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Swanson V.,University of Stirling | Nicol H.,University of Stirling | McInnes R.,University of Stirling | Cheyne H.,University of Stirling | And 2 more authors.
Qualitative Health Research | Year: 2012

Developing maternal self-efficacy offsets negative psychological consequences of premature birth, improving maternal well-being. We investigated women's experiences in a neonatal unit (NNU) in Scotland in semistructured interviews with 19 primiparous mothers of preterm babies. We explored their experience of preterm birth and development of self-efficacy in infant feeding behaviors, identifying emergent and a priori themes. Women reported experiencing loss and biographical disruption in relation to mothering, loss of autonomy, and searching for normality after premature birth. Providing breast milk symbolized embodied contact with their baby and increased maternal confidence. They developed motivation, knowledge, and perseverance and perceived success from positive feedback, primarily from their baby and health professionals' support and encouragement. Women actively constructed opportunities to develop ownership, control, and confidence in relation to interactions with their baby. We linked sources of self-efficacy with potential behavior change techniques to be used in practice to improve maternal confidence in the NNU. © The Author(s) 2012.


Dubiel L.,Royal Infirmary | Dubiel L.,Ninewells Hospital | Scott G.A.,Royal Infirmary | Agaram R.,Royal Infirmary | And 3 more authors.
International Journal of Obstetric Anesthesia | Year: 2014

Pregnancy in women with achondroplasia presents major challenges for anaesthetists and obstetricians. We report the case of a woman with achondroplasia who underwent general anaesthesia for an elective caesarean section. She was 99 cm in height and her condition was further complicated by severe kyphoscoliosis and previous back surgery. She was reviewed in the first trimester at the anaesthetic high-risk clinic. A multidisciplinary team was convened to plan her peripartum care. Because of increasing dyspnoea caesarean section was performed at 32 weeks of gestation. She received a general anaesthetic using a modified rapid-sequence technique with remifentanil and rocuronium. The intraoperative period was complicated by desaturation and high airway pressures. The woman's postoperative care was complicated by respiratory compromise requiring high dependency care. © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.


PubMed | Princess Royal Maternity Hospital and Royal Infirmary
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Obstetric medicine | Year: 2016

Hypertensive disorders in pregnancy are common and can occur as a result of pre-existing hypertension or as new onset hypertension usually in the second half of pregnancy. In either situation there is potential for considerable perinatal and maternal morbidity and mortality. This review article aims to compare therapeutic options outlined in a selection of national guidelines and to look in more detail at the most commonly prescribed drugs - labetalol, methyldopa and nifedipine - with respect to their pharmacology and the evidence for their use in pregnancy. We will also consider the rationale for identifying and treating hypertension in pregnancy and the effect this can have on short- and long-term maternal and neonatal outcomes.


PubMed | Princess Royal Maternity Hospital and Royal Infirmary
Type: Case Reports | Journal: International journal of obstetric anesthesia | Year: 2014

Pregnancy in women with achondroplasia presents major challenges for anaesthetists and obstetricians. We report the case of a woman with achondroplasia who underwent general anaesthesia for an elective caesarean section. She was 99cm in height and her condition was further complicated by severe kyphoscoliosis and previous back surgery. She was reviewed in the first trimester at the anaesthetic high-risk clinic. A multidisciplinary team was convened to plan her peripartum care. Because of increasing dyspnoea caesarean section was performed at 32weeks of gestation. She received a general anaesthetic using a modified rapid-sequence technique with remifentanil and rocuronium. The intraoperative period was complicated by desaturation and high airway pressures. The womans postoperative care was complicated by respiratory compromise requiring high dependency care.


Forbes E.,Royal Hospital for Sick Children | Patel N.,Royal Hospital for Sick Children | Kasem K.,Princess Royal Maternity Hospital
Journal of Perinatology | Year: 2010

A term infant developed stridor, hoarse cry and respiratory distress after forceps-assisted delivery. Oral feeding resulted in aspiration. Flexible laryngoscopy showed a right-sided vocal cord paralysis (VCP). A magnetic resonance image (MRI) of the brain revealed an ovoid lesion in the posterior fossa impinging on the brainstem, which was considered to represent a subdural haematoma. Clinical signs of vocal cord palsy and the associated MRI changes resolved spontaneously by 6 weeks of age. Vocal cord palsy is a common cause of stridor in newborn infants, although in many cases it is considered idiopathic. This is the first report of vocal cord palsy associated with subdural haemorrhage after instrumental delivery, and may represent an important and previously unappreciated cause of VCP. This case highlights the importance of magnetic resonance brain imaging in those infants with VCP in whom the aetiology is uncertain. © 2010 Nature America.


