Princess Margaret Cancer Center

Toronto, Canada

Princess Margaret Cancer Center

Toronto, Canada

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News Article | June 16, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

A "Game Changer" is someone in their field who is recognized as positively affecting the lives of millions of people and who makes a difference to the industries they are in, the communities where they live and the work they do. This year's Game Changers also have a Canadian tie and a desire to make a difference in Cancer Research. Net proceeds from the auction will support the important work taking place at Princess Margaret Cancer Centre. The Game Changers have donated their personal time and some amazing once-in-a-lifetime experiences including: This auction is LIVE for bidding and ends on July 14, 2017 at 10:00 P.M. You can visit the auction site and bid at: http://gamechangersauction.com Social media profiles can be found on Facebook at: https://www.facebook.com/PMGameChangers As one of the Top 5 Cancer Research Centres in the World, and with your help, The Princess Margaret can continue to be a true "Game Changer" in the fight against cancer and achieve our goal to Conquer Cancer In Our Lifetime! About Princess Margaret Cancer Centre  The Princess Margaret Cancer Centre has achieved an international reputation as a global leader in the fight against cancer and delivering Personalized Cancer Medicine. The Princess Margaret, one of the top 5 cancer research centres in the world, is a member of the University Health Network, which also includes Toronto General Hospital, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto Rehabilitation Institute and The Michener Institute for Education at UHN. All are research hospitals affiliated with the University of Toronto. www.theprincessmargaret.ca   About The Princess Margaret Cancer Foundation  The Princess Margaret Cancer Foundation at University Health Network is raising funds to lead the way in Personalized Cancer Medicine at the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, which includes The Campbell Family Cancer Research Institute and The Campbell Family Institute for Breast Cancer Research. www.thepmcf.ca


This year, the tournament saw a new addition with the launch of a new online fundraising auction, The Game Changers. Funds from this best-in-class event will also support The Princess Margaret, one of the top 5 cancer research centres in the world. "40% of Canadians will battle cancer in their lifetime. There will be a 40% increase of cases over the next 15 years in Canada. Transformational cancer care at The Princess Margaret is a reality because of your ongoing support" says Paul Alofs, President & CEO, Princess Margaret Cancer Foundation. The event, hosted at Coppinwood and Granite golf clubs in Stouffville, is presented by Harry Rosen Inc., with platinum sponsor Accompass and national gold sponsors -- Cadillac Fairview, Great-West Life, London Life & Canada Life and Greenpark Homes. The Rosen Cup, the coveted trophy of the event, was shared this year by champions at Coppinwood from Ellis Don and the champions at Granite Golf Club from TD Securities. All golfers took home a variety of gifts from Harry Rosen, TaylorMade  and Adidas Golf and others, while the contest hole prize winners also walked away with luxury luggage and many other prizes from Harry Rosen brand partners and suppliers. "As the head of a Canadian company that's been in business for over sixty-three years, we are so proud to support this world-class cancer research centre.  We consider it an honour and, in fact, our responsibility to help raise funds to conquer cancer by supporting Golf to Conquer Cancer as presenting sponsor," says Larry Rosen, Chairman and CEO of Harry Rosen Inc., volunteer Board  Member of The Princess Margaret Cancer Foundation, and Executive Committee Chair of the event. Join us on Monday, June 11th for the 2018 event for and help us Conquer Cancer in Our Lifetime. More details to follow. The tournament's online auction is still live at www.princessmargaretauctions.com and interested bidders can still support Princess Margaret through this exciting opportunity. About Princess Margaret Cancer Centre  The Princess Margaret Cancer Centre has achieved an international reputation as a global leader in the fight against cancer and delivering Personalized Cancer Medicine. The Princess Margaret, one of the top 5 cancer research centres in the world, is a member of the University Health Network, which also includes Toronto General Hospital, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto Rehabilitation Institute and The Michener Institute for Education at UHN. All are research hospitals affiliated with the University of Toronto. www.theprincessmargaret.ca   About The Princess Margaret Cancer Foundation  The Princess Margaret Cancer Foundation at University Health Network is raising funds to lead the way in Personalized Cancer Medicine at the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, which includes The Campbell Family Cancer Research Institute and The Campbell Family Institute for Breast Cancer Research. www.thepmcf.ca


