,University of California at San Francisco | Wilhelm K.-P.,proDERM Institute for Applied Dermatological Research
Non Invasive Diagnostic Techniques in Clinical Dermatology | Year: 2014

This book is a comprehensive but compact guide to the latest technical and technological developments in the growing field of non invasive diagnosis in clinical dermatology. Information is provided on the practical and technical characteristics of a wide range of equipment and methods for in vivo measurements that aid in the investigation of skin function, the evaluation of topically applied products and the monitoring of skin disease. Individual sections are devoted to imaging techniques, skin analysis, superficial skin analysis, skin mechanics, water and stratum corneum hydration and erythema and blood flow. All of the authors are experts in the field, with detailed knowledge of the techniques they describe. Non Invasive Diagnostic Techniques in Clinical Dermatology will be of value for all dermatologists, whether they are engaged in delivering patient care or in research programs, for cosmetic scientists and for biologists involved in skin research and product assessment. © Springer Berlin Heidelberg 2014.


Tan J.,University of Western Ontario | Tan J.,INC Research | Blume-Peytavi U.,Charité - Medical University of Berlin | Ortonne J.P.,Service de Dermatologie Hopital lArchet Cedex 3 | And 6 more authors.
British Journal of Dermatology | Year: 2013

Background Few studies have evaluated differences between rosacea subtypes in epidemiological associations and clinical features. The natural history of rosacea is unknown and progression between subtypes has been implied but not formally evaluated. Objectives To assess associations between the four rosacea subtypes [erythematotelangiectatic (ETR), papulopustular (PPR), phymatous (PHY) and ocular], including quantitative and qualitative details on primary and secondary features of rosacea. A secondary objective was to evaluate for the potential of progression between subtypes. Methods This cross-sectional study recruited subjects with rosacea from Northern Germany and comprised clinical evaluation by a dermatologist and a survey of demographics and onset of rosacea-associated signs and symptoms. Results A total of 135 subjects with rosacea were enrolled. PHY was more frequently associated with PPR than ETR (P < 0·001). Compared with ETR, PPR was significantly associated with facial burning/stinging (P = 0·001), phymas (P < 0·001) and oedema (P < 0·001); and during flushing episodes, was more frequently associated with burning (P = 0·018), skin tension (P = 0·005) and itching (P = 0·027). ETR was more frequently associated with dry facial skin (P < 0·001). Flushing was reported by 66% and the site most frequently involved was the cheeks (100%). Papulopustules were evanescent in 42% and the sites most frequently involved were the cheeks (80%) and nose (67%). Of those fulfilling criteria for at least two subtypes, 66% developed ETR before PPR; 92% developed ETR before PHY; 83% developed PPR before PHY; and the majority developed cutaneous rosacea-associated features before ocular signs/symptoms. Conclusions Significant differences exist between ETR and PPR in rosacea-associated features and in subtype associations. A small proportion of subjects with rosacea may progress between subtypes. What's already known about this topic? Rosacea has been categorized into three cutaneous and one ocular subtype based on primary and secondary clinical features. There is speculation but little data in the literature regarding associations between primary and secondary clinical features and rosacea subtypes, qualitative and quantitative aspects of primary and secondary rosacea-associated features, and progression between rosacea subtypes. What does this study add? This study provides quantitative details on frequency, duration and location of evanescent primary rosacea-associated features - flushing and papulopustules. It demonstrates significant associations in papulopustular rosacea (PPR) with facial burning/stinging, oedema and phymas compared with erythematotelangiectatic rosacea (ETR). During flushing episodes, PPR was more frequently associated with burning, skin tension and itching compared with ETR. Subtype progression was observed in a small proportion of subjects, with ETR progressing to PPR and phymatous rosacea, and PPR progressing to phymatous rosacea. Ocular symptoms developed after rosacea-associated cutaneous features in the majority. © 2013 British Association of Dermatologists.


