Preventive Medicine Research Institute

Sausalito, CA, United States

Preventive Medicine Research Institute

Sausalito, CA, United States
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Techonomy Returns to New York for Two Days of Intense Conversation About Technology’s Impact on Business and Society Techonomy, a leading events and media company focused on helping organizations and executives prepare for the rapid pace of tech-enabled transformation, will hold two consecutive events, Techonomy Health & Techonomy NYC, in New York City on May 16th & 17th. Techonomy, a leading events and media company focused on helping organizations and executives prepare for the rapid pace of tech-enabled transformation, will hold two consecutive events, Techonomy Health & Techonomy NYC, in New York City on May 16th & 17th. “We love our home city in New York and we love helping leaders engage with ideas about tech-driven change, so we are especially proud to be doing that here for the second year in a row,” said David Kirkpatrick, CEO and Chief Techonomist and author of the bestselling book, The Facebook Effect: The Inside Story of the Company that is Connecting the World. "We're inviting techonomic thinkers to join us for either one or both of two days – Techonomy Health first, and then Techonomy NYC on May 17." Techonomy Health explores the vast potential tech holds to remake this $3 trillion U.S. industry. The program includes healthcare experts, technologists, policy makers and entrepreneurs for a high-energy discussion around topics including how AI and CRISPR will change the war on cancer, the future of consumer health information and media, the ethical and moral quandaries of enhancing the human genome, and what Trumpcare and Obamacare mean for health innovation. Speakers include Len Greer, President, Johnson & Johnson Health and Wellness; Meredith Guerriero, director for the healthcare industry at Facebook; Arianna Huffington, Founder and CEO, Thrive Global; John Mattison, Chief Medical Information Officer, Kaiser Permanente; celebrated author and holistic medicine expert Dean Ornish; Claudia González Romo, Executive Office of the Secretary General, UNICEF; Oscar CEO Mario Schlosser; Brent Shafer, CEO of Philips North America; and Steven Zatz, CEO of WebMD. (Full list below.) The following day, Techonomy NYC will be a New York-style version of Techonomy’s longstanding retreat in California, where last fall Mark Zuckerberg famously spoke about fake news. Techonomy NYC will ignite invigorating discourse around ongoing challenges relating to what a government led by Trump means for technology; the future of work in an on-demand gig economy; the digital and social fight against terrorism; and tough-to-answer questions about decision making power in an AI world, among many other topics. Speakers include Beth Comstock, Vice Chair of GE; Karin Klein, Head of Investing Activities at VC firm Bloomberg Beta; Environmental Defense Fund President Fred Krupp; Turner CEO John Martin; Miguel McKelvey, Co-founder and Chief Creative Officer of WeWork; Eli Pariser, Co-founder and Co-CEO of Upworthy; and General Assembly CEO Jake Schwartz. (Full list below.) Techonomy's partners for the conferences include Accenture, Celestica, Cognizant, Johnson & Johnson, Paypal, Philips, Pitney-Bowes, and Turner Broadcasting. Techonomy Health confirmed speakers include: Yonatan Adiri, Founder and CEO, Healthy.io and Founder, DisruptionLabs; Agnes Binagwaho Vice Chancellor, University of Global Health Equity; Jef Boeke, Director of the Institute for Systems Genetics, NYU Langone Medical Center; Walter De Brouwer, Founder and CEO, doc.ai; Brian Donley, Chief of Staff, Cleveland Clinic; David Ewing Duncan, Co-Founder, Curator and CEO, Arc Fusion; Esther Dyson, Chairman, EDventure Holdings; Katelyn