Plainsboro, NJ, United States

Princeton Satellite Systems

www.psatellite.com
Plainsboro, NJ, United States

Time filter

Source Type

Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 98.11K | Year: 2014

Princeton Satellite Systems proposes an ultra-precise attitude and orbit determination system to provide exceptional ground location accuracy for Earth imaging. Improving the location accuracy from 60 m to less than 10 m requires minimization of all sources of errors in the pointing knowledge, pointing accuracy, and orbit knowledge. The attitude determination system uses nonlinear attitude filters, optical gyros and star cameras with PSS-developed star centroiding algorithms. These algorithms will dramatically reduce centroiding errors and produce unprecedented attitude knowledge accuracy. The attitude filters can incorporate nontraditional measurements from various attitude-dependent sources onboard the spacecraft, such as the communication system, for improved robustness and accuracy. The optical gyros enable a high bandwidth control system which can acquire multiple targets in one pass. The GPS-based orbit determination is enhanced with two-way ranging from the communication system to reduce the navigation error. The pointing system uses PSS ultra-low-jitter reaction wheels for high pointing accuracy and to reduce image smear. The technology in this system, which was developed by and is unique to Princeton Satellite Systems, will provide ground location accuracy of better than 10 m in a nanosatellite-class package.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 573.89K | Year: 2015

Princeton Satellite Systems proposes an ultra-precise attitude and orbit determination system to provide exceptional ground location accuracy for Earth imaging. A systems approach is required to provide 10 m accuracy to warfighters in real-time. The attitude determination system uses nonlinear attitude filters, optical gyros and star cameras with PSS-developed star centroiding algorithms. These algorithms will dramatically reduce centroiding errors and produce unprecedented attitude knowledge accuracy. The attitude filters can incorporate nontraditional measurements from various attitude-dependent sources onboard the spacecraft, such as the communication system, for improved robustness and accuracy. Optical gyros enable a high bandwidth control system which can acquire multiple targets in one pass. GPS-based orbit determination is enhanced with two-way ranging from the communication system to reduce navigation error. The pointing system uses PSS ultra-low-jitter reaction wheels for high pointing accuracy and to reduce image smear. The technology in this system, which was developed by and is unique to Princeton Satellite Systems, will provide ground location accuracy of better than 10 m in a nanosatellite-class package. In Phase II a testbed including all ACS hardware will be built to verify the design and prepare for Phase III.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 741.15K | Year: 2011

ABSTRACT: We plan to develop an operation-ready version of the next-generation Direct Ascent Vulnerability web service with UDOP visualization. The DAV suite will include the dynamic predictive functionality and reachability service prototyped in Phase I and a new vehicle trajectory prediction algorithm to be prototyped in Phase II. The DAV tools take available data on the orbital catalog and missile models and utilize orbital dynamics to determine vulnerability windows of satellites to either a direct ascent launch or a satellite from another orbit. Reachability provides a running forecast of possible threats considering a database of missile models and sites and the dynamic predictive function provides real-time analysis for discrimination between a benign launch and an attack. The service provides live and exercise modes and can be used for what-if analysis or launch planning. The operational web service must be compatible with the JSpOC Mission System (JMS) architecture and accept various real message types including ILAM, T-3, and IBS messages, and handle special perturbations satellite elements. We will deploy the new service suite on AFRL's Battlespace Evaluation Assessment Space Testbed, or BEAST, and perform testing on real-time and prepackaged data sets as available to determine the accuracy of the satellite vulnerability predictions. BENEFIT: This technology will predict which satellites are vulnerable to a direct ascent launch in real-time, in addition to providing what-if and predictive analysis. The JSpOC Mission System needs services like this to assist in space situational awareness. The recent use of direct ascent launch against satellites by both the U.S. and China indicate that this is a real threat. This suite of services was designed for predicting satellite vulnerability from the beginning and will outperform terrestrial applications designed for surface-to-surface missiles. There is a potential commercial application of a portion of the toolset for launch planning and collision avoidance, in both MATLAB and standalone application formats.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 1.49M | Year: 2010