Watts S.,University of Strathclyde | Mactier H.,Princess Royal Maternity Hospital | Grant J.,Princess Royal Maternity Hospital | Cameron Nicol E.,Princess Royal Maternity Hospital | Mullen A.B.,University of Strathclyde
European Journal of Pediatrics | Year: 2013

Adequate phosphate intake is important for the prevention of metabolic bone disease in preterm infants. The European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition recommends a daily phosphate intake of 184-230 mg/kg/day, which should be met by standard feed volumes of either commercially fortified breast milk or preterm formulae. We sought to investigate whether our local practise of providing supplemental oral phosphate for all infants born before 32 weeks' gestation continues to be necessary. Details of parenteral and milk feeding and both oral and parenteral phosphate supplementation from birth until 8 weeks of age were collected retrospectively from the case notes of 31 preterm infants. Routinely collected biochemical markers of bone mineral status were also recorded. Mean (SD) plasma phosphate concentration was higher when oral phosphate supplementation was given [2.10 (0.38) versus 1.92(0.50) mM/L without supplement (p < 0.001)]. A minimum average phosphate intake of 184 mg/kg/day was achieved by 47 and 77 % of babies in weeks 1 and 2, respectively, and by 84-100 % of infants from week 3. The percentage of plasma phosphate measurements below the minimum target of 1.8 mM/L was greater amongst unsupplemented babies (45 versus 18 %). Conclusion: A majority of infants <32 weeks' gestation did not achieve the recommended phosphate intake during the first week of life. Despite achieving the recommended phosphate intake from week 3, many infants did not have plasma phosphate concentrations within the accepted normal range. Additional oral supplementation may help to achieve blood phosphate concentrations within this target range. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.


Iliodromiti S.,Princess Royal Maternity Hospital | Murage A.,Princess Royal Maternity Hospital
Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology | Year: 2011

Heavy menstrual bleeding, or menorrhagia, is a primary cause of morbidity in women. Herein, we present the case of a 41-year-old woman who underwent day-surgery endometrial microwave ablation because of dysfunctional uterine bleeding. She had undergone previous laparoscopic sterilization, and had no other risk factors except for a retroverted uterus. The procedure was performed without any documented difficulties. The patient was readmitted the following day with clinical signs of acute abdomen. Emergency laparotomy revealed a large perforation on the anterior uterine wall, full-thickness burns in the distal ileum, and multiple ischemic areas in the ileum, cecum, and ascending colon secondary to microwave burns. A right hemicolectomy was required, with extended ileal resection and subtotal hysterectomy with ovarian conservation. Although microwave endometrial therapy seems to offer many advantages, in particular in terms of efficiency and technique, complications occur, and extensive safety measures must be implemented to prevent adverse effects such as occurred in this patient. © 2011 AAGL.


Uppal V.,Princess Royal Maternity Hospital | Kearns R.J.,Princess Royal Maternity Hospital | McGrady E.M.,Princess Royal Maternity Hospital
Anaesthesia | Year: 2011

The identification of the epidural space, insertion of an epidural catheter and lumbar puncture are advanced technical skills that can be challenging to teach to novice anaesthetists. The M43B Lumbar puncture simulator-II (Limbs & Things Ltd., Sussex Street, Bristol, UK) is a teaching aid designed for epidural and spinal insertion. The aim of this study was to determine if experienced anaesthetists thought this simulator may be a useful tool for training novice anaesthetists in these procedures. Experienced anaesthetists performed an epidural insertion followed by a lumbar puncture procedure on the simulator model. Various aspects of both epidural and lumbar puncture insertions were scored by the anaesthetists for likeness to a real patient using a Likert scale (0 - strongly disagree; 1 - disagree; 2 - neither agree nor disagree; 3 - agree; 4 - strongly agree). The simulator was found to be life-like for most aspects of epidural insertion. Median (IQR [range]) scores were: iliac crests 3.0 (3.0-3.2 [3-4]); spinous processes 3.0 (3.0-3.2 [2-4]); skin puncture 3.0 (3.0-3.0 [1-4]); subcutaneous tissues 3.0 (2.7-3.0 [1-4]); and loss of resistance 3.0 (3.0-4.0 [3-4]). The scores for supraspinous ligament 2.0 (1.0-3.0 [0-3]), interspinous ligament 2.5 (1.7-3.0 [0-3]) and ligamentum flavum 2.0 (1.0-3.0 [0-4]) were borderline for life-likeness. The volunteers found threading of the epidural catheter difficult and rated it unlike a real patient (score 1.0 (0.2-2.0 [0-3])). During lumbar puncture, dural puncture scored 3.0 (3.0-4.0 [2-4]) and intrathecal injection scored 2.5 (1.0-3.0 [1-4]). However, the overall impression was that the simulator could be a useful tool for training of both epidurals (score 3.0 (3.0-4.0 [3-4])) and spinals (score 3.0 (3.0-3.5 [2-4])). © 2011 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.


