Princeton, NJ, United States

Princeton University

www.princeton.edu/
Princeton, NJ, United States

Princeton University is a private Ivy League research university in Princeton, New Jersey. Founded in 1746 in Elizabeth as the College of New Jersey, Princeton was the fourth chartered institution of higher education in the American colonies and thus one of the nine Colonial Colleges established before the American Revolution. The institution moved to Newark in 1747, then to the current site nine years later, where it was renamed Princeton University in 1896. The present-day College of New Jersey in nearby Ewing Township, New Jersey, is an unrelated institution. Princeton had close ties to the Presbyterian Church, but has never been affiliated with any denomination and today imposes no religious requirements on its students.Princeton provides undergraduate and graduate instruction in the humanities, social science, natural science, and engineering. It offers professional degrees through the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, the School of Engineering and Applied Science, the School of Architecture and the Bendheim Center for Finance. The University has tied with the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton Theological Seminary, and the Westminster Choir College of Rider University. By endowment per student, Princeton is the wealthiest school in the United States.Princeton has been associated with 37 Nobel laureates, 17 National Medal of Science winners, two Abel Prize winners, eight Fields Medalists , nine Turing Award laureates, three National Humanities Medal recipients and 204 Rhodes Scholars. Wikipedia.


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Patent
Princeton University | Date: 2017-02-08

Methods described herein enable the production of numerous molecular species through decarboxylative cross-coupling via use of photoredox and transition metal catalysts. For example, methods described herein enable the production of numerous molecular species through decarboxylative cross-coupling via use of photoredox and transition metal catalysts. A method described herein, in some embodiments, comprises providing a reaction mixture including a photoredox catalyst, a transition metal catalyst, a coupling partner and a substrate having a carboxyl group. The reaction mixture is irradiated with a radiation source resulting in cross-coupling of the substrate and coupling partner via a mechanism including decarboxylation, wherein the coupling partner is selected from the group consisting of a substituted aromatic compound and a substituted aliphatic compound.


Patent
Princeton University | Date: 2017-06-07

Methods of isotopic labeling are described herein. For example, a method of isotopically labeling an organic compound, in some embodiments, comprises providing a reaction mixture including the organic compound, an iron complex or a cobalt complex and a source of deuterium or tritium. The organic compound is labeled with deuterium or tritium in the presence of the iron complex or cobalt complex or derivative of the iron complex or cobalt complex.


Patent
Gpb Scientific, Llc, Princeton University and University of Maryland, Baltimore | Date: 2017-06-07

Described herein are improved microfluidic devices and methods for processing cells that can improve cell quality, streamline workflows, and lower costs. Applications include research and clinical diagnostics in cancer, infectious disease, and inflammatory disease, among other disease areas.


Patent
Princeton University and Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation | Date: 2017-06-14

The present disclosure related in general to methods of treating cancer by interfering with the interaction of metadherin with Staphylococcal nuclease domain-containing 1 (SND1) using peptides or other compounds that inhibit the binding of SND1 with metadherin and inhibit the activity of the MTDH-SND1 complex in tumor cells.


Patent
University of Virginia and Princeton University | Date: 2017-02-14

Embodiments of the present disclosure provide for methods of hydrocarbon functionalization, methods and systems for converting a hydrocarbon into a compound including at least one group ((e.g., hydroxyl group) (e.g., methane to methanol)), functionalized hydrocarbons, and the like.


Passive components adapted for integration with at least one active semiconductor device, in an embodiment, comprise at least one metallic structure dimensioned and arranged to absorb and/or reflect a major fraction of incident electromagnetic radiation received at one or more wavelengths of a first group of wavelengths. This prevents radiation within the first group of wavelengths from being received and/or processed by the at least one active device. In an embodiment, one or more metallic structures are dimensioned and arranged to direct an amount of incident radiation, received at one or more wavelengths of a second group of wavelengths, sufficient to enable receiving or processing of incident radiation within the second group of wavelengths by the at least one active semiconductor device. In some embodiments, the passive component comprises a passive optical filter for use in spectroscopic applications, and the active semiconductor device is a detector or sensor.


A system and method for disintegrated channel estimation in wireless networks. The system provides a disintegrated channel estimation technique required to accomplish the spatial diversity supported by cooperative relays. The system includes a filter-and-forward (FF) relaying method with superimposed training sequences for separately estimating the backhaul and the access channels. To reduce inter-relay interference, a generalized filtering technique is provided which multiplexes the superimposed training sequences from different relays to the destination by time-division multiplexing (TDM), frequency-division multiplexing (FDM) and code-division multiplexing (CDM) methods.


Patent
Princeton University | Date: 2017-02-09

A method and system capable of implicitly authenticating users based on information gathered from one or more sensors, which may be located in one or more devices, and an authentication model trained via a machine learning technique. Data is collected, manipulated, and assessed with the authentication model in order to determine if the user is authentic. A wide variety of sensors may be utilized, including sensors in smartphones, smartwatches, other wearable devices, and other sensors accessible via an internet of things (IoT) system. The method and system can include continuously testing the users behavior patterns and environment characteristics, and allowing authentication without interrupting the users other interactions with a given device or requiring explicit user input. The method and system may also involve the authentication model being retrained, or adaptively updated to include temporal changes in the users patterns.


Patent
Princeton University, Purdue Research Foundation and Indian Statistical Institute | Date: 2017-02-06

A user authentication system for an electronic device for use with a plurality of wireless wearable medical sensors (WMSs) and a wireless base station that receives a biomedical data stream (biostream) from each WMS. The system includes a BioAura engine located on a server, the server has a wireless transmitter/receiver with receive buffers that store the plurality of biostreams, the biostream from a single WMS lacks the discriminatory power to identify the user, the BioAura engine has a look up stage and a classifier, the classifier generates an authentication output based on the plurality of biostreams, the authentication output authenticates the users access to the electronic device. The wireless base station has a transmitter/receiver having receive buffers that store the biomedical data from each WMS, the wireless base station has a communication engine that retrieves the biostream from each WMS and transmits the plurality of biostreams to the server.


Burrows A.,Princeton University
Reviews of Modern Physics | Year: 2013

Core-collapse theory brings together many facets of high-energy and nuclear astrophysics and the numerical arts to present theorists with one of the most important, yet frustrating, astronomical questions: "What is the mechanism of core-collapse supernova explosions?" A review of all the physics and the 50-year history involved would soon bury the reader in minutiae that could easily obscure the essential elements of the phenomenon, as we understand it today. Moreover, much remains to be discovered and explained, and a complicated review of an unresolved subject in flux could grow stale fast. Therefore, this paper describes various important facts and perspectives that may have escaped the attention of those interested in this puzzle. Furthermore, an attempt to describe the modern theory's physical underpinnings and a brief summary of the current state of play are given. In the process, a few myths that have crept into modern discourse are identified. However, there is much more to do and humility in the face of this age-old challenge is clearly the most prudent stance as its eventual resolution is sought. © 2013 American Physical Society.

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