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News Article | February 27, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Head Sensei (Instructor) Ian Vosper says, “Judo is the best martial art for the blind and visually impaired.” He speaks with authority having worked with the blind and visually impaired before opening the Rock Hill Judo Academy in 2015. Ian continues saying, “Judo is a positive and productive art for the blind.” Today, bullying issues continue to plague our society 2 - 3 times more to individuals with disabilities like low vision or blindness. Sensei Ian does not advocate physical aggression when competent in Judo but to be able to confront the bully and disarm the situation of this unfortunate epidemic facing society today. There is zero tolerance for bullying whether on the tatami (Judo mat) or off. Rock Hill Judo Academy and the Blind Judo Foundation are recognized by PACER’s National Bullying Prevention Center as a Champion Against Bullying. Judo is about touch, feeling and motion which makes it an ideal sport for the blind and visually impaired. In the Paralympics, a visually impaired Judoka (Judo athlete) competes against another visually impaired Judoka. However, in most non-Paralympic Judo events, a sighted person is the competition. Many who are not familiar with blind Judo question the pairing of a sighted person against the visually impaired until they see the results. Judo training reaches beyond the sport of Judo by infiltrating the very fiber of the student. Most Judoka and loved ones will report better school grades; relationship with parents and peers; opportunity for employment and becoming a productive person of the community. Being a champion on the Judo mat translates to being a champion off the mat. In the LightHouse News Winter 2017 Letter of the San Francisco LightHouse for the Blind and Visually Impaired, reports that 60% - 70% of legally blind people remain unemployed. Rigorous and enthusiastic support by family, friends, donors, foundations and grants are making a difference. Here is where Judo becomes the catalyst for building confidence, character, compassion, making commitments, humility, respect and responsibility. There’s not much a blind person can’t do if given the tools and opportunity. Judo is one such “tool.” Check out Rock Hill Judo Academy and their outstanding staff of seasoned Instructors and their empathy to empower and enhance the blind and visually impaired through the sport of Judo. The Blind Judo Foundation is a nonprofit 501(c) (3) organization who introduces and trains blind and visually impaired children, young adults and our returning blind and visually impaired military men and women in the sport of Judo. Supporting our blind athletes to train, travel, attend camps and compete relies upon your tax-exempt donations. All members of the Blind Judo Foundation are volunteers. A select few of our elite athletes go on to represent the USA as members of the US Paralympic (not to be confused with Special Olympics) Judo Team. More about the Foundation can be seen on our Facebook page. Ron C. Peck can be contacted at roncpeck(at)blindjudofoundation(dot)org or 1-425-444-8256 or Coach Willy Cahill at 1-650-589-0724