Gleason, CEO & Cofounder, Eligible; Claudia González Romo, Executive Office of the Secretary General, UNICEF; Len Greer, President, Johnson & Johnson Health and Wellness Solutions; Meredith Guerriero, director for the healthcare industry at Facebook Ron Gutman, Founder and CEO, HealthTap; Jill Hagenkord, Chief Medical Officer, Color Genomics; Arianna Huffington, Founder and CEO, Thrive Global; Nancy J. Kelley, President and CEO, Nancy J. Kelley & Associates and Former Founding Executive Director, New York Genome Center; Robert Klitzman, Director, Masters of Bioethics Program, Joseph Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University; Tom Kottler, CEO, Co-Founder, HealthPrize Technologies; Steven Krein, Co-founder and CEO, StartUp Health; Andrew Kung, Chair and Professor, Department of Pediatrics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center; Kristin Lemkau, Chief Marketing Officer, JPMorgan Chase; Christian Madsbjerg, Senior Partner, ReD Associates; John Mattison, Chief Medical Information Officer, Kaiser Permanente; Dan Munro, Author; Alexi Nazem, Co-founder and CEO, Nomad Health; Lynn O'Connor Vos, Chief Executive Officer, Grey Healthcare Group (ghg); Dean Ornish, President and Director, Preventive Medicine Research Institute; Meredith Salisbury, Editorial Director, Bioscribe; Mario Schlosser, Co-founder and CEO, Oscar; Brent Shafer, CEO, Philips North America; Seth Sternberg, Co-founder and CEO, Honor; Andrew Thompson, Co-founder and CEO, Proteus Digital Health, Inc.; and Steven Zatz, CEO, WebMD. Current agenda and additional information can be found at www.techonomy.com/health Techonomy NYC confirmed speakers include: Daniel Buchner, Senior PM - Head of Decentralized Identity at Microsoft, Microsoft; Beth Comstock, Vice Chair, GE; Meltem Demirors, Director, Development, Digital Currency Group; Diana Farrell, President and CEO, JPMorgan Chase Institute; Max Furmanov, Managing Director & Partner, Accenture; Andrea Glorioso, Counsellor, Digital Economy / Cyber, Delegation of the European Union to the USA; COL John Graham, Associate Dean for Research and Chief Scientist, United States Military Academy; Subramaniam Hariharan, VP Global Quality, Technology Innovation & Operational Excellence, Celestica; Jessi Hempel, Head of Editorial, Backchannel; Karin Klein, Head of Investing Activities, Bloomberg Beta; Fred Krupp, President, Environmental Defense Fund; Doreen Lorenzo, Co-founder, Vidlet Inc.; Director for the Center of Integrated Design, The University of Texas; Rachel Maguire, Research Director, Health Horizons Program, Institute for the Future; Gary Marcus, Professor, NYU; Founder, Geometric Intelligence (acquired by Uber); John Martin, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Turner; Miguel McKelvey, Co-founder and Chief Creative Officer, WeWork; Gregory McNeal, Co-Founder, AirMap; John Melkon, Center for the Study of Civil-Military Operations, United States Military Academy; Michael Monahan, Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, Pitney Bowes; Eli Pariser, Co-founder and Co-CEO, Upworthy; Bre Pettis, Founder, Bre & Co.; Ernesto Quinteros, Chief Design Officer, Johnson & Johnson; Andrew Rasiej, Founder and Publisher, Personal Democracy Forum; Founder and CEO, Civic Hall; Slava Rubin, Chief Business Officer, Indiegogo; Julie Samuels, Executive Director, Tech:NYC; Jake Schwartz, Co-founder and CEO, General Assembly; Melanie Shapiro, Founder and CEO, Case; Oz Sultan, CEO, Sultan Interactive Group; Arun Sundararajan, Professor of Business, New York University; Author, "The Sharing Economy"; David Treat, Managing Director, Accenture; Bradley Tusk, Founder and CEO, Tusk Ventures; Michael J. Wolf, Co-founder and Managing Director, Activate, Inc.; and Tracy Young, CEO and Co-founder, PlanGrid. Current agenda and additional