Prevention Center

Chicago, IL, United States

Prevention Center

Chicago, IL, United States
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News Article | May 8, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

MINNEAPOLIS, May 08, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Starkey® Hearing Technologies is proud to once again be the presenting sponsor for PACER Center’s Annual Benefit on May 13 at the Minneapolis Convention Center. PACER’s Annual Benefit will be hosted by famed comedian and former “The Tonight Show” host Jay Leno. The evening will feature a silent acution, live auction and benefit performance, with proceeds going towards PACER’s various programs. “We are delighted to again have Starkey Hearing Technologies’ wonderful support for PACER’s Annual Benefit this year,” said Paula Goldberg, PACER Center executive director. “As a company that supports better hearing for people around the globe, Starkey shares our desire to improve the lives of others, including children with disabilities. We value our relationship with Starkey, a true champion for children and adults who are deaf or hard of hearing.” Established in 1977, PACER Center was created by parents of children and young adults with disabilities to help enhance the quality of life and expand opportunities for children and young adults with disabilities and their families. PACER programs around the country provide familes, parents, and professionals with key resources, information and materials to help children and youth with disabilities lead fuller, richer lives. “PACER Center’s programs and Paula Goldberg’s vision are near and dear to our hearts,” said Tani Austin, Starkey Hearing Technologies chief philanthropy officer. “Just as we do at Starkey, PACER is working every day to help families around the world find happiness and empowerment through opportunity and education. We are proud to once again be part of PACER’s special night and to support such an impactfulorganization.” Learn more about PACER Center’s Annual Benefit at www.pacer.org/benefit. Starkey Hearing Technologies is a privately held, global hearing technology company headquartered in Eden Prairie, Minnesota. Founded in 1967, the company is recognized for its innovative design, development and distribution of comprehensive digital hearing systems. The company develops, manufactures and distributes hearing aids via three distinct brands – Audibel, NuEar and its original brand, Starkey. As the only American owned and operated provider of hearing technologies, Starkey Hearing Technologies is proud to support veterans and active military service personnel with the best in American innovation, including a suite of revolutionary hearing technologies and other resources. Starkey Hearing Technologies currently employs more than 4,800 people and operates 21 facilities and conducts business in more than 100 markets worldwide. For more information, visit www.starkey.com. About PACER PACER Center enhances the quality of life and expands opportunities for children, youth, and young adults with all disabilities and their families so each person can reach his or her highest potential. PACER operates on the principles of parents helping parents, supporting families, promoting a safe environment for all children, and working in collaboration with others. Founded in 2006, PACER’s National Bullying Prevention Center actively leads social change, so that bullying is no longer considered an accepted childhood rite of passage. Learn more at PACER.org. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/ebc25227-3b46-497e-939a-aafe35264002