News Article | June 28, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

(TORONTO, Canada - June 28, 2017) - Leukemia researchers led by Dr. John Dick have traced the origins of relapse in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) to rare therapy-resistant leukemia stem cells that are already present at diagnosis and before chemotherapy begins. They have also identified two distinct stem-cell like populations from which relapse can arise in different patients in this aggressive cancer that they previously showed starts in blood stem cells in the bone marrow. The findings - published today in Nature (doi:10.1038/nature22993) - provide significant insights into cell types fated to relapse and can help accelerate the quest for new, upfront therapies, says Dr. Dick, a Senior Scientist at Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, and Professor in the Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Toronto. He holds the Canada Research Chair in Stem Cell Biology and is Director of the Cancer Stem Cell Program at the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research. This study was primarily undertaken by post-doctoral fellow Dr. Liran Shlush and Scientific Associate Dr. Amanda Mitchell. "For the first time, we have married together knowledge of stem cell biology and genetics - areas that historically have often been operating as separate camps - to identify mutations stem cells carry and how they are related to one another in AML," says Dr. Dick, who pioneered the cancer stem cell field by identifying leukemia stem cells in 1994. A decade ago, he replicated the entire human leukemia disease process by introducing oncogenes into normal human blood cells, transplanting them into xenografts (special immune-deficient mice that accept human grafts) and watching leukemia develop - a motherlode discovery that has guided leukemia research ever since. The researchers set out to solve the mystery of AML relapse by analysing paired patient samples of blood taken at the initial clinic visit and blood taken post-treatment when disease recurred. "First, we asked what are the similarities and differences between these samples. We carried out detailed genetic studies and used whole genome sequencing to look at every part of the DNA at diagnosis, and every part of the DNA at relapse," says Dr. Dick. "Next, we asked in which cells are genetic changes occurring." The two-part approach netted a set of mutations seen only at relapse that enabled the team to sift and sort leukemic and normal stem cells using tools developed in the Dick lab a few years ago to zero in on specific cell types fated to relapse. "This is a story that couldn't have happened five years ago, but with the evolution of deep sequencing, we were able to use the technology at just the right time and harness it with what we've been working on for decades," he says. Today's findings augment recent research also published in Nature (Dec.7, 2016) detailing the team's development of a "stemness biomarker" - a 17-gene signature derived from leukemia stem cells that can predict at diagnosis which AML patients will respond to standard treatment. Dr. Dick says: "Our new findings add to that knowledge and we hope that we will soon have a new biomarker that will tell whether a patient will respond to standard chemotherapy, and then another to track patients in remission to identify those where treatment failed and the rare leukemia stem cells are coming back. "These new kinds of biomarkers will lead to new kinds of clinical trials with targeted chemotherapy. Right now, everybody gets one size fits all because in AML we've never had any opportunity to identify patients upfront, only after they relapse. Now we have the first step to identify these patients at the outset and during remission." The research was funded by the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, the Cancer Stem Cell Consortium via Genome Canada and the Ontario Genomics Institute, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, the Canadian Cancer Society, the Terry Fox Foundation, a Canada Research Chair and The Princess Margaret Cancer Foundation. The Princess Margaret Cancer Centre has achieved an international reputation as a global leader in the fight against cancer and delivering personalized cancer medicine. The Princess Margaret, one of the top five international cancer research centres, is a member of the University Health Network, which also includes Toronto General Hospital, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto Rehabilitation Institute and the Michener Institute for Education; all affiliated with the University of Toronto. For more information, go to http://www. or http://www. .