information can be found at www.techonomy.com/nyc Contacts: Techonomy Josh Kampel 617.233.7722 josh@techonomy.com Grayling Crystal Yang 415.593.1188 techonomy@grayling.com New York, NY, April 25, 2017 --( PR.com )-- GE’s Beth Comstock, Arianna Huffington of Thrive Global, and John Martin of Turner are among 60 speakers dissecting the role of tech on social and economic progress, and especially in health.Techonomy, a leading events and media company focused on helping organizations and executives prepare for the rapid pace of tech-enabled transformation, will hold two consecutive events, Techonomy Health & Techonomy NYC, in New York City on May 16th & 17th.“We love our home city in New York and we love helping leaders engage with ideas about tech-driven change, so we are especially proud to be doing that here for the second year in a row,” said David Kirkpatrick, CEO and Chief Techonomist and author of the bestselling book, The Facebook Effect: The Inside Story of the Company that is Connecting the World. "We're inviting techonomic thinkers to join us for either one or both of two days – Techonomy Health first, and then Techonomy NYC on May 17."Techonomy Health explores the vast potential tech holds to remake this $3 trillion U.S. industry. The program includes healthcare experts, technologists, policy makers and entrepreneurs for a high-energy discussion around topics including how AI and CRISPR will change the war on cancer, the future of consumer health information and media, the ethical and moral quandaries of enhancing the human genome, and what Trumpcare and Obamacare mean for health innovation. Speakers include Len Greer, President, Johnson & Johnson Health and Wellness; Meredith Guerriero, director for the healthcare industry at Facebook; Arianna Huffington, Founder and CEO, Thrive Global; John Mattison, Chief Medical Information Officer, Kaiser Permanente; celebrated author and holistic medicine expert Dean Ornish; Claudia González Romo, Executive Office of the Secretary General, UNICEF; Oscar CEO Mario Schlosser; Brent Shafer, CEO of Philips North America; and Steven Zatz, CEO of WebMD. (Full list below.)The following day, Techonomy NYC will be a New York-style version of Techonomy’s longstanding retreat in California, where last fall Mark Zuckerberg famously spoke about fake news. Techonomy NYC will ignite invigorating discourse around ongoing challenges relating to what a government led by Trump means for technology; the future of work in an on-demand gig economy; the digital and social fight against terrorism; and tough-to-answer questions about decision making power in an AI world, among many other topics. Speakers include Beth Comstock, Vice Chair of GE; Karin Klein, Head of Investing Activities at VC firm Bloomberg Beta; Environmental Defense Fund President Fred Krupp; Turner CEO John Martin; Miguel McKelvey, Co-founder and Chief Creative Officer of WeWork; Eli Pariser, Co-founder and Co-CEO of Upworthy; and General Assembly CEO Jake Schwartz. (Full list below.)Techonomy's partners for the conferences include Accenture, Celestica, Cognizant, Johnson & Johnson, Paypal, Philips, Pitney-Bowes, and Turner Broadcasting.Techonomy Health confirmed speakers include:Yonatan Adiri, Founder and CEO, Healthy.io and Founder, DisruptionLabs; Agnes Binagwaho Vice Chancellor, University of Global Health Equity; Jef Boeke, Director of the Institute for Systems Genetics, NYU Langone Medical Center; Walter De Brouwer, Founder and CEO, doc.ai; Brian Donley, Chief of Staff, Cleveland Clinic; David Ewing Duncan, Co-Founder, Curator and CEO, Arc Fusion; Esther Dyson, Chairman, EDventure Holdings; Katelyn Gleason, CEO & Cofounder, Eligible; Claudia González Romo, Executive Office of the Secretary General, UNICEF; Len Greer, President, Johnson & Johnson Health and Wellness