Educator, Kelly Ann Guglietti Reveals the Antidote to Bullying in a Speaking Tour While current anti-bullying programs define what bullying is and encourage students to “tell a grown-up” when they have been bullied, most do not offer any proactive methods to prevent bullying. Operating under the research done by PACER’s National Bullying Prevention Center profiling the bullied as those appearing most weak and vulnerable, Kelly Ann offers a literature-based anti-bullying program to bully-proof all children in the pursuit of building a generation of non-bullies. Knowing that bullies act out because of their own vulnerabilities, Kelly Ann’s program serendipitously addresses those as well. Would it not be great to someday be able to explain to children what bullying was, in the same manner we explain what segregation or any other historical concept was? Kelly Ann’s first book, “The Green Tom” illustrates the silliness of jealousy. Her second book, “The Yellow Sea Lioness” encourages children to discover their own talents and not to judge themselves by the talents of others. Her third book, “The Orange Chihuahua” teaches children that to know their true worth they must be their true selves. A fourth book will complete the anti-bullying series by unraveling the make up of a bully, revealing the effects of bullying on the esteem of others and showing that cooler heads win out in the end. Multi-leveled activity pages are at the end of each book to actively engage children in reflection of their own experiences with each moral. Kelly Ann is starting a speaking seminar titled, “The Antidote to Bullying: Character Education” for combined districts of elementary school counselors, school superintendents and administrators, curriculum advisors, parent and regional scouting organizations, religious conferences and anti-bullying sponsors. For details on how to schedule a seminar, please go to the “News and Events” page of her website listed below. San Antonio, FL, April 20, 2017 --( PR.com )-- Kelly Ann Guglietti is an elementary educator in Pasco County, Florida. Through nearly ten years in public education throughout the tri-county Tampa Bay Area, she has sat in on many elementary school anti-bullying campaigns and wondered why bullying is still prevalent in today’s elementary school campuses.While current anti-bullying programs define what bullying is and encourage students to “tell a grown-up” when they have been bullied, most do not offer any proactive methods to prevent bullying.Operating under the research done by PACER’s National Bullying Prevention Center profiling the bullied as those appearing most weak and vulnerable, Kelly Ann offers a literature-based anti-bullying program to bully-proof all children in the pursuit of building a generation of non-bullies. Knowing that bullies act out because of their own vulnerabilities, Kelly Ann’s program serendipitously addresses those as well. Would it not be great to someday be able to explain to children what bullying was, in the same manner we explain what segregation or any other historical concept was?Kelly Ann’s first book, “The Green Tom” illustrates the silliness of jealousy. Her second book, “The Yellow Sea Lioness” encourages children to discover their own talents and not to judge themselves by the talents of others. Her third book, “The Orange Chihuahua” teaches children that to know their true worth they must be their true selves. A fourth book will complete the anti-bullying series by unraveling the make up of a bully, revealing the effects of bullying on the esteem of others and showing that cooler heads win out in the end. Multi-leveled activity pages are at the end of each book to actively engage children in reflection of their own experiences with each moral.Kelly Ann is starting a speaking seminar titled, “The Antidote to Bullying: Character Education” for combined districts of elementary school counselors, school superintendents and administrators, curriculum advisors, parent and regional scouting organizations, religious conferences and anti-bullying sponsors. For details on how to schedule a seminar, please go to the “News and Events” page of her website listed below. Contest The first person to email in a correct guess as to the color and animal of Kelly Ann's next book will get a free, autographed copy of the book once it comes out. Please send name and mailing address through the "Contact" page on the author's website. Filename: 4thBookMystery.jpg Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from Kelly Ann Guglietti, Author


News Article | May 23, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Apex Learning, known for digital curriculum that makes rigorous, standards-based content accessible to all students, has been recognized by the National Dropout Prevention Center (NDPC) for having curriculum that demonstrates “Strong Evidence of Effectiveness.” The NDPC created the Model Programs Database, a searchable database of research-based programs to assist schools and other organizations in reviewing proven programs. The rating scale for the Model Programs Database is based on the evaluation of nationwide prevention, intervention and recovery programs. To meet the criteria for Strong Evidence of Effectiveness, the highest possible rating, the program must: According to the NDPC review, Apex Learning digital curriculum was used effectively in the following districts: “When selecting a digital curriculum partner, schools and districts can have confidence knowing that Apex Learning digital curriculum has been recognized by the National Dropout Prevention Center for having Strong Evidence of Effectiveness,” said Cheryl Vedoe, CEO, Apex Learning. “Apex Learning digital curriculum is proven to help districts increase graduation rates, decrease dropout rates, graduate more at-risk students on time and raise scores on state and national exams.” To view the full Apex Learning rating in the NDPC Model Database, visit: http://dropoutprevention.org/mpdb/web/program/194. About Apex Learning Schools and districts nationwide implement Apex Learning digital curriculum to personalize the learning experience and support success for all students—from those who are struggling to those capable of accelerating. Proven to increase outcomes, Apex Learning digital curriculum actively engages students in learning, with embedded supports and scaffolds to meet the needs of diverse learners. During the most recent school year, there have been over three million enrollments in Apex Learning Comprehensive Courses and Adaptive Tutorials. Headquartered in Seattle, Apex Learning is accredited by AdvancEd and its courses are approved for National Collegiate Athletic Association eligibility. For more information, visit http://www.apexlearning.com or call 1.800.453.1454.


