Hamza, Jordan
Hamza, Jordan

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Al-Ani A.H.,Bahrain Specialist Hospital | Al Kela T.,Prince Hamza Hospital
Journal of the Bahrain Medical Society | Year: 2013

Background: Diabetes mellitus is a common metabolic disorder in non-tropical countries. Hand complications are very infrequent in comparison with foot complications. Tropical diabetic hand syndrome has been documented in tropical countries and it is suggested that it may occur in non-tropical countries, but is seldom recorded. Objectives: To document the presence, the causes and the mode of presentation of diabetic hand syndrome in non-tropical countries. Methods: In the period 1st of February 2009 to the 5th of March 2010 five cases of diabetic hand syndrome were studied in Al Basher teaching hospital, Amman, Jordan. On admission a detailed history and physical examination were undertaken. This included fasting blood sugar estimation, deep wound swabs and plain x-rays of the affected limbs. Results: Three of the patients were males and two were females. Their ages ranged from 55 to 74 years, with a mean of 64.5 years. The left hand was affected in three patients; while the right was affected in the other two. The clinical history of diabetes ranged from 10 to 15 years, with a mean of 11.75 years. Three patients presented with an ulcer, one with an abscess and the other presented with gangrene. The ring finger was affected in two patients, the middle finger in one, the palm in one and the dorsum of the hand in one patient. More than one microorganism was isolated from all the swab cultures; however, Staphylococcus aureus was the most common organism. Conclusion: Although it is very infrequent in non-tropical countries, diabetic hand syndrome is a devastating cause of morbidity and mortality particularly in negligent, senescent patients with poorly controlled and long standing diabetes.


Tayyem R.F.,Hashemite University | Shehadeh I.N.,KHCC | AbuMweis S.S.,Hashemite University | Bawadi H.A.,Jordan University of Science and Technology | And 4 more authors.
Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention | Year: 2013

Background: Physical activity has been found to play a role in cancer prevention. The purpose of this matched case-control study was to investigate the association between physical activity levels, water intake, constipation and colorectal cancer (CRC). Materials and Methods: Two hundred and thirty-two patients diagnosed with CRC (125 male, 107 female) were enrolled in this case-control study. Cases were matched to 271 population controls (137 male, 134 female). Results: Drinking more than 4 cups of water daily decreased the risk of CRC by 33-42%; however, this effect was non-significant. Having constipation was found to be a significant risk factor for developing CRC with an OR=6.284 (95%CI=2.741-14.40). With reference to sedentary behavior, minimum activity (600-3000 Metabolic Equivalents Task (MET)) had 43% protection against CRC and the level of Health Enhancing Physical Activity OR was 0.58 (at 95%CI; 0.37-0.92). A significant negative association was found between CRC and physical activity levels expressed as both METs and MET-hours/week (p for trend=0.017 and 0.03, respectively). Among females, a significant trend of reduction in CRC by 62% was observed with increasing the level of physical activity expressed in MET (p for trend=0.04). Conclusions: The risk of CRC may be reduced by adopting a healthy lifestyle and practicing physically activity regularly, especially among females. Consuming adequate amounts of water and healthy bowel motility could also reduce the risk of CRC.


PubMed | Queen Rania Childrens Hospital, Al Bashir Government Hospital, Mu'tah University, Prince Hamza Hospital and 2 more.
Type: | Journal: The West Indian medical journal | Year: 2015

The purpose of this study was to find out the aetiology of end-stage renal failure (ESRF) in children in Jordan.This was a multicentre retrospective study at five participating hospitals. Data collection included medical record review for age, gender, aetiology of ESRF, modality of renal replacement therapy (RRT) and outcome. End-stage renal failure was defined as estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) < 15 ml/min/1.73m2.There were 275 children with ESRF. Males were 131 and females 144. The most common causes of ESRF in children were congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT), 56.0%, heredofamilial disorders, 23.2% and glomerulopathies, 22.9%. Neurogenic bladder, reflux nephropathy and posterior urethral valve accounted for 16.8%, 12.7%, and 4.0%, respectively. Amongst the heredofamilial disorders, primary oxalosis and cystic disease accounted for 8.0% and 7.2% of the aetiologies of ESRF, respectively. Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis was the most common histological type amongst the glomerulopathies (10.2%), followed by mesangiocapillary glomerulonephritis (4.7%), and chronic glomerulonephritis (3.0%). The aetiology was unknown in 4% of the cases. Modality of dialysis included isolated peritoneal dialysis (PD) in 30.9%, isolated haemodialysis (HD) in 49.1%, alternating peritoneal and haemodialysis in 9.1%, transplanted in 8.7% and conservative treatment in 1.8%. Death occurred in 57.3% of PD patients versus 34.4% in HD patients.This is the first report on the aetiology of ESRF in children in Jordan. The most common aetiologies of ESRF in Jordan were CAKUT 56.0%, heredofamilial disorders 23.2%, and glomerulopathies 22.9%.