Solutions; Meredith Guerriero, director for the healthcare industry at Facebook Ron Gutman, Founder and CEO, HealthTap; Jill Hagenkord, Chief Medical Officer, Color Genomics; Arianna Huffington, Founder and CEO, Thrive Global; Nancy J. Kelley, President and CEO, Nancy J. Kelley & Associates and Former Founding Executive Director, New York Genome Center; Robert Klitzman, Director, Masters of Bioethics Program, Joseph Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University; Tom Kottler, CEO, Co-Founder, HealthPrize Technologies; Steven Krein, Co-founder and CEO, StartUp Health; Andrew Kung, Chair and Professor, Department of Pediatrics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center; Kristin Lemkau, Chief Marketing Officer, JPMorgan Chase; Christian Madsbjerg, Senior Partner, ReD Associates; John Mattison, Chief Medical Information Officer, Kaiser Permanente; Dan Munro, Author; Alexi Nazem, Co-founder and CEO, Nomad Health; Lynn O'Connor Vos, Chief Executive Officer, Grey Healthcare Group (ghg); Dean Ornish, President and Director, Preventive Medicine Research Institute; Meredith Salisbury, Editorial Director, Bioscribe; Mario Schlosser, Co-founder and CEO, Oscar; Brent Shafer, CEO, Philips North America; Seth Sternberg, Co-founder and CEO, Honor; Andrew Thompson, Co-founder and CEO, Proteus Digital Health, Inc.; and Steven Zatz, CEO, WebMD.Current agenda and additional information can be found at www.techonomy.com/healthTechonomy NYC confirmed speakers include:Daniel Buchner, Senior PM - Head of Decentralized Identity at Microsoft, Microsoft; Beth Comstock, Vice Chair, GE; Meltem Demirors, Director, Development, Digital Currency Group; Diana Farrell, President and CEO, JPMorgan Chase Institute; Max Furmanov, Managing Director & Partner, Accenture; Andrea Glorioso, Counsellor, Digital Economy / Cyber, Delegation of the European Union to the USA; COL John Graham, Associate Dean for Research and Chief Scientist, United States Military Academy; Subramaniam Hariharan, VP Global Quality, Technology Innovation & Operational Excellence, Celestica; Jessi Hempel, Head of Editorial, Backchannel; Karin Klein, Head of Investing Activities, Bloomberg Beta; Fred Krupp, President, Environmental Defense Fund; Doreen Lorenzo, Co-founder, Vidlet Inc.; Director for the Center of Integrated Design, The University of Texas; Rachel Maguire, Research Director, Health Horizons Program, Institute for the Future; Gary Marcus, Professor, NYU; Founder, Geometric Intelligence (acquired by Uber); John Martin, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Turner; Miguel McKelvey, Co-founder and Chief Creative Officer, WeWork; Gregory McNeal, Co-Founder, AirMap; John Melkon, Center for the Study of Civil-Military Operations, United States Military Academy; Michael Monahan, Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, Pitney Bowes; Eli Pariser, Co-founder and Co-CEO, Upworthy; Bre Pettis, Founder, Bre & Co.; Ernesto Quinteros, Chief Design Officer, Johnson & Johnson; Andrew Rasiej, Founder and Publisher, Personal Democracy Forum; Founder and CEO, Civic Hall; Slava Rubin, Chief Business Officer, Indiegogo; Julie Samuels, Executive Director, Tech:NYC; Jake Schwartz, Co-founder and CEO, General Assembly; Melanie Shapiro, Founder and CEO, Case; Oz Sultan, CEO, Sultan Interactive Group; Arun Sundararajan, Professor of Business, New York University; Author, "The Sharing Economy"; David Treat, Managing Director, Accenture; Bradley Tusk, Founder and CEO, Tusk Ventures; Michael J. Wolf, Co-founder and Managing Director, Activate, Inc.; and Tracy Young, CEO and Co-founder, PlanGrid.Current agenda and additional information can be found at www.techonomy.com/nycContacts:TechonomyJosh Kampel617.233.7722josh@techonomy.comGraylingCrystal Yang415.593.1188techonomy@grayling.com