News Article | March 8, 2016
Site: news.yahoo.com

In reaction to model Ashley Graham gracing the cover of Sports Illustrated's latest swimsuit issue, former Sports Illustrated cover girl and supermodel Cheryl Tiegs sounded not so positive about women with larger waistlines. "I don't like it that we're talking about full-figured women, because it's glamorizing them, and your waist should be smaller than 35 [inches]," Tiegs said in an interview with E! on the red carpet of the 13th Annual Global Green USA pre-Oscar party. She has since clarified her response in a letter published by The Huffington Post, explaining that she did not mean to attack Graham personally and that she, herself, has a 37-inch waist. Celebrity feuds aside, Tiegs' reaction left many people curious about whether a 35-inch waist is a true marker of health. Experts say that, as with most medical guidelines, the facts are complicated. "Like any type of clinical cutoff, it's the result of these larger-scale studies," said Dr. Bruce Y. Lee, director of the Global Obesity Prevention Center and associate professor of international health at Johns Hopkins University, in an interview with Live Science. "Any cutoff is not an absolute, hard cutoff. It's not as if someone at 34.9 is different from someone at 35.1." Rules of thumb like this one represent data that's often distilled from thousands of people, and are meant as generalizations, Lee said. [Your Heart Health: 5 Numbers to Know] In the case of the 35-inch waist, the number gained substantial support from a study published in Circulation that used data from the large and long-running Nurses' Health Study, which followed a group of nearly 45,000 U.S. women over 16 years. The finding was published in 2008. The women in the study who had waists larger than 35 inches had almost double the risk of dying from heart disease, compared with those whose waists were under 28 inches, the researchers said. And the women in the study who had the largest waist circumference also had a much higher risk of dying from cancer or any other cause, than women with the smallest waists. All of the health risks increased steadily as waist circumference increased. Too much fat around the waist, which researchers sometimes call "central obesity," is also associated with an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes and hypertension, Lee said. The average waist size of U.S women ages 20 and over is 37.5 inches, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. No one is sure why abdominal fat is more problematic for health than fat elsewhere in the body, but it does seem to act differently. Some experts have suggested that these fat cells around the waistline may interfere with the normal balance of hormones, negatively affecting insulin sensitivity, blood sugar and blood pressure. As a result of this and other research, the American Heart Association and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute tell people to aim for a waist circumference smaller than 35 inches for women, and 40 inches for men. The International Diabetes Foundation goes further, setting a waistline goal of 31.5 inches for European women and 37 inches for European men. The groups' recommended waist sizes for Asian populations are slightly smaller, and it has yet to gather enough data to set specific standards for other ethnic groups. So should you panic if you measure 37 inches around the middle? Probably not, said Lisa Harnack, professor and co-director of the University of Minnesota Obesity Prevention Center, in an interview with Live Science. "There are actually quite a few risk factors for heart disease and type 2 diabetes, and this is just one of them," she said. [The Best Way to Lose Weight Safely] Waist circumference is one of many measures of health and, similar to body mass index (BMI), it can't tell us much on it's own. "The real issue is that each of these measurements is only a single view into the person," Lee said. He likened singular health measurements to a pinhole in a box where the patient is inside. Each only allows a small view into the person's overall health, and no single measurement can show all the important information. Both Harnack and Lee agreed that people can be overweight and healthy, just as people can be thin and unhealthy. However, going back to the general rule, a person's health will very likely be improved if he or she falls within the guidelines for a healthy waist circumference, they said. Copyright 2016 LiveScience, a Purch company. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The Blind Judo Foundation's Co-Founder and Head Coach of Cahill’s Judo Academy has a history of producing champions in the sport of Judo. Many of his current and former students (Judoka) can be found through out the US and many foreign countries. With a history of working with disabilities including the blind and visually impaired has brought Head Sensei, Ian Vosper of Rock Hill Judo Academy (Dojo) to the forefront in becoming a recognized Affiliate of the Blind Judo Foundation. Familiarity with blind Judo is not only a community asset but an opportunity for introducing and training the blind and visually impaired in the ancient sport of Judo. Sensei Ian started Judo at the early age of 9 in Devon, England and has had Judo in his blood ever since. He was introduced to and trained blind children in the sport of Judo. It was a natural for the newly formed Rock Hill Judo Academy, in Rock Hill, SC to incorporate those earlier skills being taught by the legendary Coach Willy Cahill of the Blind Judo Foundation and Sensei Ian himself. The Rock Hill Judo Academy is fortunate to also have Sensei Mary Krug Lozner, an Instructor and Member of the Academy staff. Sensei Mary was the first American to win a Gold Medal in an International Judo competition at the British Open in London. Having this type of talent and experience will greatly benefit all those who come before her dedicated to studying and learning the ancient sport of Judo. Sensei Norm Cleva another Instructor at the Rock Hill Judo Academy has been practicing Judo since 1960 representing the Navy Marine Team at the 1964 Olympic Trials. He is a two-time 1986 and 1992 National Judo Champion in the Masters Division. Since Sensei Norm discovered the Rock Hill Judo Academy, he has been able to bring his years of experience to the students (Judoka) of the Academy. The life enhancing skills of Judo goes beyond the color of one’s belt. Judo is about building confidence, compassion, character, commitments, humility, respect and responsibility. It is also a great defense against the domestic and international epidemic of bullying. The Blind Judo Foundation and Rock Hill Judo Academy have a zero tolerance for bullying whether on the mat or off and are recognized by PACER's National Bullying Prevention Center as Champions Against Bullying. Judo training is not intended to bring harm to a bully but to confront the epidemic. About us: The Blind Judo Foundation is a nonprofit 501(c) (3) organization who introduces and trains blind and visually impaired children, young adults and our returning blind and visually impaired military men and women in the sport of Judo. Supporting our blind athletes to train, travel, attend camps and compete relies upon your tax-exempt donations. All members of the Blind Judo Foundation are volunteers. A select few of our elite athletes go on to represent the USA as members of the US Paralympic (not to be confused with Special Olympics) Judo Team. More about the Foundation can be seen on our Facebook page. Ron C. Peck can be contacted at roncpeck(at)blindjudofoundation(dot)org or 1-425-444-8256 or Coach Willy Cahill at 1-650-589-0724


