Princess Alexandria Hospital

Brisbane, Australia

Princess Alexandria Hospital

Brisbane, Australia
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Johns A.L.,Garvan Institute of Medical Research | McKay S.H.,Garvan Institute of Medical Research | Humphris J.L.,Garvan Institute of Medical Research | Pinese M.,Garvan Institute of Medical Research | And 132 more authors.
Genome Medicine | Year: 2017

Background: The return of research results (RoR) remains a complex and well-debated issue. Despite the debate, actual data related to the experience of giving individual results back, and the impact these results may have on clinical care and health outcomes, is sorely lacking. Through the work of the Australian Pancreatic Cancer Genome Initiative (APGI) we: (1) delineate the pathway back to the patient where actionable research data were identified; and (2) report the clinical utilisation of individual results returned. Using this experience, we discuss barriers and opportunities associated with a comprehensive process of RoR in large-scale genomic research that may be useful for others developing their own policies. Methods: We performed whole-genome (n = 184) and exome (n = 208) sequencing of matched tumour-normal DNA pairs from 392 patients with sporadic pancreatic cancer (PC) as part of the APGI. We identified pathogenic germline mutations in candidate genes (n = 130) with established predisposition to PC or medium-high penetrance genes with well-defined cancer associated syndromes or phenotypes. Variants from candidate genes were annotated and classified according to international guidelines. Variants were considered actionable if clinical utility was established, with regard to prevention, diagnosis, prognostication and/or therapy. Results: A total of 48,904 germline variants were identified, with 2356 unique variants undergoing annotation and in silico classification. Twenty cases were deemed actionable and were returned via previously described RoR framework, representing an actionable finding rate of 5.1%. Overall, 1.78% of our cohort experienced clinical benefit from RoR. Conclusion: Returning research results within the context of large-scale genomics research is a labour-intensive, highly variable, complex operation. Results that warrant action are not infrequent, but the prevalence of those who experience a clinical difference as a result of returning individual results is currently low. © 2017 The Author(s).


Chadban S.,Royal Prince Alfred Hospital | Eris J.,Royal Prince Alfred Hospital | Russ G.,Royal Adelaide Hospital | Campbell S.,Princess Alexandria Hospital | And 10 more authors.
Nephrology | Year: 2013

Aim Cyclosporine (CsA), dosed to achieve C2 targets, has been shown to provide safe and efficacious immunosuppression when used with a mycophenolate and steroids for de novo kidney transplant recipients. This study examined whether use of enteric-coated mycophenolate sodium (EC-MPS) together with basiliximab and steroids would enable use of CsA dosed to reduced C2 targets in order to achieve improved graft function. Methods Twelve-month, prospective, randomized, open-label trial in de novo kidney transplant recipients in Australia. Seventy-five patients were randomized to receive either usual exposure (n = 33) or reduced exposure (n = 42) CsA, EC-MPS 720 mg twice daily, basiliximab and corticosteroids. Results There was no significant difference in mean Cockcroft-Gault CrCl (creatinine clearance) (60.2 ± 17.6 mL/min per 1.73 m2 vs 63.2 ± 24.3, P = 0.64 for usual versus reduced exposure respectively) at 6 months. There was no significant difference between treatment groups in the incidence of treatment failure defined as biopsy proven acute rejection, graft loss or death (secondary endpoint: 30.3% full exposure vs 35.7% reduced exposure). At 12 months the incidence of overall adverse events was the same in both groups. Conclusion This exploratory study suggests de novo renal transplant patients can safely receive a treatment regimen of either full or reduced exposure CsA in combination with EC-MPS, corticosteroids and basiliximab, with no apparent difference in efficacy or graft function during the first year after transplant. © 2012 The Authors. Nephrology © 2012 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.


Johnston C.I.,The University of Notre Dame Australia | O'Leary M.A.,University of Newcastle | Brown S.G.A.,University of Western Australia | Currie B.J.,Royal Darwin Hospital | And 62 more authors.
PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases | Year: 2012

Background: Death adders (Acanthophis spp) are found in Australia, Papua New Guinea and parts of eastern Indonesia. This study aimed to investigate the clinical syndrome of death adder envenoming and response to antivenom treatment. Methodology/Principal Findings: Definite death adder bites were recruited from the Australian Snakebite Project (ASP) as defined by expert identification or detection of death adder venom in blood. Clinical effects and laboratory results were collected prospectively, including the time course of neurotoxicity and response to treatment. Enzyme immunoassay was used to measure venom concentrations. Twenty nine patients had definite death adder bites; median age 45 yr (5-74 yr); 25 were male. Envenoming occurred in 14 patients. Two further patients had allergic reactions without envenoming, both snake handlers with previous death adder bites. Of 14 envenomed patients, 12 developed neurotoxicity characterised by ptosis (12), diplopia (9), bulbar weakness (7), intercostal muscle weakness (2) and limb weakness (2). Intubation and mechanical ventilation were required for two patients for 17 and 83 hours. The median time to onset of neurotoxicity was 4 hours (0.5-15.5 hr). One patient bitten by a northern death adder developed myotoxicity and one patient only developed systemic symptoms without neurotoxicity. No patient developed venom induced consumption coagulopathy. Antivenom was administered to 13 patients, all receiving one vial initially. The median time for resolution of neurotoxicity post-antivenom was 21 hours (5-168). The median peak venom concentration in 13 envenomed patients with blood samples was 22 ng/mL (4.4-245 ng/mL). In eight patients where post-antivenom bloods were available, no venom was detected after one vial of antivenom. Conclusions/Significance: Death adder envenoming is characterised by neurotoxicity, which is mild in most cases. One vial of death adder antivenom was sufficient to bind all circulating venom. The persistent neurological effects despite antivenom, suggests that neurotoxicity is not reversed by antivenom. © 2012 Johnston et al.

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