Freeman A.M.,National Jewish Health | Morris P.B.,Medical University of South Carolina | Barnard N.,George Washington University | Esselstyn C.B.,Cleveland Clinic | And 9 more authors.
Journal of the American College of Cardiology | Year: 2017

The potential cardiovascular benefits of several trending foods and dietary patterns are still incompletely understood, and nutritional science continues to evolve. However, in the meantime, a number of controversial dietary patterns, foods, and nutrients have received significant media exposure and are mired by hype. This review addresses some of the more popular foods and dietary patterns that are promoted for cardiovascular health to provide clinicians with accurate information for patient discussions in the clinical setting. © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation


Ornish D.,University of California at San Francisco | Ornish D.,Preventive Medicine Research Institute | Lin J.,University of California at San Francisco | Chan J.M.,University of California at San Francisco | And 12 more authors.
The Lancet Oncology | Year: 2013

Background: Telomere shortness in human beings is a prognostic marker of ageing, disease, and premature morbidity. We previously found an association between 3 months of comprehensive lifestyle changes and increased telomerase activity in human immune-system cells. We followed up participants to investigate long-term effects. Methods: This follow-up study compared ten men and 25 external controls who had biopsy-proven low-risk prostate cancer and had chosen to undergo active surveillance. Eligible participants were enrolled between 2003 and 2007 from previous studies and selected according to the same criteria. Men in the intervention group followed a programme of comprehensive lifestyle changes (diet, activity, stress management, and social support), and the men in the control group underwent active surveillance alone. We took blood samples at 5 years and compared relative telomere length and telomerase enzymatic activity per viable cell with those at baseline, and assessed their relation to the degree of lifestyle changes. Findings: Relative telomere length increased from baseline by a median of 0·06 telomere to single-copy gene ratio (T/S)units (IQR-0·05 to 0·11) in the lifestyle intervention group, but decreased in the control group (-0·03 T/S units, -0·05 to 0·03, difference p=0·03). When data from the two groups were combined, adherence to lifestyle changes was significantly associated with relative telomere length after adjustment for age and the length of follow-up (for each percentage point increase in lifestyle adherence score, T/S units increased by 0·07, 95% CI 0·02-0·12, p=0·005). At 5 years, telomerase activity had decreased from baseline by 0·25 (-2·25 to 2·23) units in the lifestyle intervention group, and by 1·08 (-3·25 to 1·86) units in the control group (p=0·64), and was not associated with adherence to lifestyle changes (relative risk 0·93, 95% CI 0·72-1·20, p=0·57). Interpretation: Our comprehensive lifestyle intervention was associated with increases in relative telomere length after 5 years of follow-up, compared with controls, in this small pilot study. Larger randomised controlled trials are warranted to confirm this finding. Funding: US Department of Defense, NIH/NCI, Furlotti Family Foundation, Bahna Foundation, DeJoria Foundation, Walton Family Foundation, Resnick Foundation, Greenbaum Foundation, Natwin Foundation, Safeway Foundation, Prostate Cancer Foundation. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.


Chainani-Wu N.,Preventive Medicine Research Institute | Chainani-Wu N.,University of California at San Francisco | Weidner G.,Preventive Medicine Research Institute | Weidner G.,San Francisco State University | And 8 more authors.
American Journal of Cardiology | Year: 2010

Cross-sectional studies have reported inverse associations of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) with the body mass index (BMI). We evaluated whether changes in the BMI are associated with changes in BNP. A nested prospective cohort study of a lifestyle intervention (low-fat, whole-foods diet, exercise, stress management, and social support) was conducted. BNP, BMI, and other biomarkers were measured at baseline and 3 months. A total of 131 subjects, 56 with coronary heart disease (CHD) and 75 at high risk, with ≥3 CHD risk factors and/or diabetes mellitus, were enrolled. At 3 months, the mean BMI had decreased (34.4 to 31.7 kg/m2, p <0.001), BNP had increased (median 18 to 28 pg/ml, p <0.001), and low-density lipoprotein, C-reactive protein, apolipoprotein B (all p <0.002), and angina frequency (p = 0.017) and severity (p = 0.052) had decreased. The subjects' physical limitations had decreased and their physical functioning had improved (all p <0.001). The percentage of change in BNP was inversely associated with the percentage of change in insulin (r = -0.339, p = 0.005, n = 63 nondiabetics). It was also inversely associated with the percentage of change in BMI (r = -0.28, p = 0.002, n = 116), and this association remained significant (p = 0.029) in multiple regression analyses controlling for age, gender, CHD, diabetes mellitus, percentage of change in lifestyle index, and β-blocker use. The metabolic changes related to adipose tissue lipolysis could explain these findings. In conclusion, BNP increased in subjects experiencing weight loss while following a lifestyle intervention, and angina pectoris, physical limitations, and other CHD risk factors decreased. Therefore, in this context, increasing BNP might not indicate worsening disease or a worsening prognosis. Thus, the proposed use of BNP in monitoring disease progression should take into account changes in the BMI during the same period. © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.


Chainani-Wu N.,Preventive Medicine Research Institute | Chainani-Wu N.,University of California at San Francisco | Weidner G.,San Francisco State University | Purnell D.M.,Preventive Medicine Research Institute | And 11 more authors.
American Journal of Cardiology | Year: 2011