News Article | November 22, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

COLUMBIA, Mo. (Nov. 22, 2016) -- One out of every six American women has experienced a sexual assault or an attempted sexual assault or rape in her lifetime, according to the National Institute of Justice and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. While more than half of female survivors of rape report symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), previous research has found that not all survivors respond to traditional treatments for PTSD, causing their symptoms to resurface over time. Abigail Rolbiecki, Ph.D., a researcher at the University of Missouri School of Medicine, says that photovoice interventions, where participants express their thoughts and feelings through photos, combined with traditional PTSD treatments, could result in a more complete recovery for survivors of sexual assault. "Photovoice gives vulnerable populations an alternative way to express themselves, allowing survivors to use photographs to help convey their thoughts and feelings," Rolbiecki said. "Participants took photos that represented their strengths, weaknesses, triggers and their processes of obtaining justice. The intervention allowed participants to gently expose themselves to their triggers and discuss their thoughts and feelings about their experience in a safe and supportive environment." Rolbiecki said that current PTSD treatments are designed to help survivors manage their anxiety when confronting triggers, but offer little support at addressing the powerlessness survivors may feel as a result of their experience. "The typical approaches to treating PTSD are not specifically designed to foster post traumatic growth and empowerment for survivors," Rolbiecki said. "These approaches rarely provide an opportunity for survivors to rewrite their story and make meaning of their experiences, which is important and necessary for growth." In the study, Rolbiecki recruited nine women who had experienced a sexual assault at any time in their lives. Each woman was given a camera and instructed to take photos that captured her experience with sexual assault and recovery. The women met weekly as group to discuss their pictures. After group discussions were complete, the participants worked together to plan an invitation-only photography exhibit to educate others about sexual assault and sexual assault policies. Rolbiecki interviewed each participant after the exhibits to further discuss their experience with photovoice as a therapeutic intervention. Rolbiecki said that after the intervention was complete, the participants reported decreases in PTSD symptoms and self-blame, and increases in their post traumatic growth, particularly with their personal strength. "Survivors of sexual assaults are often identified by society as victims," Rolbiecki said. "Photovoice allows participants to redefine themselves despite their victimization. Through this tool, survivors can share their story with complete control of how it is told; allowing them to re-enter the world with a story solely authored by themselves." Rolbiecki said that results from her study show that photovoice has therapeutic implications, especially in terms of treating trauma through creating and critically discussing photo narratives. Rolbiecki is a post-doctoral fellow in the Department of Family and Community Medicine. She previously worked at the University of Missouri's Relationship and Sexual Violence Prevention Center. Rolbiecki's study, "Waiting for the Cold to End:' Using Photovoice as a Narrative Intervention for Survivors of Sexual Assault," recently was published in Traumatology, an international journal for health professionals who study and treat people exposed to highly stressful and traumatic events.