Ramahi I.,Prince Hamza Hospital | Seidenberg A.B.,Center for Global Tobacco Control | Kennedy R.D.,Center for Global Tobacco Control | Kennedy R.D.,University of Waterloo | Rees V.W.,Center for Global Tobacco Control
European Journal of Public Health | Year: 2013

Secondhand smoke levels were assessed among a convenience sample of 15 public venues in Amman, Jordan, during Ramadan. PM2.5 measurements were taken inside each venue pre- and post-'iftar', when daily smoking abstinence can be broken at sundown. Cigarette smoking was observed in all venues post-iftar, and the median PM2.5 level among the 15 venues (285 μg/m3) was significantly higher than the pre-iftar level (11 μg/m3; P < 0.001). Post-iftar PM2.5 levels exceeded the World Health Organization standard for particulate pollution by 5-20-fold. To protect public health in Jordan, smoke-free legislation should be enforced at all times of day, and all days of the year. © 2012 The Author 2012. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.


Nseir M.,Prince Hamza Hospital | Aughsteen A.A.,Hawler Medical University | Mahmood M.F.,Hashemite University | Al-Khayat M.,Hashemite University | And 2 more authors.
Indian Journal of Surgery | Year: 2013

Choledochal cysts are uncommon developmental anomalies involving intrahepatic and extrahepatic biliary ducts, and their immediate complete excision is recommended to prevent chronic inflammatory and malignant changes. A diagnosis of a congenital type 1C choledochal cyst was made in an 8-year-old female patient admitted to the emergency unit with complaints of severe upper abdominal pain and vomiting. Under laparotomy, resection of the whole segment of choledochal cyst and gallbladder, assisted Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy was performed. The laparotomy approach involving fine dissection and resection of choledochal cysts with Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy remains superior to the endoscopic approach. © Association of Surgeons of India 2012.


Tayyem R.F.,University of Jordan | Bawadi H.A.,Qatar University | Shehadah I.,King Hussein Cancer Center | Agraib L.M.,Hashemite University | And 5 more authors.
Clinical Nutrition | Year: 2016

Background & aims: Dietary pattern and lifestyle have been reported to be important risk factors in the development of colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the mechanism of action of dietary factors in CRC disease is unclear. The aim of this study is the examination of several dietary choices and their potential association with the risk of developing CRC. Methods: Dietary data was collected from 220 subjects who were previously diagnosed with CRC, and 281 control subjects (matched by age, gender, occupation and marital status). The data was collected between January 2010 and December 2012, using interview-based questionnaires. Multivariate logistic regression was used to estimate the relationship between dietary choices and risk of developing colorectal cancer. Results: Factor analysis revealed three major dietary patterns. The first pattern we identified as the "Healthy Pattern", the second was identified as "High Sugar/High Tea Pattern" and the third as "Western Pattern". In the Healthy Pattern group we found a 10.54% variation in food intake, while the intake variation was 11.64% in the Western Pattern. After adjusting for confounding factors, the Western Pattern food choice was found to be significantly associated with an increased risk of developing CRC (OR = 1.88; 95% CI = 1.12-3.16). The results for the Healthy and High-Sugar/High Tea Patterns showed a decrease, but the statistic was not significant for the risk of CRC development. Conclusion: The Western Pattern of dietary choice was directly associated with CRC. The association between the dietary food choice in the Healthy and High-Sugar/High Tea Patterns and colorectal cancer needs further study in our Jordanian population. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.


Tayyem R.F.,Hashemite University | Shehadah I.,King Hussein Cancer Center | Abu-Mweis S.S.,Hashemite University | Bawadi H.A.,Jordan University of Science and Technology | And 4 more authors.
Cancer Control | Year: 2014