News Article | July 7, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The Princess Margaret Cancer Foundation announces a 'Game-Changing' online auction for once-in-a-lifetime meet and greets and private lunches with high profile celebrities and business leaders including: Celine Dion, Robert Herjavec- from Shark Tank, Stephen Amell- from Arrow, Michael Smith- Celebrity Chef, John Ruffolo- CEO of OMERS Ventures, Jack Armstrong- Toronto Raptors sportscaster, Larry Rosen- CEO of Harry Rosen and Heather Reisman- CEO of Indigo.Full details of each experience package and meet-and-greet details can be found at: http://gamechangersauction.com Proceeds from this auction benefit the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, one of the Top 5 Cancer Research Centres in the World. “This 'Game-Changers' auction gives fans the opportunity to meet their favorite celebrity for an ultimate meet-and-greet- all while supporting an important cause,” says Nick Taylor of The Princess Margaret Cancer Foundation. “We hope to raise significant funds, while giving some lucky fans an experience they will never forget.” The online auction is now live at http://gamechangersauction.com and ends on July 14, 2017 at 10:00 P.M (ET). About Princess Margaret Cancer Centre The Princess Margaret Cancer Centre has achieved an international reputation as a global leader in the fight against cancer and delivering Personalized Cancer Medicine. The Princess Margaret, one of the top 5 cancer research centres in the world, is a member of the University Health Network, which also includes Toronto General Hospital, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto Rehabilitation Institute and The Michener Institute for Education at UHN. All are research hospitals affiliated with the University of Toronto. http://www.theprincessmargaret.ca About The Princess Margaret Cancer Foundation The Princess Margaret Cancer Foundation at University Health Network is raising funds to lead the way in Personalized Cancer Medicine at the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, which includes The Campbell Family Cancer Research Institute and The Campbell Family Institute for Breast Cancer Research http://www.thepmcf.ca For further information: Media Contacts: Nick Taylor, Chief Golf Officer, The Princess Margaret Cancer Foundation, (416)993-5720, Nick.taylor(at)thepmcf(dot)ca; Ivy Cuervo, Director, Brand Communications, The Princess Margaret Cancer Foundation, (416) 946-4661, ivy.cuervo(at)thepmcf(dot)ca


News Article | August 7, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

(TORONTO, Canada - Aug. 7, 2017) - Prostate cancer researchers have mapped the impact of an acquired mutation that alters epigenetic identity, the make-up of DNA, in about 50% of patient tumour samples. The discovery also identifies a new opportunity for targeted therapy. The findings are published online today in Nature Genetics. The research shows how an acquired mutation involving the fusion of two genes (TMPRSS2 and ERG) can change the epigenetic identity of tumours leading to some genes being turned on while others are turned off, says Dr. Mathieu Lupien, corresponding author and Senior Scientist at Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, and a member of its Cancer Epigenetics Program, a team focused on breaking the code of cancer. Dr. Lupien is also an Associate Professor in the Department of Biomedical Physics, University of Toronto. The discoveries highlight the power of mutations to influence epigenetics in prostate tumours to change the identity of cancer cells. Dr. Lupien's team exploited this fact to identify mechanisms that drive development of fusion-positive prostate cancer. "Our findings specifically show that fusion-positive prostate cancer is dependent on the NOTCH signalling pathway, which can be blocked chemically in pre-clinical models," says Dr. Lupien. "This identifies a promising druggable target against fusion-positive prostate cancer and takes us a step closer to providing personalized cancer medicine for up to 50% of prostate cancer patients," he says. "We're hopeful this research can be translated into clinical care in the near future to offer patients an additional, tailored treatment to complement the current standard of care, based on their fusion profile." The study team consisted of scientists, pathologists and clinician-scientists involved in the Canadian Prostate Cancer Genome Network (CPC-GENE), the world-leading prostate cancer sequencing program co-led by Dr. Robert Bristow at the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre and Dr. Paul Boutros at the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research. The research published today was supported by the Movember Foundation through Prostate Cancer Canada, the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research funded by the Government of Ontario, and The Princess Margaret Cancer Foundation. The Princess Margaret Cancer Centre has achieved an international reputation as a global leader in the fight against cancer and delivering personalized cancer medicine. The Princess Margaret, one of the top five international cancer research centres, is a member of the University Health Network, which also includes Toronto General Hospital, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto Rehabilitation Institute and the Michener Institute for Education; all affiliated with the University of Toronto. For more information, go to http://www. or http://www. .