News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Each October, for 10 years now, communities have joined together to campaign to put an end to bullying. What began in 2006 as a week-long education and advocacy event, sponsored by PACER, has grown into a month of school and community activities created to increase awareness, improve prevention, and put an end to bullying in the United States. Since their inception in 1977, PACER (Parent Advocacy Coalition for Educational Rights) Center has embodied their mission statement, “champions for children with disabilities.” PACER’s National Bullying Prevention Center advocates for the end of all bullying, including that which targets children with disabilities. This year’s theme is “A decade together against bullying—and united for kindness, acceptance and inclusion.” In addition to the resources available through PACER’s National Bullying Prevention Center, the state-sponsored stopbullying.gov has resources for families and communities. The complex relationship between bullying and addiction has only recently been documented, and important research continues to emerge. To date, bullying has been linked to increased likelihood of suicide, depression, anxiety and substance use, among other conditions (as reported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention). Young people who engage in bullying behavior, as well as the students receiving such bullying, may experience mental health consequences at the time or in later life. Those who are both bully and victim have greater risk of mental health and behavior problems than students who are only bully or bullied. Unfortunately, in some cases, bullying leads to addiction. At Serenity Recovery Center, we understand the multi-faceted components of addiction, and the need for an individualized treatment program that addresses them. From the emotional consequences of bullying, such as co-occurring disorders (or dual disorders like depression and anxiety), to fear, isolation and academic consequences, working with adolescent specialists can lead to recovery. Serenity advocates for effective treatment of addiction for both bully and bullied. As a community, we can advocate for stronger bullying legislation, intervention education and treatment. Laws and school policy that prevent bullying serve the community. Peer or adult intervention in instances of bullying can have miraculous results. Effective behavioral or substance use treatment can save lives. Together, we can put an end to bullying in our community. To learn more or to get help for yourself or a loved one, call 1-855-218-3775 or visit the Serenity Recovery website: http://www.serenityrehab.org


