Probal Housing Ltd.

Mohammadpur, Bangladesh

Probal Housing Ltd.

Mohammadpur, Bangladesh
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Wada T.,Hokkaido University | Jesmin S.,Hokkaido University | Jesmin S.,National Health Research Institute | Jesmin S.,Probal Housing Ltd. | And 6 more authors.
Critical Care | Year: 2012

Introduction: Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is characterized by the concomitant activation of coagulofibrinolytic disorders and systemic inflammation associated with endothelial dysfunction-induced microvascular permeability. Angiogenic factors, including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), angiopoietin (Ang), and their receptors, play crucial roles in angiogenesis and microvascular permeability. The aim of the study was to assess the relationship between angiogenic factors, their soluble receptors and organ dysfunction associated with DIC after severe trauma.Materials and methods: A total of 57 patients with severe trauma were divided into two subgroups; 30 DIC patients and 27 non-DIC patients. The DIC was diagnosed based on the Japanese Association for Acute Medicine (JAAM) DIC and the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis (ISTH) overt DIC criteria. The serum levels of angiogenic factors were measured at the time of admission (Day 1), Day 3 and Day 5. This study compared levels of these angiogenic factors between the two DIC groups, and evaluated their predictive value for organ dysfunction.Results: DIC patients, especially those with ISTH DIC, showed higher Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) scores and lactate levels. There were lower levels of VEGF, Ang1 and the soluble Tie2 in the ISTH DIC patients than the non-DIC patients. The levels of soluble VEGF receptor-1 (sVEGFR1), Ang2 and the Ang2/Ang1 ratio in the ISTH DIC patients were higher than in non-DIC patients. The relationship between the presence of massive transfusion and angiogenic factors indicated the same results. The levels of sVEGFR1, Ang2 and the Ang2/Ang1 ratio correlated with the SOFA scores. In particular, sVEGFR1 and Ang2 were independent predictors of an increase in the SOFA score. The lactate levels independently predicted increases in the levels of sVEGFR1 and Ang2. The decrease in the platelet counts also independently predicted the increase in Ang2 levels in DIC patients.Conclusions: Angiogenic factors and their soluble receptors, particularly sVEGFR1 and Ang2, are considered to play pivotal roles in the development of organ dysfunction in DIC associated with severe trauma. DIC-induced tissue hypoxia and platelet consumption may play crucial roles in inducing sVEGFR1 and Ang2, and in determining the prognosis of the severity of organ dysfunction. © 2012 Wada et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


Akter S.,Probal Housing Ltd. | Akter S.,National Center for Global Health and Medicine | Jesmin S.,Probal Housing Ltd. | Jesmin S.,University of Tsukuba | And 7 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2013

Background:Parity increases the risk for coronary heart disease; however, its association with metabolic syndrome among women in low-income countries is still unknown.Objective:This study investigates the association between parity or gravidity and metabolic syndrome in rural Bangladeshi women.Methods:A cross-sectional study was conducted in 1,219 women aged 15-75 years from rural Bangladesh. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to the standard NCEP-ATP III criteria. Logistic regression was used to estimate the association between parity and gravidity and metabolic syndrome, with adjustment of potential confounding variables.Results:Subjects with the highest gravidity (> = 4) had 1.66 times higher odds of having metabolic syndrome compared to those in the lowest gravidity (0-1) (Ptrend = 0.02). A similar association was found between parity and metabolic syndrome (Ptrend = 0.04), i.e., subjects in the highest parity (> = 4) had 1.65 times higher odds of having metabolic syndrome compared to those in the lowest parity (0-1). This positive association of parity and gravidity with metabolic syndrome was confined to pre-menopausal women (Ptrend <0.01). Among the components of metabolic syndrome only high blood pressure showed positive association with parity and gravidity (Ptrend = 0.01 and <0.001). Neither Parity nor gravidity was appreciably associated with other components of metabolic syndrome.Conclusions:Multi parity or gravidity may be a risk factor for metabolic syndrome. © 2013 Akter et al.


Wada T.,Hokkaido University | Jesmin S.,Hokkaido University | Jesmin S.,University of Tsukuba | Jesmin S.,Probal Housing Ltd. | And 6 more authors.
Journal of Inflammation (United Kingdom) | Year: 2013