News Article | August 4, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

(TORONTO, Canada - Aug. 4, 2017) - Neuroscientists have uncovered the genetic basis for why many long-term survivors of childhood cancer develop meningiomas, the most common adult brain tumour, decades after their treatment with cranial radiation. The findings, published online today in Nature Communications, show that radiation causes genetic rearrangements in DNA that result in meningiomas, say co-principal investigators Gelareh Zadeh, neurosurgeon-scientist, Head of Surgical Oncology, and Ken Aldape, neuropathologist-scientist, Director, MacFeeters-Hamilton Neuro-Oncology Research Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network. Dr. Zadeh is an Associate Professor, Division of Neurosurgery, and holds the Wilkins Family Chair in Brain Tumor Research; and Dr. Aldape, Professor, Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, both at University of Toronto. The study compared and contrasted the biology of radiation-induced meningiomas (RIMs) to those that appear sporadically in the general population. "Radiation-induced meningiomas appear the same on MRI and pathology, feel the same during surgery and look the same under the operating microscope. What's different is they are more aggressive, tend to recur in multiples and invade the brain, causing significant morbidity and limitations (or impairments) for individuals who survive following childhood radiation," says Dr. Zadeh. The research team analyzed RIMs from patients who had received cranial-spinal radiation as children; the majority of whom (74%) had survived either leukemia or pediatric brain cancer. The study also showed that RIMs developed regardless of the radiation dose by collaborating with scientists in Germany where low-dose radiation was a common treatment many years ago for scalp ringworm. "By understanding the biology, the goal is to identify a therapeutic strategy that could be implemented early on after childhood radiation to prevent the formation of these tumours in the first place," says Dr. Zadeh. Dr. Aldape says: "It is an important clinical problem because it presents a paradoxical dilemma that while cranial-spinal radiation is needed to cure many childhood cancers, an unfortunate consequence is that 10-to-15-years following radiation treatment some survivors develop meningiomas. "Our research identified a specific rearrangement involving the NF2 gene that causes radiation-induced meningiomas. But there are likely other genetic rearrangements that are occurring as a result of that radiation-induced DNA damage. So one of the next steps is to identify what the radiation is doing to the DNA of the meninges." He adds: "In addition, identifying the subset of childhood cancer patients who are at highest risk to develop meningioma is critical so that they could be followed closely for early detection and management." The research was funded by Canadian Institutes of Health Research, the MacFeeters-Hamilton Neuro-Oncology Research Program, the Wilkins Family Chair in Brain Tumor Research, and The Princess Margaret Cancer Foundation. The Princess Margaret Cancer Centre has achieved an international reputation as a global leader in the fight against cancer and delivering personalized cancer medicine. The Princess Margaret, one of the top five international cancer research centres, is a member of the University Health Network, which also includes Toronto General Hospital, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto Rehabilitation Institute and the Michener Institute for Education; all affiliated with the University of Toronto. For more information, go to http://www. or http://www. .