News Article | November 5, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

A form of yoga, Trauma-Sensitive Yoga (TSY), innovated by David Emerson at the Trauma Center at the Justice Resource Institute, has been shown to help patients suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), as well as chronically traumatized individuals. This includes military veterans, as well as survivors of chronic abuse. Bessel A. van der Kolk et al. have shown that TSY significantly reduces the symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in patients with chronic, traditional treatment-resistant PTSD. TSY has its foundations in trauma theory, attachment theory, neuroscience, Hatha Yoga, and breathing practices, with an emphasis on the recognition of somatic and kinesthetic sensations. Based on Dr. van der Kolk’s findings and the yoga techniques prescribed by Emerson, Dr. Carlo-Casellas, who trained at the Kripalu Center for Yoga and Health, started offering TSY at his Stress Management & Prevention Center (SMPC). Supporting his approach to teaching TSY is the fact that he also trained in Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (mindfulness in medicine) at the Center for Mindfulness established by Jon Kabat-Zinn, Ph.D., at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. Further to that, he has received training in mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) (Zindel V. Segal, et al.) as an adjunct therapy for preventing relapse in patients suffering with depression, specifically patients with major depressive disorders. TSY bears much in common with the contemplative practices, such as mindfulness meditation, where the focus is on the cultivation of perception of any sensation, including thoughts, emotions, sounds, visualizations, as well as somatic and kinesthetic sensations. In TSY, however, we limit ourselves exclusively to interoception—the perception of somatic and kinesthetic sensation only, not emotions or the interpretation of emotions such as mood, anger, sense of well-being, anxiety, or being sexually aroused. In TSY, the body, not the mind, is the center of attention. This is so because per Dr. Bessel van der Kolk, in his seminal work, The Body Keeps the Score, has shown that traumatized patients suffer from depersonalization—the outward manifestation of the biological freeze reaction, the characteristic blank stares and absent minds. These patients, instead of struggling to escape, they dissociate from their negative emotions and their bodies and lose their ability to perceive somatic and kinesthetic sensations. This sort of immobilization, generated in the reptilian brain, characterizes most chronically traumatized persons. For the teacher of TSY, the most important thing to do is use interoceptive words. That is, wording that invites the client to notice a somatic or kinesthetic sensation. For example, the patient is invited to “if you like, you may tilt your head downward, and as you so you may notice a sensation in the back of your neck or if you like, notice what you feel as you lift your head back up.” In addition to teaching TSY, Dr. Carlo-Casellas teaches other forms of life-long stress reduction modalities. He teaches mindfulness meditation, Yoga Nidra (the goal of which is to induce deep relaxation while comparing a positive and a negative event experienced in the past), hatha yoga, and restorative yoga. Restorative yoga is a type of gentle practice that uses bolsters, blankets, and other props to support the body, making it possible for the client to hold a posture for a longer period. Restorative yoga helps reduce stress and anxiety, increase energy, and improve physical and emotional well-being. It is particularly beneficial to clients suffering with chronic, inescapable stress, as well as those recovering from surgery, heart disease, cancer, and other stress related conditions. Those who have availed themselves of the services at the SMPC report that the yoga classes are very different from other yoga classes they have attended—the cues are different. But what makes the classes special are Dr. Carlo-Casellas’s soothing voice, gentle manner, his knowledge of the neurophysiology of how yoga modulates the structure and function of the brain, and the freedom he allows for the modification of the postures to fit the students’ needs, allowing him/her to experience the full effects of the practice to a maximum. Jaime Carlo-Casellas, Ph.D., is the Founding Director of the Stress Management & Prevention Center in Rancho Mirage, California. His reason for founding the Center was to help those who suffer from psychological and physical conditions, who feel depressed, and who are stuck and do not know which way to turn. To this end, he works closely with physicians and therapists who treat stress-related disorders. He can be reached by phone (760-464-2150) or email (casellas(at)stressprevention(dot)org). The SMPC is located at 69550 Highway 111, Suite 204, Rancho Mirage, CA 92270. Please see our Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/StressPrevention/ Please see our LinkedIn page: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jaime-aka-kabir-casellas-ph-d-50a01a9?trk=nav_responsive_tab_profile_pic