News Article | December 20, 2016
Site: globenewswire.com

DAYTON, Ohio, Dec. 20, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- In 2016, the CareSource Foundation celebrated its 10th anniversary by awarding $2.8 million to 147 deserving nonprofit organizations throughout Ohio. Since 2006, the CareSource Foundation has awarded over 1,000 grants and invested $14.5 million to strengthen the network of health and human service nonprofit organizations throughout the state. In the second half 2016, the CareSource Foundation provided nearly $1.5 million in funding to 66 organizations in Ohio through 2 signature grants, 6 surprise grants and 58 responsive grants. The grants were selected through a rigorous review process that evaluates innovation, impact and sustainability. The high-impact signature grants included a focus on coordinated mental health care services, affordable housing and health services for low-income pregnant women. The CareSource Foundation provides grants to nonprofits who are working to eliminate poverty, provide much-needed services to low and moderate-income families, build healthier communities and develop innovative approaches to address significant social issues. "In the CareSource Foundation's 10-year history, we've had the opportunity to invest in over 1,000 important, innovative nonprofits throughout Ohio," said Cathy Ponitz, Vice President, CareSource Foundation. "These organizations make positive transformations in the lives of thousands of vulnerable children and families. We are inspired by their work and proud of the partnerships we have shaped together over the past decade. Ultimately, these partnerships create models of positive change that impact our communities and broader social structure for the better." 10th Anniversary Celebration The CareSource Foundation's 10th Anniversary milestone was celebrated through 10 surprise grants given to deserving community partners. A total of $100,000 was given in surprise grants with each of the following 10 organizations receiving $10,000. Six of these grants were awarded in the second half of 2016. CareSource Signature Grant Recipients The CareSource Foundation awarded three signature grants in the remainder of 2016. These awards are focused on innovative, high-impact approaches to solving critical social issues. In total, $1,050,000 in awards have been allocated to the following organizations: Funding by Region In addition to the three signature grants awarded to organizations in Dayton, Columbus and Troy, 58 responsive grants and six 10th Anniversary Surprise Grants were given in the second half of 2016. Columbus and Cleveland area nonprofits received more than $100,000 in grants while over $1,000,000 was invested in the Dayton region through responsive and signature grants. Athens / Pike County / Portsmouth - $22,000 Live Healthy Appalachia (10th Anniversary Grant) Pike County Outreach Council of Churches Potter's House Ministries Cincinnati / Hamilton - $56,000 Big Brothers and Sisters of Warren and Clinton counties Changing Gears (10th Anniversary Grant) First Step Home Healthy Beginnings Mercy Neighborhood Ministries Parachute Butler County CASA People Working Cooperatively Pro Bono Partnership of Ohio Cleveland / Akron / Canton / Youngstown - $148,300 Achievement Centers for Children Akron-Canton Regional Foodbank (10th Anniversary Grant) Antonine Sisters Adult Day Care Carmella Rose Health Foundation Center for Advanced Mental Health Practice (CAMHP) Foundation City of Cleveland, Department of Public Health Cleveland Hearing and Speech (10th Anniversary Grant) Domestic Violence Project Far West Center Greenleaf Family Center Lake County Free Clinic Mature Services Medworks Neighborhood Alliance Rape Crisis Center Society for Handicapped Citizens of Medina County Visiting Nurse Association of Ohio Voyager Program We Care We Share Yesh Tikvah Zanes Foundation Columbus / Delaware / Mt. Vernon - $152,500 Association for the Developmentally Disabled Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Ohio CHOICES for Victims of Domestic Violence Community Development for All People (Signature Grant) Joseph's Coat of Central Ohio Mercy and Grace on Wheels New Directions Domestic Abuse Shelter Prevent Blindness Ohio (10th Anniversary Grant) Recreation Unlimited Foundation Reeb Avenue Center SON Ministries of Ohio University Area Enrichment Association Welcome Warehouse Dayton / Springfield - $1,077,000 African Christian Community Center Agape for Youth Clark County Literacy Coalition College Mentors for Kids East End Eastway Behavioral Health Family Violence Prevention Center Hannah's Treasure Chest Health Partners Free Clinic Levitt Pavilion Dayton (Signature Grant) Mercy Manor Specialized Alternatives for Families and Youth of Ohio Springfield Christian Youth Ministries Tri-County Board of Recovery and Mental Health Services (Signature Grant) Womanline of Dayton Toledo / Findlay - $44,000 Big Brothers Big Sisters of Northwest Ohio Findlay Hope House Mom's House (10th Anniversary Grant) Providence Center for Social and Economic Empowerment Sara's Garden Toledo Day Nursery Zepf Center About CareSource CareSource is a nonprofit health plan nationally recognized for leading the managed care industry in providing member-centric health care coverage. Founded in 1989, CareSource is one of the nation's largest Medicaid managed care plans. Today, CareSource offers a lifetime of health coverage to more than 1.5 million members across four states including offerings on the Health Insurance Marketplace and Medicare Advantage plans. Headquartered in Dayton, Ohio, CareSource has a workforce of 3,100 employees. CareSource is living its mission to make a lasting difference in its members' lives by improving their health and well-being. CareSource understands the challenges consumers face navigating the health system and works to put health care in reach for those it serves. For more, visit caresource.com, follow @caresource on Twitter, or like CareSource on Facebook.