Background: Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are characterized by a disruption of the endothelium and alveolar epithelial barriers involving increased microvascular permeability, thus resulting in the set of protein-rich pulmonary edema. Angiogenic factors and their receptors, including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)/VEGF-receptor (VEGFR) and the angiopoietin (Ang)/Tie2 signaling pathways, play pivotal roles in both angiogenesis and microvascular permeability. The aim of the study was to assess the relationship between angiogenic factors, their soluble receptors and ALI/ARDS associated with critically ill patients, including sepsis, severe trauma, and post-cardiac arrest syndrome (PCAS). Methods. One hundred fifty-nine critically ill patients, including 50 patients with sepsis, 57 patients with severe trauma and 52 resuscitated after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, were divided into three subgroups: including 25 ALI patients, 101 ARDS patients and 22 non-ALI/ARDS patients. The serum levels of angiogenic factors were measured at the time of admission (day 1), as well as day 3 and day 5 and then were compared among the ALI, ARDS and non-ALI/ARDS groups. Their predictive values for developing ALI/ARDS and 28-day mortality were evaluated. Results: Higher levels of sVEGFR1 and Ang2 were observed in the ALI and ARDS patients than in the non-ALI/ARDS patients during the entire study period. The Ang2/Ang1 ratio in the ARDS group was also significantly higher than that in the non-ALI/ADRS group. The sVEGFR2 levels in the ARDS group on day 1 were significantly lower than those of the non-ALI/ADRS group. In addition, significant positive correlations were seen between the sVEGFR1, Ang2, Ang2/Ang1, and the development of ALI/ARDS in critical illness. There were also significant negative correlations between the minimal value of sVEGFR2, the maximal value of Ang1 and the ALI/ARDS group. In particular, sVEGFR2 and Ang2 were independent predictors of developing ALI/ARDS. Moreover, Ang2 and sVEGFR2 also independently predicted the mortality in ALI/ARDS patients. Conclusions: Angiogenic factors and their soluble receptors, particularly sVEGFR2 and Ang2, are thus considered to be valuable predictive biomarkers in the development of ALI/ARDS associated with critical illness and mortality in ALI/ARDS patients. © 2013 Wada et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


Wada T.,Hokkaido University | Jesmin S.,Hokkaido University | Jesmin S.,University of Tsukuba | Jesmin S.,Probal Housing Ltd. | And 6 more authors.
Critical Care | Year: 2012

Introduction: Post-cardiac arrest syndrome (PCAS) often leads to multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) with a poor prognosis. Endothelial and leukocyte activation after whole-body ischemia/reperfusion following resuscitation from cardiac arrest is a critical step in endothelial injury and related organ damage. Angiogenic factors, including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and angiopoietin (Ang), and their receptors play crucial roles in endothelial growth, survival signals, pathological angiogenesis and microvascular permeability. The aim of this study was to confirm the efficacy of angiogenic factors and their soluble receptors in predicting organ dysfunction and mortality in patients with PCAS.Methods: A total of 52 resuscitated patients were divided into two subgroups: 23 survivors and 29 non-survivors. The serum levels of VEGF, soluble VEGF receptor (sVEGFR)1, sVEGFR2, Ang1, Ang2 and soluble Tie2 (sTie2) were measured at the time of admission (Day 1) and on Day 3 and Day 5. The ratio of Ang2 to Ang1 (Ang2/Ang1) was also calculated. This study compared the levels of angiogenic factors and their soluble receptors between survivors and non-survivors, and evaluated the predictive value of these factors for organ dysfunction and 28-day mortality.Results: The non-survivors demonstrated more severe degrees of organ dysfunction and a higher prevalence of MODS. Non-survivors showed significant increases in the Ang2 levels and the Ang2/Ang1 ratios compared to survivors. A stepwise logistic regression analysis demonstrated that the Ang2 levels or the Ang2/Ang1 ratios on Day 1 independently predicted the 28-day mortality. The receiver operating characteristic curves of the Ang2 levels, and the Ang2/Ang1 ratios on Day 1 were good predictors of 28-day mortality. The Ang2 levels also independently predicted increases in the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) scores.Conclusions: We observed a marked imbalance between Ang1 and Ang2 in favor of Ang2 in PCAS patients, and the effect was more prominent in non-survivors. Angiogenic factors and their soluble receptors, particularly Ang2 and Ang2/Ang1, are considered to be valuable predictive biomarkers in the development of organ dysfunction and poor outcomes in PCAS patients. © 2012 Wada et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


Akter S.,Probal Housing Ltd. | Akter S.,National Center for Global Health and Medicine | Jesmin S.,Probal Housing Ltd. | Jesmin S.,University of Tsukuba | And 8 more authors.
Nutrition and Metabolism | Year: 2012

Background: Early age at menarche is associated with increased risk of metabolic syndrome in both China and the West. However, little is known about the impact of age at menarche and metabolic syndrome in South Asian women, including those from low-income country, where age at menarche is also falling. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether age at menarche is inversely associated with metabolic syndrome in Bangladeshi women, who are mostly poor and have limited access to and or poor health care facilities. Methods. This community-based cross-sectional study was performed using 1423 women aged between 15-75 years from rural Bangladesh in 2009 and 2010. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to standard NCEP-ATP III criteria. Logistic regression was used to estimate the association between age at menarche and metabolic syndrome, with adjustment of potential confounding variables, including age, education, marital status, tobacco users, use of contraceptives and number of pregnancies. Results: Early onset of menarche (<12 years) as compared to late onset (>13 years) was found to be associated with a higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome (odds ratio=1.55; 95 % confidence interval =1.05-2.30). Age at onset of menarche was also inversely associated with prevalence of high triglycerides (P for trend <0.01) and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (P for trend = 0.01), but positively associated with prevalence of high fasting blood glucose (P for trend =0.02). However, no significant association was found between age at menarche, high blood pressure and elevated waist circumference. Conclusion: Early onset of menarche might promote or trigger development of metabolic syndrome. Thus, knowledge of the history of age at onset of menarche may be critical in identifying women at risk of developing metabolic syndrome and those likely to benefit the most from early interventions. © 2012 Akter et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