News Article | February 27, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Head Sensei (Instructor) Ian Vosper says, “Judo is the best martial art for the blind and visually impaired.” He speaks with authority having worked with the blind and visually impaired before opening the Rock Hill Judo Academy in 2015. Ian continues saying, “Judo is a positive and productive art for the blind.” Today, bullying issues continue to plague our society 2 - 3 times more to individuals with disabilities like low vision or blindness. Sensei Ian does not advocate physical aggression when competent in Judo but to be able to confront the bully and disarm the situation of this unfortunate epidemic facing society today. There is zero tolerance for bullying whether on the tatami (Judo mat) or off. Rock Hill Judo Academy and the Blind Judo Foundation are recognized by PACER’s National Bullying Prevention Center as a Champion Against Bullying. Judo is about touch, feeling and motion which makes it an ideal sport for the blind and visually impaired. In the Paralympics, a visually impaired Judoka (Judo athlete) competes against another visually impaired Judoka. However, in most non-Paralympic Judo events, a sighted person is the competition. Many who are not familiar with blind Judo question the pairing of a sighted person against the visually impaired until they see the results. Judo training reaches beyond the sport of Judo by infiltrating the very fiber of the student. Most Judoka and loved ones will report better school grades; relationship with parents and peers; opportunity for employment and becoming a productive person of the community. Being a champion on the Judo mat translates to being a champion off the mat. In the LightHouse News Winter 2017 Letter of the San Francisco LightHouse for the Blind and Visually Impaired, reports that 60% - 70% of legally blind people remain unemployed. Rigorous and enthusiastic support by family, friends, donors, foundations and grants are making a difference. Here is where Judo becomes the catalyst for building confidence, character, compassion, making commitments, humility, respect and responsibility. There’s not much a blind person can’t do if given the tools and opportunity. Judo is one such “tool.” Check out Rock Hill Judo Academy and their outstanding staff of seasoned Instructors and their empathy to empower and enhance the blind and visually impaired through the sport of Judo. The Blind Judo Foundation is a nonprofit 501(c) (3) organization who introduces and trains blind and visually impaired children, young adults and our returning blind and visually impaired military men and women in the sport of Judo. Supporting our blind athletes to train, travel, attend camps and compete relies upon your tax-exempt donations. All members of the Blind Judo Foundation are volunteers. A select few of our elite athletes go on to represent the USA as members of the US Paralympic (not to be confused with Special Olympics) Judo Team. More about the Foundation can be seen on our Facebook page. Ron C. Peck can be contacted at roncpeck(at)blindjudofoundation(dot)org or 1-425-444-8256 or Coach Willy Cahill at 1-650-589-0724


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The Blind Judo Foundation's Co-Founder and Head Coach of Cahill’s Judo Academy has a history of producing champions in the sport of Judo. Many of his current and former students (Judoka) can be found through out the US and many foreign countries. With a history of working with disabilities including the blind and visually impaired has brought Head Sensei, Ian Vosper of Rock Hill Judo Academy (Dojo) to the forefront in becoming a recognized Affiliate of the Blind Judo Foundation. Familiarity with blind Judo is not only a community asset but an opportunity for introducing and training the blind and visually impaired in the ancient sport of Judo. Sensei Ian started Judo at the early age of 9 in Devon, England and has had Judo in his blood ever since. He was introduced to and trained blind children in the sport of Judo. It was a natural for the newly formed Rock Hill Judo Academy, in Rock Hill, SC to incorporate those earlier skills being taught by the legendary Coach Willy Cahill of the Blind Judo Foundation and Sensei Ian himself. The Rock Hill Judo Academy is fortunate to also have Sensei Mary Krug Lozner, an Instructor and Member of the Academy staff. Sensei Mary was the first American to win a Gold Medal in an International Judo competition at the British Open in London. Having this type of talent and experience will greatly benefit all those who come before her dedicated to studying and learning the ancient sport of Judo. Sensei Norm Cleva another Instructor at the Rock Hill Judo Academy has been practicing Judo since 1960 representing the Navy Marine Team at the 1964 Olympic Trials. He is a two-time 1986 and 1992 National Judo Champion in the Masters Division. Since Sensei Norm discovered the Rock Hill Judo Academy, he has been able to bring his years of experience to the students (Judoka) of the Academy. The life enhancing skills of Judo goes beyond the color of one’s belt. Judo is about building confidence, compassion, character, commitments, humility, respect and responsibility. It is also a great defense against the domestic and international epidemic of bullying. The Blind Judo Foundation and Rock Hill Judo Academy have a zero tolerance for bullying whether on the mat or off and are recognized by PACER's National Bullying Prevention Center as Champions Against Bullying. Judo training is not intended to bring harm to a bully but to confront the epidemic. About us: The Blind Judo Foundation is a nonprofit 501(c) (3) organization who introduces and trains blind and visually impaired children, young adults and our returning blind and visually impaired military men and women in the sport of Judo. Supporting our blind athletes to train, travel, attend camps and compete relies upon your tax-exempt donations. All members of the Blind Judo Foundation are volunteers. A select few of our elite athletes go on to represent the USA as members of the US Paralympic (not to be confused with Special Olympics) Judo Team. More about the Foundation can be seen on our Facebook page. Ron C. Peck can be contacted at roncpeck(at)blindjudofoundation(dot)org or 1-425-444-8256 or Coach Willy Cahill at 1-650-589-0724


