Private Paediatric Dental Clinic

Athens, Greece

Private Paediatric Dental Clinic

Athens, Greece

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Sakkas C.,Private Paediatric Dental Clinic | Khomenko L.,Bogomolets National Medical University | Trachuk I.,Bogomolets National Medical University
European Archives of Paediatric Dentistry | Year: 2013

Aim: This prospective clinical study evaluated the sealant retention rate and caries-preventive efficacy of two fissure sealing techniques over a 3-year period. Methods: Subjects (87) aged between 6. 5 and 11. 5 years were enrolled into two groups. In Group I (41 subjects), a resin-based fissure sealant (Fissurit FX, VOCO, Germany) was placed on all four sound permanent first molars (FPM-164 teeth) of each subject and in Group II (46 subjects) on 4 caries-free premolars (P1-2 182 teeth),using the following adhesives systems: Optibond FL (Kerr, USA), Optibond Solo plus (Kerr, USA), Prompt-L-Pop (3 M ESPE, USA) or the conventional acid-etch technique. Sealed teeth were evaluated at baseline, 6, 12, 18, 24 and 36-month intervals with regard to retention and new caries development. Sealant retention was scored as: (1) complete retention; (2) partial loss; (3) complete loss of sealant. Statistics: Wilcoxon-signed rank test was used to analyse the data. Results: The complete retention rate was: Optibond FL/sealant 80. 01-82. 92 %, Optibond Solo plus/sealant 73. 78-74. 27 %, Prompt-L-Pop/sealant 42. 84-53. 65 % versus acid-etch technique 62. 86-71. 44 % on FPM and P1-2 (p < 0. 05). The fissure caries incidence rate was: Optibond FL/sealant 2. 43-2. 85 %, Optibond Solo plus/sealant 2. 85-4. 76 %, Prompt-L-Pop/sealant 24. 40-34. 28 % versus acid-etch technique 16. 66-17. 14 % (p < 0. 05) on FPM and P1-2. A statistically significant difference in sealant retention rate was observed between FPM and P1-2, using the self-etching adhesive system Prompt-L-Pop and acid-etch technique. Conclusion: It may be concluded that the use of adhesive systems Optibond FL and Optibond Solo plus yielded better fissure sealing performance. © 2013 European Academy of Paediatric Dentistry.


Lygidakis N.N.,Private Paediatric Dental Clinic | Chatzidimitriou K.,Private Paediatric Dental Clinic | Theologie-Lygidakis N.,Private Paediatric Dental Clinic | Lygidakis N.A.,Private Paediatric Dental Clinic
European Archives of Paediatric Dentistry | Year: 2015

Aim: To evaluate the clinical outcome of a treatment protocol performed in children with unerupted permanent maxillary central incisors, including surgical removal of any related obstruction and traction initiation in one stage, under fully repositioned flap, combined with pre- and post-operative orthodontics for space creation and final alignment. Methods: Forty-six patients aged 7.3–12.7 years (mean = 9.44 ± 1.36) having 54 impacted maxillary central incisors were reviewed. The study group included 37 patients fully treated by us and nine referrals with eruption failure of impacted incisors following previous surgical removal of various obstructions. Detailed patient’s clinical and radiographic data were recorded. Results: Aetiology of unerupted incisors included 9 patients with odontomas, 24 with supernumerary teeth, 1 with skeletal lack of space, 1 with a dentigerous cyst, 4 with dilaceration, 1 with severe incisor MIH, 5 with luxation injuries to primary predecessors and 1 with coexisting dilaceration and odontoma. The total treatment time following the standardised protocol ranged from 5 to 21 months (mean 9.88 ± 3.10), while the time needed using different approaches (no pre-operative orthodontics or obstruction removal and then to wait over an assessment period) ranged from 12 to 18 months (mean 15 ± 2.12) and 17 to 30 months (mean 23.73 ± 5.14), respectively (p < 0.05). The time needed for full alignment depended on the inclination, the height of the impacted tooth (p = 0.001) and the patient’s age (p = 0.002). Additionally, the absence of pre-operative orthodontics for space creation dramatically increased treatment time (p = 0.018). In contrast, the maturity of the impacted tooth and the developmental stage of the anterior teeth did not affect treatment time. Finally, when the location of the impacted tooth and the space availability allowed waiting for spontaneous eruption, treatment time was not statistically different from that of the main treatment protocol (p = 0.545). Conclusions: The studied treatment protocol appears ideal for successful results and minimum treatment time. Space creation followed by surgical removal of any obstruction together with orthodontic traction initiation produces excellent results, while waiting for spontaneous eruption is indicated only in cases of favourable patient’s age and tooth location. Treatment initiation with operation in the absence of the required eruption space is not recommended, whereas in unfavourable cases obstruction removal without simultaneous orthodontic traction increases dramatically the total treatment time and requires an unnecessary second operation for traction. © 2014, European Academy of Paediatric Dentistry.


