Pride Veterinary Center

Derby, United Kingdom

Pride Veterinary Center

Derby, United Kingdom

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Wessmann A.,Pride Veterinary Center | Wessmann A.,University of Glasgow | Volk H.A.,Royal Veterinary College | Parkin T.,University of Glasgow | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine | Year: 2014

Background: The impact of epilepsy and its treatment on the quality of life (QoL) is considered an important part of treatment supervision in human epilepsy. Objectives: To develop a list of key questions evaluating QoL in dogs with idiopathic epilepsy (IE) and their carers. Animals: One hundred fifty-nine dogs with IE. Methods: Cross-sectional study. An online project questionnaire was developed containing 90 QoL-associated questions that were initially allocated to 14 themes representing specific areas associated with the treatment and care of an epileptic dog. Principal component analysis was applied with the aim of refining the questionnaire to the least number of questions representing useful themes without loss of descriptive value. Carers were recruited by paper mail, primary practices, and canine epilepsy websites. Data were acquired from January to November 2011. Results: Principal component analysis removed 54 questions, leaving 7 themes with 36 questions with a minimum Cronbach's alpha value of 0.7 indicating a good internal consistency: "Seizure severity and frequency", "Adverse effects of antiepileptic drug (AED)", "Restrictions on the carer's life", "Frustrations over caring for a dog with IE", "Carer distaste of AED adverse effects", "Carer anxiety around the seizure event", "Perceptions on rectal diazepam use". Conclusions and Clinical Importance: Principal component analysis successfully reduced the number of questions without loss in descriptive value. The remaining questions correlate well with each other in capturing valuable details about aspects of QoL and represent valuable key questions (EpiQoL) in the assessment of QoL for the carers of dogs with IE. © 2014 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.


Calvo I.,University of Glasgow | Aisa J.,University College Dublin | Chase D.,Pride Veterinary Center | Garcia-Fernandez P.,Complutense University of Madrid | And 2 more authors.
Veterinary and Comparative Orthopaedics and Traumatology | Year: 2014

Objectives: To retrospectively compare two clinical subsets of dogs suffering tibial tuberosity (TT) fracture (incidental finding or sudden onset severe lameness) as a complication of tibial tuberosity advancement (TTA) and to report the surgical management and outcome of TT fracture as a complication of TTA. Material and methods: The medical records of 10 dogs with eleven TT fractures or crest fractures after TTA were reviewed. The outcome and complications were determined from clinical and radiographic follow-up examinations. Limb function was evaluated between six and 12 weeks postoperatively. Owners were contacted by phone for longterm follow-up at least six months after the last examination. Results: Four dogs required surgical stabilization and six dogs had conservative management. In the surgical group, every case experienced a sudden non-weight-bearing lameness after the initial TTA surgery. In three of the four cases an attempt was made to stabilize the TT and crest fracture while maintaining the TT advancement. Postoperative complications were encountered in three of the four surgically treated cases. Functional outcome was considered excellent in seven cases and good in the other three. Clinical significance: Tibial tuberosity fracture is a complication of TTA that seems to have a favourable prognosis, although it can result in significant morbidity and in some cases revision surgery may be required. © Schattauer 2014.


Woodbridge N.,University of Nottingham | Knuchel-Takano A.,University of Nottingham | Brissot H.,Pride Veterinary Center | Nelissen P.,University of Nottingham | And 2 more authors.
Veterinary and Comparative Orthopaedics and Traumatology | Year: 2014

Objective: To evaluate a tibial plateau levelling osteotomy (TPLO) saw blade positioning technique and to retrospectively evaluate the accuracy of the osteotomy position. Method: Preoperative and postoperative radiographs of 72 cases that had a TPLO surgery using a two-wire technique were reviewed. Three measurements (A1, B1, C1) were obtained in preoperative planning using a computer template system (Ortho-view Vet) which mapped the intended osteotomy position. The postoperative radiographs were analysed to determine the varia-bility of these three measurements (A2, B2, C2) and therefore the accuracy of the osteotomy. Results: On average the least variable measurement was B2 (5%) followed by C2 (7%) and then A2 (13%). The maximum mean difference between the intended position and achieved position was 1.5 mm. Clinical significance: Despite there being a significant difference between the intended and the actual position of the osteotomy, the variation between the intended and actual tibial tuberosity width was small (5%). None of the cases suffered a tibial tuberosity fracture, which also supports the clinical value of this technique. Care must be taken to avoid inadvertent cutting of the Kirschner guide wires. © Schattauer 2014.