News Article | December 23, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

In findings they call counterintuitive, a team of UCLA-led researchers suggests that blocking a protein, which is crucial to initiating the immune response against viral infections, may actually help combat HIV. Findings from a study in animals appear to demonstrate that temporarily blocking a type of protein, called type I interferon, can restore immune function and speed up viral suppression during treatment with anti-viral drugs for people with chronic infection of the virus that causes AIDS. This is the first study to show the role that type I interferon plays in driving the body's immune destruction during HIV infection, said Scott Kitchen, associate professor of medicine in the division of hematology/oncology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and senior author of the study published in the peer-reviewed Journal of Clinical Investigation. "This finding is completely counterintuitive, because many believe that the more interferon at work, the better," said Kitchen, a member of the UCLA AIDS Institute. "We show that the type of interferon being produced during chronic stages of HIV infection has detrimental effects on the body's ability to fight off HIV and other types of infection or cancer and could actually be contributing to accelerated HIV disease." HIV cripples the immune system by destroying immune cells called CD4 T cells, which are activated during early HIV infection by type I interferon. CD4 T cells are also known as "helper" cells because they signal another type of T cell, the CD8, to destroy HIV-infected cells. Also, HIV evades the body's CD8 cells by constantly mutating, escaping recognition by CD8 cells and making them ineffective. The chronically heightened state of inflammation and activation eventually leads to what is known as immune exhaustion when the immune cells can no longer function properly to clear infected cells. This, along with the loss of CD4 T cells ultimately leads to the destruction of the immune system. The researchers' idea is to block type I interferon to reduce chronic activation of the immune cells, which could give the exhausted CD8 T cells the opportunity to restore their abilities to fighting strength. Combine that with antiretroviral therapy and it may be possible to both restore immune function and eradicate HIV throughout the body. The researchers used "humanized mice," which have had their immune systems replaced with human immune system cells, thymus tissue and bone marrow. They treated HIV-infected mice with antibodies that blocked type I interferons, which allowed the mice's immune systems to revert from the state of exhaustion. This made it possible for their immune systems to produce sufficient amounts of CD8 T cells that were primed to attack and kill HIV-infected cells. When combined with antiretroviral therapy, the treatment accelerated the effect of antiretroviral therapy in suppressing HIV. "We found -- counterintuitively -- that blocking this immune response against the virus had beneficial effects in lowering the amounts of virus and increasing the ability of the immune response to clear out the virus," said Kitchen, who is also director of the UCLA Humanized Mouse Core Laboratory. Kitchen noted that these findings offer a proof of principle in a humanized mouse system and are not definitive. More experiments are needed in non-human primates before moving on to human clinical trials to determine whether the researchers' theory holds up and this treatment is safe in humans. But the findings offer a new perspective into the function of type I interferon during untreated and treated HIV chronic infection, said Anjie Zhen, a postdoctoral scholar and member of the UCLA AIDS Institute who led the study. "This could have profound implications for the development of therapies that include such approaches as interferon alpha therapy," Zhen said. "This shows that a proper balance is required when administering this type of therapy, where too much can have detrimental effects in suppressing important immune responses." Study co-authors are Valerie Rezek, Cindy Youn, Brianna Lam, Nelson Chang, Jonathan Rick, Mayra Carrillo, Heather Martin, Saro Kasparian, Philip Syed, and Nicholas Rice of UCLA, and David Brooks of the Princess Margaret Cancer Center in Toronto, Canada and of the University of Toronto. Grants from the National Institutes of Health (AI078806, AI110306-01, AI085043, T32AI060567), the UCLA AIDS Institute (P30AI28697), the California Center for Regenerative Medicine (TR4-06845), the UC Multicampus Research Program and Initiatives, the California Center for Antiviral Drug Discovery, the California HIV/AIDS Research Program (F12-LA-215) and the UCLA Center for AIDS Research (AI28697) funded this study.


News Article | December 14, 2016
Site: www.accesswire.com

TORONTO, ON / ACCESSWIRE / December 14, 2016 / Theralase Technologies Inc. ("Theralase" or the "Company") (TSXV: TLT) (OTC: TLTFF), a leading biotech company focused on the commercialization of medical devices to eliminate pain and the development of Photo Dynamic Compounds ("PDCs") to destroy cancer, announced today that it has released the video presentations conducted at the end of its Annual General and Special Meeting held on December 9, 2016 in Toronto, Canada. The presentations were delivered by Dr. Lothar Lilge, Senior Scientist, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, University Health Network ("UHN") and Dr. Girish Kulkarni, Uro-Oncologist, also from UHN. The video of the presentations may be viewed at: Roger Dumoulin-White, President and CEO of Theralase stated that, "Theralase has made significant advances in 2016 in both of its divisions. In the TLT division, Theralase has successfully commercialized its next generation TLC-2000 therapeutic laser system in both Canada and the US. In the PDT division, Theralase has achieved its primary objective of commencing a Phase Ib clinical trial for Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer, using its lead, light-activated PDC, TLD-1433." Theralase Technologies Inc. ("Theralase®" or the "Company") (TSXV: TLT) (OTC: TLTFF) in its Therapeutic Laser Technology ("TLT") division designs, manufactures, markets and distributes patented super-pulsed laser technology indicated for the treatment of chronic knee pain and in off-label use the elimination of pain, reduction of inflammation and dramatic acceleration of tissue healing for numerous nerve, muscle and joint conditions. Theralase's Photo Dynamic Therapy ("PDT") division researches and develops specially designed molecules called Photo Dynamic Compounds ("PDCs"), which are able to localize to cancer cells and then when laser light activated, effectively destroy them. Additional information is available at www.theralase.com and www.sedar.com. This news release contains "forward-looking statements" which reflect the current expectations of management of the Corporation's future growth, results of operations, performance and business prospects and opportunities. Such statements include, but are not limited to, statements regarding the proposed use of proceeds.. Wherever possible, words such as "may", "would", "could", "should", "will", "anticipate", "believe", "plan", "expect", "intend", "estimate", "potential for" and similar expressions have been used to identify these forward-looking statements. These statements reflect management's current beliefs with respect to future events and are based on information currently available to management. Forward-looking statements involve significant risks, uncertainties and assumptions. Many factors could cause the Corporation's actual results, performance or achievements to be materially different from any future results, performance or achievements that may be expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements; including, without limitation, those listed in the filings made by the Corporation with the Canadian securities regulatory authorities (which may be viewed at www.sedar.com). Should one or more of these risks or uncertainties materialize, or should assumptions underlying the forward looking statements prove incorrect, actual results, performance or achievements may vary materially from those expressed or implied by the forward-looking statements contained in this news release. These factors should be considered carefully and prospective investors should not place undue reliance on the forward-looking statements. Although the forward-looking statements contained in the news release are based upon what management currently believes to be reasonable assumptions, the Corporation cannot assure prospective investors that actual results, performance or achievements will be consistent with these forward-looking statements. The Corporation disclaims any intention or obligation to revise forward-looking statements whether as a result of new information, future developments or otherwise except as required by law. All forward-looking statements are expressly qualified in their entirety by this cautionary statement. Neither TSX Venture Exchange nor its Regulation Services Provider (as that term is defined in the policies of the TSX Venture Exchanges) accepts responsibility for the adequacy or accuracy of this release.