Jesmin S.,Probal Housing Ltd. | Jesmin S.,National Center for Global Health and Medicine | Islam A.S.,Probal Housing Ltd. | Islam A.S.,National Center for Global Health and Medicine | And 14 more authors.
BMC Research Notes | Year: 2013

Background: Prevalence of non-communicable diseases are a challenging problems among menopausal women specially in a least developed country like Bangladesh, where majority of women suffering from at least one chronic diseases after menopausal age. So, the main objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and related risk factors in Bangladeshi pre- and post-menopausal women living in the rural setting. Methods. This study is based on a community based cross-sectional survey among 1802 rural women aged ≥15 years. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to the criteria of NCEP-ATP III. Logistic regression was used to estimate the association between menopausal status and metabolic syndrome and its components. Results: Metabolic syndrome was presented in 25.6% respondents and it was more prevalent among post-menopausal (39.3%) as compared to pre-menopausal (16.8%) women. Logistic regression analysis reveals that prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 1.78 times higher in post-menopausal women than pre-menopausal women (P = 0.001). Prevalence of high blood pressure, elevated fasting blood glucose, and high triglyceride were significantly higher in post-menopausal women than pre-menopausal women (P < 0.05). However, prevalence of low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol was significantly lower in post-menopausal women than pre-menopausal women (P < 0.001). Conclusions: Metabolic syndrome seems to be a major health problem among post-menopausal women in many developing countries like Bangladesh and proper policy emphasis should be given on its prevention and control. © 2013 Jesmin et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


PubMed | Probal Housing Ltd
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Nutrition & metabolism | Year: 2013

Early age at menarche is associated with increased risk of metabolic syndrome in both China and the West. However, little is known about the impact of age at menarche and metabolic syndrome in South Asian women, including those from low-income country, where age at menarche is also falling. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether age at menarche is inversely associated with metabolic syndrome in Bangladeshi women, who are mostly poor and have limited access to and or poor health care facilities.This community-based cross-sectional study was performed using 1423 women aged between 15-75 years from rural Bangladesh in 2009 and 2010. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to standard NCEP-ATP III criteria. Logistic regression was used to estimate the association between age at menarche and metabolic syndrome, with adjustment of potential confounding variables, including age, education, marital status, tobacco users, use of contraceptives and number of pregnancies.Early onset of menarche (<12 years) as compared to late onset (>13 years) was found to be associated with a higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome (odds ratio=1.55; 95 % confidence interval =1.05-2.30). Age at onset of menarche was also inversely associated with prevalence of high triglycerides (P for trend <0.01) and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (P for trend = 0.01), but positively associated with prevalence of high fasting blood glucose (P for trend =0.02). However, no significant association was found between age at menarche, high blood pressure and elevated waist circumference.Early onset of menarche might promote or trigger development of metabolic syndrome. Thus, knowledge of the history of age at onset of menarche may be critical in identifying women at risk of developing metabolic syndrome and those likely to benefit the most from early interventions.


PubMed | Probal Housing Ltd.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: PloS one | Year: 2013

Parity increases the risk for coronary heart disease; however, its association with metabolic syndrome among women in low-income countries is still unknown.This study investigates the association between parity or gravidity and metabolic syndrome in rural Bangladeshi women.A cross-sectional study was conducted in 1,219 women aged 15-75 years from rural Bangladesh. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to the standard NCEP-ATP III criteria. Logistic regression was used to estimate the association between parity and gravidity and metabolic syndrome, with adjustment of potential confounding variables.Subjects with the highest gravidity (> = 4) had 1.66 times higher odds of having metabolic syndrome compared to those in the lowest gravidity (0-1) (P trend = 0.02). A similar association was found between parity and metabolic syndrome (P(trend) = 0.04), i.e., subjects in the highest parity (> = 4) had 1.65 times higher odds of having metabolic syndrome compared to those in the lowest parity (0-1). This positive association of parity and gravidity with metabolic syndrome was confined to pre-menopausal women (P(trend) <0.01). Among the components of metabolic syndrome only high blood pressure showed positive association with parity and gravidity (P(trend) = 0.01 and <0.001). Neither Parity nor gravidity was appreciably associated with other components of metabolic syndrome.Multi parity or gravidity may be a risk factor for metabolic syndrome.

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