Houston, MN, United States
Houston, MN, United States

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A non-occluding intravascular pump comprises a shroud providing an inlet for incoming blood flow and an outlet for outgoing blood flow, wherein the shroud is a cylindrical housing; an impeller positioned within shroud, wherein a central axis of the shroud and impeller are shared; a motor coupled to the impeller, wherein the motor rotates the impeller to causes blood to be drawn through the inlet and output to the outlet, and the motor is centrally disposed and shares the central axis with the shroud and the impeller; and a plurality of pillars coupling the motor to the shroud, wherein the pillars secure the shroud in close proximity to the impeller. Various design features of the pump may be optimized to reduce hemolysis, such as, but not limited to, inlet length, impeller design, pillar angle, and outlet design.


A method and apparatus for long-term assisting the left ventricle of a heart to pump blood is disclosed which includes at least one transluminally deliverable pump and a transluminally deliverable support structure which secures the at least one pump within the aorta for long-term use.


Fluid pressure or flow in a human body may be adjusted with circulation or perfusion systems and methods. The system may include a first pump implantable in a chamber or vessel of the human body, and a plurality of struts connected to a housing of said first pump, wherein said struts secure the first pump in a desired location of said chamber or vessel. The system may also include one or more flow modification elements disposed on said first pump, where said flow modification elements direct flow to a desired organ or a desired vessel to adjust pressure or flow as desired.


Procyrion | Entity website

Aortix(tm) is a small, continuous flow pump mounted within a self-expanding anchoring system. The device is advanced through a catheter in the femoral artery to the descending thoracic aorta ...


Procyrion | Entity website

Gerhard Gary F. Burbach Mr ...


Procyrion | Entity website

Life Science Entrepreneurs, Cardiologists, and Circulatory Support Experts


News Article | May 4, 2012
Site: www.cnet.com

With more patients needing heart transplants than there are hearts available, a tiny heart pump called a ventricular assist device (VAD) can be a lifesaver. But the pump, which is inserted into the aorta via a catheter that helps blood flow, requires wiring leads that run out of the patient's body to a battery pack, and this setup can easily result in infection. So a team of computer and electrical engineering students at Rice University have devised a method to power the VAD without wires breaking through the skin. The team used a small coil and a battery inserted a centimeter beneath the skin at waist-level, which in turn uses wires to power the VAD. They then added a belt-mounted external battery and coil that uses an alternating magnetic field to create alternating current in the subcutaneous coil, thus wirelessly charging the embedded battery. "The Rice team brought us a quick, capital- and resource-efficient proof-of-concept system to show we can power our device through [transcutaneous energy-transfer]," Rice alum Michael Cuchiara, who asked the students to work on the concept for his VAD company Procyrion, said in a school news release. "There was no reason to think we couldn't -- but until you do it, you don't have it." The team, which calls its project tCoil, admits the prototype is still a ways from development, let alone human testing. But the students' recent demonstration at the school's engineering design showcase -- where they placed the internal and external coils on either side of a baggie of lunchmeat to simulate power transfer through the skin -- won the Best Interdisciplinary Design Project prize. "The next steps will be to miniaturize it and put it in biocompatible casing," said student Tyler Young. "Once that's done, it can be implanted for large animal testing." Then Procyrion will start the process of FDA approval. Check out the team's demonstration of the prototype below:


News Article | March 25, 2014
Site: www.xconomy.com

Procyrion says it’s developed a crutch for your heart. The Houston medtech startup’s device is called Aortix, a circulatory support pump that is thinner than a pencil and can be implanted in the aorta, the major artery coming from the heart, through a catheter threaded up from the thigh through the femoral artery. The device is designed to help heart failure patients by pushing more blood through the circulatory system and on to vital organs. “The heart just needs a little bit of help,” says Will Clifton, Procyrion’s director of research and development. “We’re not replacing the function of the heart. We’re assisting the function of the heart.” Heart assist pumps aren’t new. In the 1980s, researchers developed so-called left ventricular assist devices (LVAD) that take blood from the lower chambers of a failing heart and pump it to the rest of the body. Doctors implant about 4,000 of these devices, now in their third generation of technological development, in American heart patients each year. Those LVADs are credited with prolonging the lives of patients with congestive heart failure, a disease that currently afflicts nearly six million Americans. But implanting the devices requires cracking open patients’ chests in expensive open-heart surgery. The devices also are large and cumbersome—too large to be used in some small patients. And in up to in 11 percent of patients, implanted LVADs cause strokes. Reynolds Delgado, a Texas Heart Institute cardiologist, was one of many doctors who managed the care of patients with implanted LVADs. He thought there must be a better technology. “I knew the practice had to be reduced to a catheter procedure,” he says. A good analogy, he says, is in coronary artery disease, where coronary stents inserted with catheters have reduced the need for bypass surgery. Those stents “have revolutionized treatment of [coronary artery disease] and heart attack,” Delgado says. In 2007, he had an idea for that better approach. Instead of pulling blood out of one of the ventricles, or chambers, of the heart, running it though a pump and then pulling back into an artery, he thought, why not leverage advances in micro-pump technology to place the pump directly inside an artery to give the heart a boost? “Trying to mimic what your own heart does in a machine is a lot more complicated than you would think,” Delgado explains. “Therefore, don’t try to do it. Let your heart do what it does; just assist it.” Delgado and his team built a prototype, which they named Aortix, and … Next Page » Angela Shah is the editor of Xconomy Texas. She can be reached at ashah@xconomy.com or (214) 793-5763. Follow @angelashah


News Article | March 16, 2015
Site: www.xconomy.com

Part of the value pitching in a competition at South by Southwest is getting to speak to a room packed with potential investors and users. But winning, and the prizes that come with it, never hurts. At the Hatch pitch competition Monday, five companies came away victorious, including a few big winners. Here they are, as well as the six other companies who pitched. First place: Admetsys Prize includes: first round interview at Entrepreneurs Roundtable Accelerator; slots in two other accelerators; credits for services from Microsoft and Amazon; entrepreneur office hours —Admetsys has developed a glucose control system for diabetic patients. It is an automated system, which the company calls an artificial pancreas, and is designed to reduce the amount of time patients spend in hospitals, says CEO Jeff Valk. The Boston-based company has completed three FDA-approved clinical trials, though it is still waiting for pivotal data because it does not have its final device yet, Valk says. It expects that device to be ready in September. Second place: Astroprint Prize includes: first round interview at Entrepreneurs Roundtable Accelerator; credits for business services from Microsoft and Amazon; entrepreneur office hours —Astroprint allows 3-D printer users to store their files in the cloud and send them to their printers via a simple interface on a phone, tablet, or computer—with no complicated software to install. The company expects the majority of its business to target the consumer market, though it has been approached by multiple 3-D printer lines, and would “follow the money” if the consumer market is slower that expected, CEO Drew Taylor says. Third place: Plum Prize includes: first round interview at Entrepreneurs Roundtable Accelerator; credits for business services from Microsoft and Amazon; entrepreneur office hours —Plum makes a software-enabled light switch—call it a smartswitch, if you will—that works like a touch screen on a smartphone. Swipe up with a single finger to turn a light on, use two fingers to control all lights in the room, and pinch to turn off all the lights in the house, says CEO Utz Baldwin. Austin, TX-based Plum has a free app that lets you also control the device remotely. The system costs $99 ($89 currently for preorders), Baldwin says. Audience award and Prezi award: Procyrion Prize includes: first round interview at Entrepreneurs Roundtable Accelerator; lifetime access to Foundersuite; a wearable tech band that reads a person’s muscles to control the device —Procyrion is a Houston medtech startup that develops a circulatory support pump that is thinner than a pencil and can be … Next Page »

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