Lygidakis N.A.,Private Paediatric Dental Clinic | Chatzidimitriou K.,Private Paediatric Dental Clinic | Lygidakis N.N.,Private Paediatric Dental Clinic
European Archives of Paediatric Dentistry | Year: 2015

Background: In cases of infraoccluded primary molars associated with agenesis of premolars, any treatment plan occasionally includes retention of the primary teeth for space preservation and future implant placement if needed. In these cases, building up the crowns to the occlusal line is necessary to prevent various clinical problems. The present case report describes in detail a novel but simple clinical approach for retention and building up of the crown of infraoccluded primary molars. Case report/technique presentation: The technique is presented in a 14-year-old girl with nine missing permanent teeth. Orthodontic evaluation indicated space closure for five teeth and space maintenance in the remaining four second primary molars, three of them being infraoccluded. The technique included the following clinical steps: (a) elastic separators were placed proximally to the primary molars for few days to create space; (b) proximal minimal reduction of the crown width was performed; a direct hand composite resin core was made to increase crown height facilitating the selection of a preformed metal crown (PMC). The selected PMC was filled with self-curing composite resin and placed on the primary tooth following an acid etch and adhesive procedure; excess cervical material was removed; (c) after polymerisation, the PMC was carefully removed using cutting and hand instruments, revealing the composite resin fabricated crown which was adjusted for occlusion and polished. Radiographic evaluation confirmed the result. Conclusion: This simple method for infraoccluded primary molars crown building up to occlusion using conventional instruments and materials, appears to be a valuable clinical tool for paediatric dentists who frequently find themselves dealing with primary teeth that need to be retained and which can produce serious clinical problems if left untreated. © 2015, European Academy of Paediatric Dentistry.


PubMed | Private Paediatric Dental Clinic
Type: Journal Article | Journal: European archives of paediatric dentistry : official journal of the European Academy of Paediatric Dentistry | Year: 2015

To evaluate the clinical outcome of a treatment protocol performed in children with unerupted permanent maxillary central incisors, including surgical removal of any related obstruction and traction initiation in one stage, under fully repositioned flap, combined with pre- and post-operative orthodontics for space creation and final alignment.Forty-six patients aged 7.3-12.7 years (mean = 9.44 1.36) having 54 impacted maxillary central incisors were reviewed. The study group included 37 patients fully treated by us and nine referrals with eruption failure of impacted incisors following previous surgical removal of various obstructions. Detailed patients clinical and radiographic data were recorded.Aetiology of unerupted incisors included 9 patients with odontomas, 24 with supernumerary teeth, 1 with skeletal lack of space, 1 with a dentigerous cyst, 4 with dilaceration, 1 with severe incisor MIH, 5 with luxation injuries to primary predecessors and 1 with coexisting dilaceration and odontoma. The total treatment time following the standardised protocol ranged from 5 to 21 months (mean 9.88 3.10), while the time needed using different approaches (no pre-operative orthodontics or obstruction removal and then to wait over an assessment period) ranged from 12 to 18 months (mean 15 2.12) and 17 to 30 months (mean 23.73 5.14), respectively (p < 0.05). The time needed for full alignment depended on the inclination, the height of the impacted tooth (p = 0.001) and the patients age (p = 0.002). Additionally, the absence of pre-operative orthodontics for space creation dramatically increased treatment time (p = 0.018). In contrast, the maturity of the impacted tooth and the developmental stage of the anterior teeth did not affect treatment time. Finally, when the location of the impacted tooth and the space availability allowed waiting for spontaneous eruption, treatment time was not statistically different from that of the main treatment protocol (p = 0.545).The studied treatment protocol appears ideal for successful results and minimum treatment time. Space creation followed by surgical removal of any obstruction together with orthodontic traction initiation produces excellent results, while waiting for spontaneous eruption is indicated only in cases of favourable patients age and tooth location. Treatment initiation with operation in the absence of the required eruption space is not recommended, whereas in unfavourable cases obstruction removal without simultaneous orthodontic traction increases dramatically the total treatment time and requires an unnecessary second operation for traction.

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