The objective of this Navy SBIR project is to develop an innovative methodology and supporting software toolset that permits a requirements-driven reconfiguration of one or multiple spacecraft. The product will be a decision-support tool termed SPEAR - Satellite Planner for Execution and Reconfiguration. SPEAR will 1) accept dynamically changing SSA data, mission requirements and priorities to support the warfighter''s needs, 2) compute a set of satellite configuration and tasking options using a backbone of optimization algorithms, simulations, and access to 3rd party tools, and 3) effectively presents these options to the operators and commanders through customizable displays. In order to promote an open-architecture design and to make efficient use of outside software tools, SPEAR shall be developed as a set of libraries and plugins on top of the VisualCommander application. VisualCommander is a product in use at Princeton Satellite Systems for spacecraft and missile analysis and simulation. This is a versatile tool designed for both engineering analysis and mission operations, providing sophisticated simulation, visualization and analysis of orbit and system dynamics. SPEAR will be sufficiently self-contained to provide value as an independent tool, but will also be capable of integration with other tools being developed to support Joint Space Operations.


Patent
Princeton Satellite Systems | Date: 2015-08-25

Disclosed a multi-sensor multiple hypotheses testing tracking system. The multi-hypothesis testing system associates measurements from multiple sensors with tracks. Measurements are incorporated using a Kalman Filter and the same filters are used to propagate the trajectories of the tracks.


Patent
Princeton Satellite Systems and Princeton University | Date: 2013-05-10

A system and method for producing and controlling high thrust and desirable specific impulse from a continuous fusion reaction is disclosed. The resultant relatively small rocket engine will have lower cost to develop, test, and operate that the prior art, allowing spacecraft missions throughout the planetary system and beyond. The rocket engine method and system includes a reactor chamber and a heating system produce fusion reactions the stable plasma. Magnets produce a magnetic field that confines the stable plasma. A fuel injection system and a propellant injection system are included. Cold propellant into a gas box for converting a cold propellant into a warm propellant plasma at one end of the reactor chamber. The propellant and fusion products are directed out of the reactor chamber through a magnetic nozzle and are detached from the magnetic field lines producing thrust.


The invention is for a sensor for use in spacecraft navigation and communication. The system has two articulated telescopes providing navigation information and orientation information as well providing communications capability. Each telescope contains a laser and compatible sensor for optical communications and ranging, and an imaging chip for imaging the star field and planets. The three optical functions share a common optical path. A frequency selective prism or mirror directs incoming laser light to the communications and ranging sensor. The Doppler shift or time-of-flight of laser light reflected from the target can be measured. The sensor can use the range and range rate measured from the incoming laser along with measurements from the imaging chip to determine the location and velocity of the spacecraft. The laser and laser receiver provide communications capability.


Patent
Princeton Satellite Systems | Date: 2012-10-03

The invention is for spacecraft reaction wheel with an axial flux dual Halbach rotor with an air coil stator. This wheel is more efficient and has fewer disturbances than a conventional reaction wheel with a brushless DC motor.


Patent
Princeton Satellite Systems | Date: 2012-08-29

A route finding system comprising a memory, GPS device, library of maps, an optimization algorithm and means for capturing user input and outputting data. The user input includes points, goals, constraints and relative preferences. Goals and constraints include characteristics of the route such as the type of road, number of turns, and traffic. The relative preferences are converted into numerical weights, positive or negative. In addition, the system integrates social networks ratings and comments to further enhance route selection.


Patent
Princeton Satellite Systems | Date: 2012-06-08

This invention is a solar-powered charging station for electric and hybrid vehicles. A vehicle parks at a space with the charging station and uses a credit card, debit card, cash, smart card or network connection to a database like EZ-Pass to pay for the space and the electricity. The station automatically charges the vehicle as long as it is connected to the station. The station automatically stops charging when the vehicle is fully charged. The customer only pays for the space and the electricity consumed. If the charging circuit is broken the customer must reinsert the smart card or credit card to restart charging. Sufficient funds are removed from the payment method on initiation of charging. Any money not used for charging is put back onto the smart card or account if the user reinserts it prior to leaving.

Loading Princeton Satellite Systems collaborators
Loading Princeton Satellite Systems collaborators