Results: Total vegetable intake was associated with the risk of developing CRC. Consuming 5 servings of vegetables a day decreased the risk of developing CRC when compared with no more than 1 serving a day (odds ratio [OR] = 0.23; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.55-0.97). A significant direct relationship between CRC risk and consuming cauliflower and cabbage was found; however, no association was found for raw or cooked leafy vegetable and other vegetable types. Consuming several types of fruits also revealed no association with risk of CRC, although an increased intake of dates and figs was associated with a reduced risk of developing CRC. The ORs for the highest intake of servings compared with the lowest intake were 0.48 (95% CI: 0.27-0.87; P =.004) for dates and 0.604 (95% CI: 0.35-1.06; P =.003) for figs.Conclusions: Consuming fruits and vegetables did not significantly correlate with a lowered incidence of CRC. However, a trend of protection was detected for several types of fruits and vegetables.Background: Diets that include fruits and vegetables have been suggested as one way to reduce the risk of developing colorectal cancer (CRC); however, the association between consuming fruits and vegetables and CRC risk is not clear. The objective of the present study is to compare fruit and vegetable intake between 2 groups of Jordanians and further investigate this possible relationship.Methods: A history of fruit and vegetable consumption was obtained from 220 people with CRC and 281 healthy controls, all of whom were from Jordan. Both groups were matched for age, sex, occupation, and marital status. Fruit and vegetable consumption was quantified for the previous 12 months in both groups. © 2014, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute. All rights reserved.


PubMed | King Hussein Cancer Center, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Qatar University, University of California at San Diego and 3 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of human nutrition and dietetics : the official journal of the British Dietetic Association | Year: 2016

Data from several studies suggest that a diet high in meat, including processed meat and fat, may have an association with the development of colorectal cancer (CRC).The present study aimed to investigate the relationship between meats, dairy products, fat consumption and the risk of CRC in Jordanians. A case-control study was performed at the five largest hospitals in Jordan. Dietary data were collected from 220 diagnosed cases of CRC and 281 healthy disease-free controls. The CRC cases were matched as closely as possible to controls using age, sex, occupation and marital status.The consumption of different levels and frequencies of several food types, including meats, chicken, milk and fish, was found to be associated with the risk of developing CRC. Added fats and oils were inversely associated with CRC risk with odds ratio = 0.33 (95% confidence interval = 0.13-0.83, PThe results of the study suggest that the consumption of some types of meat, processed meats and Labaneh (strained yogurt) may be associated with the risk of developing CRC.


PubMed | King Hussein Cancer Center, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Qatar University, University of California at San Diego and 2 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Nutrients | Year: 2015

Diet and lifestyle have been reported to be important risk factors for the development of colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the association between total energy and nutrient intake and the risk of developing CRC has not been clearly explained. The aim of our study is to examine the relationship between total energy intake and other nutrients and the development of CRC in the Jordanian population.Dietary data was collected from 169 subjects who were previously diagnosed with CRC, and 248 control subjects (matched by age, gender, occupation and marital status). These control subjects were healthy and disease free. Data was collected between January 2010 and December 2012, using interview-based questionnaires. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between quartiles of total energy, macro- and micronutrient intakes with the risk of developing CRC in our study population.Total energy intake was associated with a higher risk of developing CRC (OR = 2.60 for the highest versus lowest quartile of intake; 95% CI: 1.21-5.56, p-trend = 0.03). Intakes of protein (OR = 3.62, 95% CI: 1.63-8.05, p-trend = 0.002), carbohydrates (OR = 1.41, 95% CI: 0.67-2.99, p-trend = 0.043), and percentage of energy from fat (OR = 2.10, 95% CI: 0.38-11.70, p-trend = 0.009) significantly increased the risk for the development of CRC. Saturated fat, dietary cholesterol and sodium intake showed a significant association with the risk of developing CRC (OR = 5.23, 95% CI: 2.33-11.76; OR = 2.48, 95% CI: 1.18-5.21; and OR = 3.42, 95% CI: 1.59-7.38, respectively), while vitamin E and caffeine intake were indicative of a protective effect against the development of CRC, OR = 0.002 (95% CI: 0.0003-0.011) and 0.023 (95%CI: 0.008-0.067), respectively.Our results suggest an increased risk for the development of CRC in subjects with high dietary intake of energy, protein, saturated fat, cholesterol, and sodium, and diets high in vitamin E and caffeine were suggestive of a protective effect against the risk of developing CRC.This is the first study in Jordan to suggest that it may be possible to reduce CRC risk by adjusting the intake of some macro-and micronutrients.


PubMed | Prince Hamza Hospital
Type: Journal Article | Journal: European journal of public health | Year: 2013

Secondhand smoke levels were assessed among a convenience sample of 15 public venues in Amman, Jordan, during Ramadan. PM2.5 measurements were taken inside each venue pre- and post-iftar, when daily smoking abstinence can be broken at sundown. Cigarette smoking was observed in all venues post-iftar, and the median PM(2.5) level among the 15 venues (285 g/m(3)) was significantly higher than the pre-iftar level (11 g/m(3); P < 0.001). Post-iftar PM(2.5) levels exceeded the World Health Organization standard for particulate pollution by 5-20-fold. To protect public health in Jordan, smoke-free legislation should be enforced at all times of day, and all days of the year.

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