The present study evaluated the changes in emerging cardiac biomarkers, cognitive function, and social support measures after a comprehensive lifestyle intervention that included a low-fat, whole-foods, plant-based diet, exercise, stress management, and group support meetings. We conducted a prospective cohort study of 131 participants (59.2% women and 43.1% with diabetes mellitus), 56 with coronary heart disease (CHD) (37.5% women and 27.3% diabetes mellitus), and 75 at high risk with ≥3 CHD risk factors and/or diabetes mellitus (76% women and 54.7% diabetes mellitus). The measurements were taken at baseline and 3 months after the intervention. Improvement in all targeted health behaviors was seen in both high-risk and CHD groups (all p <0.001) at 3 months, with reductions in body mass index, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, waist/hip ratio, C-reactive protein, insulin, low-density lipoprotein, high-density and total cholesterol, apolipoproteins A1 and B (all p <0.009) were observed. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy analysis of lipoprotein subclass particle concentrations and diameters showed a reduction in large very-low-density lipoprotein particles, size of the very-low-density lipoprotein particles, total low-density lipoprotein particles; total, large, and small high-density lipoprotein particles (all p <0.009) and small very-low-density lipoprotein particles (p <0.02). Increases in fibrinogen (p <0.03) and B-type natriuretic peptide (p <0.001) were seen, and these changes correlated inversely with the changes in the body mass index. The observed increase in B-type natriuretic peptide can be explained by the metabolic changes related to adipose tissue lipolysis. The quality of life, cognitive functioning, and social support measures significantly improved. In conclusion, lifestyle changes can be followed by favorable changes in traditional and emerging coronary heart disease biomarkers, quality of life, social support, and cognitive function among those with, or at high risk, of CHD. © 2011 Elsevier Inc.


Dod H.S.,West Virginia University | Bhardwaj R.,West Virginia University | Sajja V.,West Virginia University | Weidner G.,San Francisco State University | And 10 more authors.
American Journal of Cardiology | Year: 2010

Intensive lifestyle changes have been shown to regress atherosclerosis, improve cardiovascular risk profiles, and decrease angina pectoris and cardiac events. We evaluated the influence of the Multisite Cardiac Lifestyle Intervention Program, an ongoing health insurance-covered lifestyle intervention conducted at our site, on endothelial function and inflammatory markers of atherosclerosis in this pilot study. Twenty-seven participants with coronary artery disease (CAD) and/or risk factors for CAD (nonsmokers, 14 men; mean age 56 years) were enrolled in the experimental group and asked to make changes in diet (10% calories from fat, plant based), engage in moderate exercise (3 hours/week), and practice stress management (1 hour/day). Twenty historically (age, gender, CAD, and CAD risk factors) matched participants were enrolled in the control group with usual standard of care. At baseline endothelium-dependent brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) was performed in the 2 groups. Serum markers of inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, and angiogenesis were performed only in the experimental group. After 12 weeks, FMD had improved in the experimental group from a baseline of 4.23 ± 0.13 to 4.65 ± 0.15 mm, whereas in the control group it decreased from 4.62 ± 0.16 to 4.48 ± 0.17 mm. Changes were significantly different in favor of the experimental group (p <0.0001). Also, significant decreases occurred in C-reactive protein (from 2.07 ± 0.57 to 1.6 ± 0.43 mg/L, p = 0.03) and interleukin-6 (from 2.52 ± 0.62 to 1.23 ± 0.3 pg/ml, p = 0.02) after 12 weeks. Significant improvement in FMD, C-reactive protein, and interleukin-6 with intensive lifestyle changes in the experimental group suggests ≥1 potential mechanism underlying the clinical benefits seen in previous trials. © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.


Pischke C.R.,Dana-Farber Cancer Institute | Pischke C.R.,Bremen Institute for Prevention Research and Social Medicine | Elliott-Eller M.,Palm Drive Hospital | Li M.,State University of New York at Stony Brook | And 4 more authors.
Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing | Year: 2010