Gutierrez-Quintana R.,University of Glasgow | Hammond G.,University of Glasgow | Wessmann A.,Pride Veterinary Center
Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery | Year: 2014

Cystic lesions affecting the vertebral canal or spinal cord have rarely been reported in cats. A 3-year-old female neutered domestic longhair cat presented for evaluation of a 2-year-history of episodes of ataxia and paresis affecting all limbs. Neurological examination was consistent with a lesion in the C1-C5 spinal cord segments. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a fluid-filled lesion at the occipito-atlanto-axial region causing dynamic spinal cord compression on flexion of the neck. The imaging characteristics were compatible with a juxta-articular cyst. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a fluid-filled lesion causing dynamic cervical spinal cord compression in a cat and highlights the importance of performing flexion-extension MRI views in diagnosing cases with dynamic spinal cord compression. © ISFM and AAFP 2013.


Murdoch A.P.,University of Cambridge | Michou J.N.,Pride Veterinary Center
Veterinary Journal | Year: 2016

A prospective, randomised, blinded, case-controlled clinical study was designed using client-owned dogs undergoing unilateral pelvic limb orthopaedic surgery, to determine the effect on induced motor activity by electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve distal to the site of local anaesthetic administration. Dogs were administered 0.5% bupivacaine either extradurally or via a femoral and transgluteal sciatic electrolocation-guided nerve block prior to pelvic limb surgery. Motor response to electrical stimulation of branches of the sciatic nerve was tested and the minimum current required to induce muscle twitch was recorded prior to bupivacaine administration. Provided sensory blockade had been deemed successful intraoperatively, testing was repeated postoperatively, with each dog acting as its own control. Paired t-tests were performed to compare pre- and postoperative minimum currents. Eleven dogs administered extradural and 11 dogs administered femoral and sciatic perineural bupivacaine were eligible for post-operative testing. All dogs displayed normal motor response to electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve at both sites tested before and after bupivacaine administration. There was no significant difference in the minimum current required to induce muscle twitch between pre- and post-operative testing (P = 0.31 sciatic site, P = 0.36 peroneal site), nor between the two groups using different loco-regional anaesthetic techniques (minimum P = 0.13). This study shows that stimulation of the sciatic nerve distal to the site of bupivacaine administration induces motor activity, despite adequate sensory blockade. This is relevant in surgical cases where mechanical stimulation of the sciatic nerve might be expected and needs to be recognised to avoid postoperative neurapraxia. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd.


Murdoch A.P.,Queen's University | Michou J.N.,Pride Veterinary Center
Veterinary Journal | Year: 2016

A prospective, randomised, blinded, case-controlled clinical study was designed using client-owned dogs undergoing unilateral pelvic limb orthopaedic surgery, to determine the effect on induced motor activity by electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve distal to the site of local anaesthetic administration. Dogs were administered 0.5% bupivacaine either extradurally or via a femoral and transgluteal sciatic electrolocation-guided nerve block prior to pelvic limb surgery. Motor response to electrical stimulation of branches of the sciatic nerve was tested and the minimum current required to induce muscle twitch was recorded prior to bupivacaine administration. Provided sensory blockade had been deemed successful intraoperatively, testing was repeated postoperatively, with each dog acting as its own control. Paired t-tests were performed to compare pre- and postoperative minimum currents.Eleven dogs administered extradural and 11 dogs administered femoral and sciatic perineural bupivacaine were eligible for post-operative testing. All dogs displayed normal motor response to electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve at both sites tested before and after bupivacaine administration. There was no significant difference in the minimum current required to induce muscle twitch between pre- and post-operative testing (P = 0.31 sciatic site, P = 0.36 peroneal site), nor between the two groups using different loco-regional anaesthetic techniques (minimum P = 0.13). This study shows that stimulation of the sciatic nerve distal to the site of bupivacaine administration induces motor activity, despite adequate sensory blockade. This is relevant in surgical cases where mechanical stimulation of the sciatic nerve might be expected and needs to be recognised to avoid postoperative neurapraxia. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.