Bielfeldt S.,ProDERM Institute for Applied Dermatological Research | Rock C.,ProDERM Institute for Applied Dermatological Research | Wilhelm K.-P.,ProDERM Institute for Applied Dermatological Research | Wilhelm K.-P.,University of Lübeck
International Journal of Cosmetic Science | Year: 2013

Synopsis While sun protection factor (SPF) and UVA protection are the most important determinants of a cosmetic sunscreen product, water resistance is the third important feature. The Colipa in vivo method is the internationally accepted standard method to assess water resistance. It is time-consuming and expensive. A screening method to quickly predict water resistance properties on low cost therefore is a specific request of product developers. Several in vitro screening methods are published but the predictive power of all these methods is limited. In this paper, we describe an adaptation of the in vitro UVA protection method of Colipa for a water resistance screening. Although the method is quick and most parts are standardized and approved by Colipa, the results were not in advantage of other published screening methods. Taking into account, the scatter of the results, seven of 16 sunscreen products that were developed as water resistant formulations could be unambiguously estimated to be water resistant by the in vivo water resistance screening method on five subjects while nine failed. In 10 of these 16 results, the in vitro SPF-based method was in accordance with in vivo findings, whereas in six cases, the method was not predicting correctly. Based on these results, the authors recommend to use the in vitro screening methods to pre-select from candidates which cannot all be tested in vivo. The pre-selected products can be screened in the Colipa in vivo water resistance method with a reduced number of volunteers (usually 5) to predict water resistance. In case, the water resistance estimated in such an in vivo screening is found at about 65% or higher the study can be deemed successful and completed with further subjects to fulfil the Colipa requirements. © 2012 Society of Cosmetic Scientists.


Stettler H.,Bayer AG | Kurka P.,Bayer AG | Lunau N.,proDERM Institute for Applied Dermatological Research | Manger C.,proDERM Institute for Applied Dermatological Research | And 7 more authors.
Journal of Dermatological Treatment | Year: 2016

Purpose: Two randomized, intra-individual comparison studies were performed in healthy subjects to evaluate the skin moisturization and barrier restoration potential of a new topical panthenol-containing emollient (NTP-CE) (Study 1), and its effect on skin microflora (Study 2). Methods: In Study 1 (N = 23), two skin areas, one challenged with 0.5% sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) solution and one unchallenged, were treated with NTP-CE for 3 weeks. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL), skin hydration, and intercellular lipid lamellae (ICLL) organization were measured at regular intervals during the study. In Study 2 (N = 20), quantitative bacterial cultures were obtained over 6 h from a skin area undergoing wash stress with 10% SDS with subsequent single application of NTP-CE. Results: In Study 1, mean AUC for TEWL reduction from baseline was more pronounced with NTP-CE compared with control (−168.36 vs. −123.38 g/m2/h, p = 0.023). NTP-CE use was also associated with statistically significant improvements in stratum corneum hydration and an increase in mean ICLL length from baseline (day 22: 120.61 vs. 35.85 nm/1000 nm2, p < 0.001). In Study 2, NTP-CE use had no negative impact on bacterial viability. Conclusions: NTP-CE use has favorable and lasting effects on barrier function and repair as well as skin hydration without negatively influencing bacterial viability. © 2016 Bayer Consumer Care AG. Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group


Waring M.,Devicemark Ltd | Bielfeldt S.,ProDERM Institute for Applied Dermatological Research | Matzold K.,ProDERM Institute for Applied Dermatological Research | Wilhelm K.-P.,ProDERM Institute for Applied Dermatological Research
Skin Research and Technology | Year: 2013

Background: Chronic wounds require frequent dressing changes. Adhesive dressings used for this indication can be damaging to the stratum corneum, particularly in the elderly where the skin tends to be thinner. Understanding the level of damage caused by dressing removal can aid dressing selection. Methods: This study used a novel methodology that applied a stain to the skin and measured the intensity of that stain after repeated application and removal of a series of different adhesive types. Additionally, a traditional method of measuring skin barrier damage (transepidermal water loss) was also undertaken and compared with the staining methodology. Results: The staining methodology and measurement of transepidermal water loss differentiated the adhesive dressings, showing that silicone adhesives caused least trauma to the skin. Conclusion: The staining methodology was shown to be as effective as transepidermal water loss in detecting damage to the stratum corneum and was shown to detect disruption of the barrier earlier than the traditional technique. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.


Steiling W.,Henkel AG | Buttgereit P.,ProDERM Institute for Applied Dermatological Research | Hall B.,L'Oréal | O'Keeffe L.,Procter and Gamble | And 3 more authors.
Food and Chemical Toxicology | Year: 2012

Many cosmetic products are available in spray form. Even though the principal targets of these products are the skin and hair, spraying leads to the partitioning of the product between the target and the surrounding air. In the previous COLIPA study (Hall et al., 2007) the daily use of deodorant/antiperspirant (Deo/AP) in spray form was quantified in terms of the amount of product dispensed from the spray can, without specifically quantifying the product fraction reaching the skin during use. Results of the present study provide this additional information, necessary for a reliable safety assessment of sprayed Deo/AP products. In a novel experimental approach the information obtained from real-life movement analysis (automated motion imaging) of volunteers using their own products was integrated with the aerosol cloud sampling data obtained from the same products, leading to the computation of the product deposited on the skin. The 90th percentile values, expressed as percent deposition relative to the can weight loss after spraying, are 23.5% and 11.4% for ethanol-based and non-ethanol-based products, respectively. Additionally, the study has generated data on the skin area covered by the products, spray duration time, spray angle and spray distance from the skin. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.