Background and Research Objective: It is unclear whether lifestyle changes can delay the need for surgical procedures in coronary heart disease (CHD) patients with asymptomatic reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). The aim of this pilot study was to examine whether lifestyle changes can delay the need for surgical procedures in this population. Subject and Methods: We compared 3-year clinical events in 27 CHD patients eligible to receive revascularization (by insurance standards), but underwent lifestyle changes (low-fat diet, exercise, stress management) instead (intervention group [IG], LVEF ≤40%), with those of a historically matched (age, gender, LVEF, and stenosis of the 3 major coronary arteries) control group receiving usual care (UCG; n = 13) who received revascularization at study entry. Both IG and UCG patients were enrolled in the health insurance companies participating in the Multicenter Lifestyle Demonstration Project, an insurance-sponsored, community-based, secondary prevention study implemented at 8 hospital sites in the United States. Results and Conclusion: At 3 months, there were more cardiac events in the UCG (6 events) than in the IG (1 event; P < .006; odds ratio = 13.27; confidence interval = 1.57-111.94). This difference was maintained over 3 years (P < .06; odds ratio = 2.75; confidence interval = 1.05-7.19). Of the 26 surviving (1 cardiac death) IG patients, 23 did not require primary revascularization. In conclusion, CHD patients with asymptomatic reduced LVEF may be able to safely delay revascularization by making changes in lifestyle with no increased risk for cardiac events or overt heart failure over 3 years. Copyright © 2010 Wolters Kluwer Health.


Pischke C.R.,Dana-Farber Cancer Institute | Frenda S.,Preventive Medicine Research Institute | Ornish D.,Preventive Medicine Research Institute | Weidner G.,San Francisco State University | Weidner G.,Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz
Psychology and Health | Year: 2010

This observational study investigates whether persons with elevated coronary risk factors (CRFs >3 and/or diabetes) and depression [i.e., ≥16 on the Center for Epidemiological Scale - Depression (CES-D)] can make changes in health behaviours over 3 months and improve depressive symptoms and other CRFs. Analyses were based on data from 310 men and 687 women enrolled in the high-risk arm of the Multisite Cardiac Lifestyle Intervention Program, targeting diet (10% fat), exercise (3 h per week) and stress management (7 h per week). As expected, at study entry, depressed persons had a more adverse medical status, consumed more dietary fat and practiced less stress management than non-depressed persons. To examine 3-month changes, participants were grouped into (1) depressed persons who became non-depressed (CES-D ≤ 16, n = 248; 73%), (2) persons who remained or became depressed (CES-D >16, n = 76) and (3) non-depressed persons who remained non-depressed (n = 597). All persons, regardless of group, met program goals. The greatest improvements (i.e., diet, exercise, perceived stress, hostility and mental health) were observed in Group 1 relative to Groups 2 and 3, which did not differ from each other. Comprehensive lifestyle changes appear to be feasible and beneficial for initially depressed persons with elevated CRFs. © Taylor & Francis.


Silberman A.,Preventive Medicine Research Institute | Banthia R.,Preventive Medicine Research Institute | Estay I.S.,Preventive Medicine Research Institute | Kemp C.,Preventive Medicine Research Institute | And 3 more authors.
American Journal of Health Promotion | Year: 2010

Purpose. The purpose of this study is to test the efficacy and effectiveness of an intensive cardiac rehabilitation program in improving health outcomes in multiple sites. Methods. This study employs a nonexperimental (prospective time series) design to investigate changes in cardiovascular disease in 2974 men and women from 24 socioeconomically diverse sites who participated in an intensive cardiac rehabilitation program at baseline, 12 weeks, and 1 year. Paired t-tests were used to assess differences by comparing baseline values to those after 12 weeks, baseline values to those after 1 year, and values after 12 weeks to those after 1 year. Results. Eighty-eight percent of patients remained enrolled in the program after 12 weeks, and 78.1% remained enrolled in the program after 1 year. Patients showed statistically significant improvements after 12 weeks in body mass index (BMI), triglycerides, lmu density lipoprotein cholesterol, total cholesterol, hemoglobin AIc, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, depression, hostility, exercise, and functional capacity. These differences also remained significant after 1 year. There iuas additional significant improvement between 12 weeks and 1 year only in BMI, high density lipofrrotein cholesterol, functional capacity, and hostility, and significant recidivistu between 12 weeks and 1 year in all other measures (except triglycerides) and depression, yet improvements from baseline to 1 year remained significant in all measures (except HDL, xvhich was unchanged) (p < .005). Conclusions. This intensive cardiac rehabilitation program ivas feasible and sustainable for most patients who enrolled and was associated with numerous subjective and objedive improvements in health outcomes. It demonstrates that the intervention works when it is administered by staff at multiple clinical/community sites in four different states. These improvements were also seen in patients 65 years of age or older. (Am I Health lhomot 2010:24[41:260-266.) Copyright © 2010 by American Journal of Health Promotion, Inc.

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