News Article | November 14, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

COLUMBIA, Mo. - More than 22 percent of children from ages 12-18 say they have been bullied in school within the last month, while 17 percent of high school students say they have seriously considered attempting suicide within the last year. Research has shown that school principals play a vital role in improving and maintaining physically and emotionally safe schools; however, no training programs for principals currently exist that have been scientifically proven to help improve school safety. Now, school safety experts from the Missouri Prevention Center and the University of Missouri College of Education, have received a $4.1 million grant from the National Institute of Justice (NIJ) to study a training program specifically for principals. The program, Safe and Civil Schools Leadership, aims to help principals create and maintain safe learning environments. Keith Herman, a professor in the MU College of Education and co-director of the Missouri Prevention Center, says this work will lead to improved training methods for principals across the country. "We know that principals play a vital role in school safety, but the education system hasn't done a great job of training principals to manage all aspects of school safety," Herman said. "Our goal is to identify a program that improves school safety. By applying scientific methods, we can determine if this program is effective and worth implementing in schools across the country." The NIJ grant will support research of the Safe and Civil Schools Leadership program over the course of four years. The University of Missouri researchers will study the program in 60 middle schools and high schools across the Puget Sound region in state of Washington. "Safe and Civil Schools programs are all about getting evidence-based practices interpreted into educator-friendly language, organized in a practical format and implemented within a sustainable framework in order to promote the behavioral and academic success of all students," said Laura Matson, special services director for the Puget Sound Educational Service District. "We hope this program will provide our administrators with the necessary tools to lead, empower and sustain improved practices related to student behavior and school climate and we are excited to see how this important work can help further promote safety within our schools." The Safe and Civil Schools Leadership program teaches principals how to: During the study, the researchers will gather baseline data about each school's safety climate, such as physical safety, emotional safety, the rate of bully victimization and other important factors that determine the overall safety rating of each school. Additionally, past research has shown that high rates of tardiness within schools contribute to unsafe school environments. To combat this, the researchers will support principals in implementing an approach based on the same principles of Safe and Civil School Leadership, called START on Time, which has been shown to reduce tardiness rates within schools. This approach includes increasing the hallway presence of adults during passing periods; positive interactions between adults and students, such as greeting students at the door; and positive attention and encouragement for students who arrive on time. The researchers will provide these companion programs for reducing tardiness and improving school leadership at each school and measure the changes in those safety measures after two years compared to schools that did not utilize these programs. "High tardiness rates within schools contribute to less safe school environments," Herman said. "By first reducing tardiness rates, principals will be able to receive buy-in from teachers and students who will be able to see an immediate impact upon the safety of their schools. At that point, they will be well-positioned to implement the other aspects of the Safe and Civil Schools Leadership program, allowing us to determine its efficacy in promoting school safety." Herman says Safe and Civil Schools Leadership is a promising program for improving school safety because it teaches principals how to collect data about student, staff and parent perceptions of school climate and then how to make good, informed decisions based on that data to improve the safety climate. Also, Herman says the program already is well-recognized, has many easily understood features, is well-produced and could be distributed widely if it is proven to be effective. Other University of Missouri researchers involved on this NIJ-funded research grant include Wendy Reinke, professor of educational, school and counseling psychology and co-director of the Missouri Prevention Center; James Sebastian, an assistant professor of educational leadership and policy; Francis Huang, an assistant professor of educational, school and counseling psychology; and Aaron Thompson, an assistant professor of social work in the MU College of Human Environmental Sciences.


