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Barba D.,Biomedical University of Rome | Prisciandaro M.,University of LAquila | Salladini A.,Processi Innovativi | Mazziotti Di Celso G.,University of Teramo
Fuel | Year: 2011

Starting from an equilibrium model for gasification, this research group has devised a new mathematical model, the so called Gibbs Free Energy Gradient Method Model (GMM). This model permits to bypass the semi-qualitative view, typical of equilibrium models, which assume very restrictive hypotheses such as equilibrium state for all the reactions involved in gasification process, complete conversion of carbon matter, gasification products in gas phase only. GMM model overcomes these limitations providing a quantitative point of view, even though the hypothesis of no tar production affects both models. GMM model has been applied to RDF gasification, supplying reliable results in the gasification process analysis. Model computations in terms of gas yield, gas composition, low heating value and H2 yield, have been compared with literature results, showing that computed data are in good agreement with experimental ones. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd All rights reserved. Source


Iaquaniello G.,E. Palo KT Kinetics Technology SpA | Salladini A.,Processi Innovativi | Palo E.,E. Palo KT Kinetics Technology SpA | Centi G.,Messina University
ChemSusChem | Year: 2015

Catalytic partial oxidation coupled with membrane purification is a new process scheme to improve resource and energy efficiency in a well-established and large scale-process like syngas production. Experimentation in a semi industrial-scale unit (20 Nm3 h-1 production) shows that a novel syngas production scheme based on a pre-reforming stage followed by a membrane for hydrogen separation, a catalytic partial oxidation step, and a further step of syngas purification by membrane allows the oxygen-to-carbon ratio to be decreased while maintaining levels of feed conversion. For a total feed conversion of 40%, for example, the integrated novel architecture reduces oxygen consumption by over 50%, with thus a corresponding improvement in resource efficiency and an improved energy efficiency and economics, these factors largely depending on the air separation stage used to produce pure oxygen. © 2015 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim. Source


De Falco M.,Biomedical University of Rome | Iaquaniello G.,Tecnimont KT S.p.A | Salladini A.,Processi Innovativi
Journal of Membrane Science | Year: 2011

A reformer and membrane modules (RMM) test plant with a hydrogen capacity of 20Nm3/h has been designed and built to investigate the performance of said innovative architecture at an industrial level. A major benefit of the proposed RMM configuration is the shift in the chemical equilibrium of the steam reforming reactions by removing the hydrogen produced at high temperatures, thanks to the integration of highly selective Pd-based membranes. In this way, the process can operate at a lower thermal level (below 650°C in comparison to the 850-950°C temperature needed in traditional plants).Four types of Pd-based membranes, three already installed and one yet to be assembled, with an active area in the range 0.12-0.4m2, are tested in order to compare performance in terms of permeated hydrogen flux. Moreover, a noble metal catalyst supported on a SiC foam catalyst is placed inside the reactor in order to improve thermal transport inside the reforming tubes.Firstly, this paper introduces the plant design criteria: the process scheme, the construction engineering of reformers and membrane units and the control system implemented to maximize experimental outputs. The main experimental tests results are then reported and discussed, at least in a preliminary manner. About 1000 operating hours and more than 70 heating and cooling cycles were performed. The average H2 permeability for membranes tested are calculated and compared, and permeability expressions are reported. An overall feed conversion of 57.3% was achieved at 600°C, about 26% higher than what can be achieved in a conventional reformer at the same temperature, thanks to the integration of selective membranes. The 20Nm3/h RMM installation makes it possible to completely understand the potential of selective membrane application in industrial high-temperature chemical processes, and represents a unique installation worldwide. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. Source


Iaquaniello G.,KT Kinetics Technology S.p.A. | Salladini A.,Processi Innovativi | Palo E.,KT Kinetics Technology S.p.A. | Centi G.,Messina University
ChemSusChem | Year: 2015

Catalytic partial oxidation coupled with membrane purification is a new process scheme to improve resource and energy efficiency in a well-established and large scale-process like syngas production. Experimentation in a semi industrial-scale unit (20Nm3h-1 production) shows that a novel syngas production scheme based on a pre-reforming stage followed by a membrane for hydrogen separation, a catalytic partial oxidation step, and a further step of syngas purification by membrane allows the oxygen-to-carbon ratio to be decreased while maintaining levels of feed conversion. For a total feed conversion of 40%, for example, the integrated novel architecture reduces oxygen consumption by over 50%, with thus a corresponding improvement in resource efficiency and an improved energy efficiency and economics, these factors largely depending on the air separation stage used to produce pure oxygen. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim. Source

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