News Article | November 22, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

COLUMBIA, Mo. (Nov. 22, 2016) -- One out of every six American women has experienced a sexual assault or an attempted sexual assault or rape in her lifetime, according to the National Institute of Justice and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. While more than half of female survivors of rape report symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), previous research has found that not all survivors respond to traditional treatments for PTSD, causing their symptoms to resurface over time. Abigail Rolbiecki, Ph.D., a researcher at the University of Missouri School of Medicine, says that photovoice interventions, where participants express their thoughts and feelings through photos, combined with traditional PTSD treatments, could result in a more complete recovery for survivors of sexual assault. "Photovoice gives vulnerable populations an alternative way to express themselves, allowing survivors to use photographs to help convey their thoughts and feelings," Rolbiecki said. "Participants took photos that represented their strengths, weaknesses, triggers and their processes of obtaining justice. The intervention allowed participants to gently expose themselves to their triggers and discuss their thoughts and feelings about their experience in a safe and supportive environment." Rolbiecki said that current PTSD treatments are designed to help survivors manage their anxiety when confronting triggers, but offer little support at addressing the powerlessness survivors may feel as a result of their experience. "The typical approaches to treating PTSD are not specifically designed to foster post traumatic growth and empowerment for survivors," Rolbiecki said. "These approaches rarely provide an opportunity for survivors to rewrite their story and make meaning of their experiences, which is important and necessary for growth." In the study, Rolbiecki recruited nine women who had experienced a sexual assault at any time in their lives. Each woman was given a camera and instructed to take photos that captured her experience with sexual assault and recovery. The women met weekly as group to discuss their pictures. After group discussions were complete, the participants worked together to plan an invitation-only photography exhibit to educate others about sexual assault and sexual assault policies. Rolbiecki interviewed each participant after the exhibits to further discuss their experience with photovoice as a therapeutic intervention. Rolbiecki said that after the intervention was complete, the participants reported decreases in PTSD symptoms and self-blame, and increases in their post traumatic growth, particularly with their personal strength. "Survivors of sexual assaults are often identified by society as victims," Rolbiecki said. "Photovoice allows participants to redefine themselves despite their victimization. Through this tool, survivors can share their story with complete control of how it is told; allowing them to re-enter the world with a story solely authored by themselves." Rolbiecki said that results from her study show that photovoice has therapeutic implications, especially in terms of treating trauma through creating and critically discussing photo narratives. Rolbiecki is a post-doctoral fellow in the Department of Family and Community Medicine. She previously worked at the University of Missouri's Relationship and Sexual Violence Prevention Center. Rolbiecki's study, "Waiting for the Cold to End:' Using Photovoice as a Narrative Intervention for Survivors of Sexual Assault," recently was published in Traumatology, an international journal for health professionals who study and treat people exposed to highly stressful and traumatic events.