News Article | November 5, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

A form of yoga, Trauma-Sensitive Yoga (TSY), innovated by David Emerson at the Trauma Center at the Justice Resource Institute, has been shown to help patients suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), as well as chronically traumatized individuals. This includes military veterans, as well as survivors of chronic abuse. Bessel A. van der Kolk et al. have shown that TSY significantly reduces the symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in patients with chronic, traditional treatment-resistant PTSD. TSY has its foundations in trauma theory, attachment theory, neuroscience, Hatha Yoga, and breathing practices, with an emphasis on the recognition of somatic and kinesthetic sensations. Based on Dr. van der Kolk’s findings and the yoga techniques prescribed by Emerson, Dr. Carlo-Casellas, who trained at the Kripalu Center for Yoga and Health, started offering TSY at his Stress Management & Prevention Center (SMPC). Supporting his approach to teaching TSY is the fact that he also trained in Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (mindfulness in medicine) at the Center for Mindfulness established by Jon Kabat-Zinn, Ph.D., at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. Further to that, he has received training in mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) (Zindel V. Segal, et al.) as an adjunct therapy for preventing relapse in patients suffering with depression, specifically patients with major depressive disorders. TSY bears much in common with the contemplative practices, such as mindfulness meditation, where the focus is on the cultivation of perception of any sensation, including thoughts, emotions, sounds, visualizations, as well as somatic and kinesthetic sensations. In TSY, however, we limit ourselves exclusively to interoception—the perception of somatic and kinesthetic sensation only, not emotions or the interpretation of emotions such as mood, anger, sense of well-being, anxiety, or being sexually aroused. In TSY, the body, not the mind, is the center of attention. This is so because per Dr. Bessel van der Kolk, in his seminal work, The Body Keeps the Score, has shown that traumatized patients suffer from depersonalization—the outward manifestation of the biological freeze reaction, the characteristic blank stares and absent minds. These patients, instead of struggling to escape, they dissociate from their negative emotions and their bodies and lose their ability to perceive somatic and kinesthetic sensations. This sort of immobilization, generated in the reptilian brain, characterizes most chronically traumatized persons. For the teacher of TSY, the most important thing to do is use interoceptive words. That is, wording that invites the client to notice a somatic or kinesthetic sensation. For example, the patient is invited to “if you like, you may tilt your head downward, and as you so you may notice a sensation in the back of your neck or if you like, notice what you feel as you lift your head back up.” In addition to teaching TSY, Dr. Carlo-Casellas teaches other forms of life-long stress reduction modalities. He teaches mindfulness meditation, Yoga Nidra (the goal of which is to induce deep relaxation while comparing a positive and a negative event experienced in the past), hatha yoga, and restorative yoga. Restorative yoga is a type of gentle practice that uses bolsters, blankets, and other props to support the body, making it possible for the client to hold a posture for a longer period. Restorative yoga helps reduce stress and anxiety, increase energy, and improve physical and emotional well-being. It is particularly beneficial to clients suffering with chronic, inescapable stress, as well as those recovering from surgery, heart disease, cancer, and other stress related conditions. Those who have availed themselves of the services at the SMPC report that the yoga classes are very different from other yoga classes they have attended—the cues are different. But what makes the classes special are Dr. Carlo-Casellas’s soothing voice, gentle manner, his knowledge of the neurophysiology of how yoga modulates the structure and function of the brain, and the freedom he allows for the modification of the postures to fit the students’ needs, allowing him/her to experience the full effects of the practice to a maximum. Jaime Carlo-Casellas, Ph.D., is the Founding Director of the Stress Management & Prevention Center in Rancho Mirage, California. His reason for founding the Center was to help those who suffer from psychological and physical conditions, who feel depressed, and who are stuck and do not know which way to turn. To this end, he works closely with physicians and therapists who treat stress-related disorders. He can be reached by phone (760-464-2150) or email (casellas(at)stressprevention(dot)org). The SMPC is located at 69550 Highway 111, Suite 204, Rancho Mirage, CA 92270. Please see our Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/StressPrevention/ Please see our LinkedIn page: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jaime-aka-kabir-casellas-ph-d-50a01a9?trk=nav_responsive_tab_profile_pic