PubMed | Pride Veterinary Center and Queen's University
Type: | Journal: Veterinary journal (London, England : 1997) | Year: 2016

A prospective, randomised, blinded, case-controlled clinical study was designed using client-owned dogs undergoing unilateral pelvic limb orthopaedic surgery, to determine the effect on induced motor activity by electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve distal to the site of local anaesthetic administration. Dogs were administered 0.5% bupivacaine either extradurally or via a femoral and transgluteal sciatic electrolocation-guided nerve block prior to pelvic limb surgery. Motor response to electrical stimulation of branches of the sciatic nerve was tested and the minimum current required to induce muscle twitch was recorded prior to bupivacaine administration. Provided sensory blockade had been deemed successful intraoperatively, testing was repeated postoperatively, with each dog acting as its own control. Paired t-tests were performed to compare pre- and postoperative minimum currents. Eleven dogs administered extradural and 11 dogs administered femoral and sciatic perineural bupivacaine were eligible for post-operative testing. All dogs displayed normal motor response to electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve at both sites tested before and after bupivacaine administration. There was no significant difference in the minimum current required to induce muscle twitch between pre- and post-operative testing (P=0.31 sciatic site, P=0.36 peroneal site), nor between the two groups using different loco-regional anaesthetic techniques (minimum P=0.13). This study shows that stimulation of the sciatic nerve distal to the site of bupivacaine administration induces motor activity, despite adequate sensory blockade. This is relevant in surgical cases where mechanical stimulation of the sciatic nerve might be expected and needs to be recognised to avoid postoperative neurapraxia.


PubMed | Royal Veterinary College RVC, University of Glasgow, Pride Veterinary Center and Centro Clinico Veterinary Indautxu
Type: Journal Article | Journal: The Veterinary record | Year: 2016

Quality of life (QoL) plays a significant role in the treatment of dogs with idiopathic epilepsy (IE), yet is so far understudied. This study describes the outcome evaluation of an online questionnaire based on the carers perception focusing on 62 QoL questions in 159 dogs with IE. Results showed that seizure frequency, but not seizure severity or presence of cluster seizures, was significantly associated with carer-perceived dogs QoL. Dogs receiving third-line antiepileptic drugs had a significantly lower perceived QoL than those that did not. Generalised linear mixed model analysis demonstrated that severity of the side effects sleeping more and ataxia were significantly associated with carer-perceived dogs QoL, with higher severities predicting lower QoL scores. The degree of carer acceptability of seizure frequency and severity was significantly associated with the dogs reported seizure frequency and severity. Moreover, there was a significant association between IE-related QoL changes of the dog and the carer, with reductions in perceived canine QoL scores associated with reductions in carer QoL, and vice versa. In conclusion, aspects of canine IE can affect both the carer and their dogs QoL. This has implications for the management and requires consideration when treatment options and outcomes are discussed.


PubMed | Pride Veterinary Center
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Veterinary and comparative orthopaedics and traumatology : V.C.O.T | Year: 2016

To retrospectively review and describe the incidence of complications associated with tibial tuberosity advancement (TTA) surgical procedures in a group of Boxer dogs (n = 36 stifles) and compare the data with a non-Boxer control population (n = 271 stifles).Retrospective analysis of medical records to identify all dogs that underwent TTA surgery due to cranial cruciate ligament disease. These records were categorized into two groups: Boxer dogs and non-Boxer dogs (controls - all other breeds).Of the 307 stifles included, 69 complications were reported in 58 joints. The complication rate differed significantly for Boxer dogs (16/36 stifles) and non-Boxer dogs (42/271 stifles), corresponding to an odds ratio of 5.8 (confidence interval: 1.96-17.02; p-value <0.001). Boxer dogs were more likely to undergo revision surgery and to develop multiple complications. The incidence of tibial tuberosity fractures requiring surgical repair (2/36 versus 1/271) and incisional infections requiring antibiotic treatment (three in each group) was significantly higher in the Boxer group.Boxer dogs had more major and multiple complications after TTA surgery than the control non-Boxer group; these complications included higher rates of revision surgery, tibial tuberosity fractures requiring stabilization, and infection related complications. The pertinence and value of breed-specific recommendations for cranial cruciate ligament disease appears to be a subject worthy of further investigation.


PubMed | Pride Veterinary Center
Type: | Journal: Veterinary and comparative oncology | Year: 2016

This study reports the clinical value of sentinel lymph node (SLN) mapping with indirect lymphography (IL) using iodized oil (IO) as a marker injected preoperatively around the site of the primary tumour and radiography or tomodensitometry for imaging. Surgical extirpation of the node was performed following peritumoural injection of methylene blue (MB). Twenty nine dogs affected by 30 palpable solid tumours were prospectively studied. SLNs were identified by IL in 96.6% of the IL studies. IL followed by MB studies were performed in 25 dogs (26 studies). In these studies, agreement between IL and MB was observed in 84.6%. One dog had a minor complication following IO injection. This protocol represents an attractive alternative to scintigraphy for SLN mapping. This less technically demanding protocol may provide a wider access to SLN identification for application in veterinary oncology.

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