Wilson M.K.,Princess Margaret Cancer Center | Karakasis K.,Princess Margaret Cancer Center | Oza A.M.,Princess Margaret Cancer Center
The Lancet Oncology | Year: 2015

Cancer treatment should allow patients to live better or longer lives, and ideally, both. Trial endpoints should show clinically meaningful improvements in patient survival or quality of life. Alternative endpoints such as progression-free survival, disease-free survival, and objective response rate have been used to identify benefit earlier, but their true validity as surrogate endpoints is controversial. In this Review we discuss the measurement, assessment, and benefits and limitations of trial endpoints in use for cancer treatment. Many stakeholders are affected, including regulatory agencies, industry partners, clinicians, and most importantly, patients. In an accompanying Review, reflections from individual stakeholders are incorporated into a discussion of what the future holds for clinical trial endpoints and design. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.


Sahgal A.,Princess Margaret Cancer Center
Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology | Year: 2013

Vertebral compression fracture (VCF) is increasingly recognized as an adverse event after spine stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). We report a multi-institutional study aimed at clarifying the risk and predictive factors associated with VCF. A total of 252 patients with 410 spinal segments treated with SBRT were included. The primary outcome was the development of VCF (a new VCF or progression of a baseline VCF). In addition to various patient-, treatment-, and tumor-specific factors, the Spinal Instability Neoplastic Scoring (SINS) system was applied to determine predictive value. The median follow-up was 11.5 months (range, 0.03 to 113 months). The median and mean overall survival rates were 16 and 26 months, respectively. We observed 57 fractures (57 of 410, 14%), with 47% (27 of 57) new fractures and 53% (30 of 57) fracture progression. The median time to VCF was 2.46 months (range, 0.03 to 43.01 months), and 65% occurred within the first 4 months. The 1- and 2-year cumulative incidences of fracture were 12.35% and 13.49%, respectively. Multivariable analysis identified dose per fraction (greatest risk for ≥ 24 Gy v 20 to 23 Gy v ≤ 19 Gy), in addition to three of the six original SINS criteria: baseline VCF, lytic tumor, and spinal deformity, as significant predictors of VCF. Caution must be observed when treating with ≥ 20 Gy/fraction, in particular, for patients with lytic tumor, spinal misalignment, and a baseline VCF. Frequent short-term follow-up is required, as nearly two thirds of all VCF occurred within the first 4 months. We also conclude that SINS may have utility in predicting patients at high risk of SBRT-induced VCF.

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