News Article | March 8, 2016
Site: news.yahoo.com

In reaction to model Ashley Graham gracing the cover of Sports Illustrated's latest swimsuit issue, former Sports Illustrated cover girl and supermodel Cheryl Tiegs sounded not so positive about women with larger waistlines. "I don't like it that we're talking about full-figured women, because it's glamorizing them, and your waist should be smaller than 35 [inches]," Tiegs said in an interview with E! on the red carpet of the 13th Annual Global Green USA pre-Oscar party. She has since clarified her response in a letter published by The Huffington Post, explaining that she did not mean to attack Graham personally and that she, herself, has a 37-inch waist. Celebrity feuds aside, Tiegs' reaction left many people curious about whether a 35-inch waist is a true marker of health. Experts say that, as with most medical guidelines, the facts are complicated. "Like any type of clinical cutoff, it's the result of these larger-scale studies," said Dr. Bruce Y. Lee, director of the Global Obesity Prevention Center and associate professor of international health at Johns Hopkins University, in an interview with Live Science. "Any cutoff is not an absolute, hard cutoff. It's not as if someone at 34.9 is different from someone at 35.1." Rules of thumb like this one represent data that's often distilled from thousands of people, and are meant as generalizations, Lee said. [Your Heart Health: 5 Numbers to Know] In the case of the 35-inch waist, the number gained substantial support from a study published in Circulation that used data from the large and long-running Nurses' Health Study, which followed a group of nearly 45,000 U.S. women over 16 years. The finding was published in 2008. The women in the study who had waists larger than 35 inches had almost double the risk of dying from heart disease, compared with those whose waists were under 28 inches, the researchers said. And the women in the study who had the largest waist circumference also had a much higher risk of dying from cancer or any other cause, than women with the smallest waists. All of the health risks increased steadily as waist circumference increased. Too much fat around the waist, which researchers sometimes call "central obesity," is also associated with an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes and hypertension, Lee said. The average waist size of U.S women ages 20 and over is 37.5 inches, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. No one is sure why abdominal fat is more problematic for health than fat elsewhere in the body, but it does seem to act differently. Some experts have suggested that these fat cells around the waistline may interfere with the normal balance of hormones, negatively affecting insulin sensitivity, blood sugar and blood pressure. As a result of this and other research, the American Heart Association and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute tell people to aim for a waist circumference smaller than 35 inches for women, and 40 inches for men. The International Diabetes Foundation goes further, setting a waistline goal of 31.5 inches for European women and 37 inches for European men. The groups' recommended waist sizes for Asian populations are slightly smaller, and it has yet to gather enough data to set specific standards for other ethnic groups. So should you panic if you measure 37 inches around the middle? Probably not, said Lisa Harnack, professor and co-director of the University of Minnesota Obesity Prevention Center, in an interview with Live Science. "There are actually quite a few risk factors for heart disease and type 2 diabetes, and this is just one of them," she said. [The Best Way to Lose Weight Safely] Waist circumference is one of many measures of health and, similar to body mass index (BMI), it can't tell us much on it's own. "The real issue is that each of these measurements is only a single view into the person," Lee said. He likened singular health measurements to a pinhole in a box where the patient is inside. Each only allows a small view into the person's overall health, and no single measurement can show all the important information. Both Harnack and Lee agreed that people can be overweight and healthy, just as people can be thin and unhealthy. However, going back to the general rule, a person's health will very likely be improved if he or she falls within the guidelines for a healthy waist circumference, they said. Copyright 2016 LiveScience, a Purch company. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