PubMed | Princess Royal Maternity Hospital
Type: Evaluation Studies | Journal: Anaesthesia | Year: 2011

The identification of the epidural space, insertion of an epidural catheter and lumbar puncture are advanced technical skills that can be challenging to teach to novice anaesthetists. The M43B Lumbar puncture simulator-II (Limbs & Things Ltd., Sussex Street, Bristol, UK) is a teaching aid designed for epidural and spinal insertion. The aim of this study was to determine if experienced anaesthetists thought this simulator may be a useful tool for training novice anaesthetists in these procedures. Experienced anaesthetists performed an epidural insertion followed by a lumbar puncture procedure on the simulator model. Various aspects of both epidural and lumbar puncture insertions were scored by the anaesthetists for likeness to a real patient using a Likert scale (0--strongly disagree; 1--disagree; 2--neither agree nor disagree; 3--agree; 4--strongly agree). The simulator was found to be life-like for most aspects of epidural insertion. Median (IQR [range]) scores were: iliac crests 3.0 (3.0-3.2 [3-4]); spinous processes 3.0 (3.0-3.2 [2-4]); skin puncture 3.0 (3.0-3.0 [1-4]); subcutaneous tissues 3.0 (2.7-3.0 [1-4]); and loss of resistance 3.0 (3.0-4.0 [3-4]). The scores for supraspinous ligament 2.0 (1.0-3.0 [0-3]), interspinous ligament 2.5 (1.7-3.0 [0-3]) and ligamentum flavum 2.0 (1.0-3.0 [0-4]) were borderline for life-likeness. The volunteers found threading of the epidural catheter difficult and rated it unlike a real patient (score 1.0 (0.2-2.0 [0-3])). During lumbar puncture, dural puncture scored 3.0 (3.0-4.0 [2-4]) and intrathecal injection scored 2.5 (1.0-3.0 [1-4]). However, the overall impression was that the simulator could be a useful tool for training of both epidurals (score 3.0 (3.0-4.0 [3-4])) and spinals (score 3.0 (3.0-3.5 [2-4])).


PubMed | Princess Royal Maternity Hospital
Type: Journal Article | Journal: International journal of gynecological cancer : official journal of the International Gynecological Cancer Society | Year: 2013

Presently, for those diagnosed with early cervical cancer who wish to conserve their fertility, there is the option of radical trachelectomy. Although successful, this procedure is associated with significant obstetric morbidity. The recurrence risk of early cervical cancer is low and in tumors measuring less than 2 cm; if the lymphatics are negative, the likelihood of parametrial involvement is less than 1%. Therefore, pelvic lymph nodes are a surrogate marker of parametrial involvement and radical excision of the parametrium can be omitted if they are negative.The aim of this study was to report our experience of the fertility conserving management of early cervical cancer with repeat large loop excision of the transformation zone and laparoscopic pelvic lymph node dissection.Between 2004 and 2011, a retrospective review of cases of early cervical cancer who had fertility conserving management within Glasgow Royal Infirmary was done.Forty-three patients underwent fertility conserving management of early cervical cancer. Forty were screen-detected cancers; 2 were stage IA1, 4 were stage IA2, and 37 were stage IB1. There were 2 central recurrences during the follow-up period. There have been 15 live children to 12 women and there are 4 ongoing pregnancies.To our knowledge, this is the largest case series described and confirms the low morbidity and mortality of this procedure. However, even within our highly select group, there have been 2 cases of central recurrent disease. We, therefore, are urging caution in the global adoption of this technique and would welcome a multicenter multinational randomized controlled trial.

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