Wilhelm D.,proDERM Institute for Applied Dermatological Research
Quintessence international (Berlin, Germany : 1985) | Year: 2012

The short-term and overnight effect of three treatment regimens on oral halitosis were investigated: toothbrushing with a reference toothpaste, toothbrushing with reference toothpaste and tongue cleaning, and toothbrushing and tongue cleaning with a tooth-and-tongue gel. Fifty-four subjects meeting the inclusion criteria for bad breath were enrolled in the study. All subjects received each of the three treatment regimens in a balanced design. Efficacy was assessed by organoleptic ratings and volatile sulfur compound (VSC) measurements 5 and 60 minutes after first application and overnight after 7 days of repeated use. The combination of toothbrushing and tongue cleaning with tooth-and-tongue gel provided the best results in terms of organoleptic ratings and VSC measurements at all time points compared to the other treatment regimens. The use of tooth and tongue gel for both toothbrushing and tongue cleaning showed a positive short-term and overnight effects after 7 days of use. This treatment regimen is a promising approach to control halitosis.


PubMed | proDERM Institute for Applied Dermatological Research
Type: Journal Article | Journal: International journal of cosmetic science | Year: 2013

It is well established that decorative cosmetics can enhance female facial attractiveness. In this study, we investigated the effects of a cleanser and a decent foundation on attractiveness of female faces. Comparative rating of a set of facial photographs by a group of lay persons revealed that the cleansing product was significantly reducing the attractiveness of the stimulus persons. Treatment with the foundation increased the attractiveness of the female faces clearly. The authors conclude that even unobtrusive cosmetic treatments like cleansers and light foundations may cause relevant changes of the attractiveness of female faces.


PubMed | proDERM Institute for Applied Dermatological Research
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Quintessence international (Berlin, Germany : 1985) | Year: 2012

The short-term and overnight effect of three treatment regimens on oral halitosis were investigated: toothbrushing with a reference toothpaste, toothbrushing with reference toothpaste and tongue cleaning, and toothbrushing and tongue cleaning with a tooth-and-tongue gel.Fifty-four subjects meeting the inclusion criteria for bad breath were enrolled in the study. All subjects received each of the three treatment regimens in a balanced design. Efficacy was assessed by organoleptic ratings and volatile sulfur compound (VSC) measurements 5 and 60 minutes after first application and overnight after 7 days of repeated use.The combination of toothbrushing and tongue cleaning with tooth-and-tongue gel provided the best results in terms of organoleptic ratings and VSC measurements at all time points compared to the other treatment regimens.The use of tooth and tongue gel for both toothbrushing and tongue cleaning showed a positive short-term and overnight effects after 7 days of use. This treatment regimen is a promising approach to control halitosis.


PubMed | proDERM Institute for Applied Dermatological Research
Type: Review | Journal: Skin research and technology : official journal of International Society for Bioengineering and the Skin (ISBS) [and] International Society for Digital Imaging of Skin (ISDIS) [and] International Society for Skin Imaging (ISSI) | Year: 2016

The healing of wounds has always provided challenges for the medical community whether chronic or acute. Understanding the processes which enable wounds to heal is primarily carried out by the use of models, in vitro, animal and human. It is generally accepted that the use of human models offers the best opportunity to understand the factors that influence wound healing as well as to evaluate efficacy of treatments applied to wounds.The objective of this article is to provide an overview of the different methodologies that are currently used to experimentally induce wounds of various depths in human volunteers and examines the information that may be gained from them.There is a number of human volunteer healing models available varying in their invasiveness to reflect the different possible depth levels of wounds.Currently available wound healing models include sequential tape stripping, suction blister, abrasion, laser, dermatome, and biopsy techniques. The various techniques can be utilized to induce wounds of variable depth, from removing solely the stratum corneum barrier, the epidermis to even split-thickness or full thickness wounds.Depending on the study objective, a number of models exist to study wound healing in humans. These models provide efficient and reliable results to evaluate treatment modalities.

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