News Article | February 21, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

COLUMBIA, Mo. - Parental involvement is commonly viewed as vital to student academic success by most education experts and researchers; however, the quality of research on how to measure and improve parental involvement is lacking. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri have found that teacher ratings of parental involvement early in a child's academic career can accurately predict the child's academic and social success. Additionally, they found that a teacher training program can help improve the quantity and quality of teacher-parent interactions. Keith Herman, a professor in the MU College of Education and co-director of the Missouri Prevention Center, says these findings show the importance of teacher-parent connections and also the need for training teachers on how to create effective relationships with all parents. "It's clear from years of research that teacher perceptions, even perceptions of which they are not aware, can greatly impact student success," Herman said. "If a teacher has a good relationship with a student's parents or perceives that those parents are positively engaged in their child's education, that teacher may be more likely to give extra attention or go the extra mile for that student. If the same teacher perceives another child's parents to be uninvolved or to have a negative influence on the child's education, it likely will affect how the teacher interacts with both the child and the parent." For their study, Herman and a team of MU researchers randomly assigned more than 100 teachers to receive a professional development program called the Incredible Years. The program is designed to prepare teachers to develop more effective relationships with parents and students, and to improve their classroom management skills. Teachers completed surveys about their more than 1,800 students and parents at the beginning and end of the school year, including answering questions asking about the quantity and quality of their relationships with parents and the parents' involvement in their children's education. The researchers also collected ratings and observations on student behavior and academic performance. Children whose parents were identified by teachers as more positively involved had higher levels of prosocial behaviors and more academic success. Additionally, the researchers found that parents who had children in classrooms where teachers received the training were more likely to develop more positive behaviors, including higher involvement and bonding with the teacher. "Negative perceptions often bring out negative behaviors," Herman said. "We also know, from this and prior studies, that teachers are more likely to report less comfort and alignment with parents whose children have academic and social problems, and parents from low income and/or from racial or ethnic minority groups. In other words, often the families and students who need the most positive attention and support to re-engage them in education, are often the ones who are viewed the least favorably. Fortunately, this study shows that we can support teachers to improve their relationships with all parents, resulting in a better education for all children while also encouraging parents to become more involved in the education process." Herman and other MU researchers have successfully implemented a teacher training program that improves teacher-parent relationships and creates more positive perceptions of parental involvement. Papers outlining this study and the teacher training program have been accepted for publication in School Psychology Quarterly and the Journal of School Psychology. Wendy Reinke, professor in the MU College of Education and co-director of the Missouri Prevention Center, co-authored both studies with Herman. Aaron Thompson, an assistant professor in the MU School of Social Work within the College of Human Environmental Sciences, was the lead author on the teacher training study published in the Journal of School Psychology. Melissa Stormont, a professor in the MU College of Education, and Carolyn Webster-Stratton, a professor emeritus at the University of Washington, also co-wrote Thompson's paper with Herman and Reinke.


News Article | February 24, 2017
Site: www.futurity.org

Teacher ratings of parental involvement early in a child’s academic career can accurately predict the child’s academic and social success, new research shows. The findings show the importance of teacher-parent connections and also the need for training teachers on how to create effective relationships with all parents, says Keith Herman, a professor in the University of Missouri College of Education and co-director of the Missouri Prevention Center. “It’s clear from years of research that teacher perceptions, even perceptions of which they are not aware, can greatly impact student success,” Herman says. “If a teacher has a good relationship with a student’s parents or perceives that those parents are positively engaged in their child’s education, that teacher may be more likely to give extra attention or go the extra mile for that student. “If the same teacher perceives another child’s parents to be uninvolved or to have a negative influence on the child’s education, it likely will affect how the teacher interacts with both the child and the parent.” For their study, Herman and colleagues randomly assigned more than 100 teachers to receive a professional development program called the Incredible Years. The program aims to prepare teachers to develop more effective relationships with parents and students, and to improve their classroom management skills. Teachers completed surveys about their more than 1,800 students and parents at the beginning and end of the school year, including answering questions asking about the quantity and quality of their relationships with parents and the parents’ involvement in their children’s education. The researchers also collected ratings and observations on student behavior and academic performance. Children whose parents were identified by teachers as more positively involved had higher levels of prosocial behaviors and more academic success. Additionally, the researchers found that parents who had children in classrooms where teachers received the training were more likely to develop more positive behaviors, including higher involvement and bonding with the teacher. “Negative perceptions often bring out negative behaviors,” Herman says. “We also know, from this and prior studies, that teachers are more likely to report less comfort and alignment with parents whose children have academic and social problems, and parents from low-income and/or from racial or ethnic minority groups. In other words, often the families and students who need the most positive attention and support to re-engage them in education, are often the ones who are viewed the least favorably. “Fortunately, this study shows that we can support teachers to improve their relationships with all parents, resulting in a better education for all children while also encouraging parents to become more involved in the education process.” Herman and colleagues have successfully implemented a teacher-training program that improves teacher-parent relationships and creates more positive perceptions of parental involvement. Papers outlining this study and the teacher-training program have been accepted for publication in School Psychology Quarterly and the Journal of School Psychology.

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