News Article | February 24, 2017
Site: www.futurity.org

Teacher ratings of parental involvement early in a child’s academic career can accurately predict the child’s academic and social success, new research shows. The findings show the importance of teacher-parent connections and also the need for training teachers on how to create effective relationships with all parents, says Keith Herman, a professor in the University of Missouri College of Education and co-director of the Missouri Prevention Center. “It’s clear from years of research that teacher perceptions, even perceptions of which they are not aware, can greatly impact student success,” Herman says. “If a teacher has a good relationship with a student’s parents or perceives that those parents are positively engaged in their child’s education, that teacher may be more likely to give extra attention or go the extra mile for that student. “If the same teacher perceives another child’s parents to be uninvolved or to have a negative influence on the child’s education, it likely will affect how the teacher interacts with both the child and the parent.” For their study, Herman and colleagues randomly assigned more than 100 teachers to receive a professional development program called the Incredible Years. The program aims to prepare teachers to develop more effective relationships with parents and students, and to improve their classroom management skills. Teachers completed surveys about their more than 1,800 students and parents at the beginning and end of the school year, including answering questions asking about the quantity and quality of their relationships with parents and the parents’ involvement in their children’s education. The researchers also collected ratings and observations on student behavior and academic performance. Children whose parents were identified by teachers as more positively involved had higher levels of prosocial behaviors and more academic success. Additionally, the researchers found that parents who had children in classrooms where teachers received the training were more likely to develop more positive behaviors, including higher involvement and bonding with the teacher. “Negative perceptions often bring out negative behaviors,” Herman says. “We also know, from this and prior studies, that teachers are more likely to report less comfort and alignment with parents whose children have academic and social problems, and parents from low-income and/or from racial or ethnic minority groups. In other words, often the families and students who need the most positive attention and support to re-engage them in education, are often the ones who are viewed the least favorably. “Fortunately, this study shows that we can support teachers to improve their relationships with all parents, resulting in a better education for all children while also encouraging parents to become more involved in the education process.” Herman and colleagues have successfully implemented a teacher-training program that improves teacher-parent relationships and creates more positive perceptions of parental involvement. Papers outlining this study and the teacher-training program have been accepted for publication in School Psychology Quarterly and the Journal of School Psychology.


News Article | February 21, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

COLUMBIA, Mo. - Parental involvement is commonly viewed as vital to student academic success by most education experts and researchers; however, the quality of research on how to measure and improve parental involvement is lacking. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri have found that teacher ratings of parental involvement early in a child's academic career can accurately predict the child's academic and social success. Additionally, they found that a teacher training program can help improve the quantity and quality of teacher-parent interactions. Keith Herman, a professor in the MU College of Education and co-director of the Missouri Prevention Center, says these findings show the importance of teacher-parent connections and also the need for training teachers on how to create effective relationships with all parents. "It's clear from years of research that teacher perceptions, even perceptions of which they are not aware, can greatly impact student success," Herman said. "If a teacher has a good relationship with a student's parents or perceives that those parents are positively engaged in their child's education, that teacher may be more likely to give extra attention or go the extra mile for that student. If the same teacher perceives another child's parents to be uninvolved or to have a negative influence on the child's education, it likely will affect how the teacher interacts with both the child and the parent." For their study, Herman and a team of MU researchers randomly assigned more than 100 teachers to receive a professional development program called the Incredible Years. The program is designed to prepare teachers to develop more effective relationships with parents and students, and to improve their classroom management skills. Teachers completed surveys about their more than 1,800 students and parents at the beginning and end of the school year, including answering questions asking about the quantity and quality of their relationships with parents and the parents' involvement in their children's education. The researchers also collected ratings and observations on student behavior and academic performance. Children whose parents were identified by teachers as more positively involved had higher levels of prosocial behaviors and more academic success. Additionally, the researchers found that parents who had children in classrooms where teachers received the training were more likely to develop more positive behaviors, including higher involvement and bonding with the teacher. "Negative perceptions often bring out negative behaviors," Herman said. "We also know, from this and prior studies, that teachers are more likely to report less comfort and alignment with parents whose children have academic and social problems, and parents from low income and/or from racial or ethnic minority groups. In other words, often the families and students who need the most positive attention and support to re-engage them in education, are often the ones who are viewed the least favorably. Fortunately, this study shows that we can support teachers to improve their relationships with all parents, resulting in a better education for all children while also encouraging parents to become more involved in the education process." Herman and other MU researchers have successfully implemented a teacher training program that improves teacher-parent relationships and creates more positive perceptions of parental involvement. Papers outlining this study and the teacher training program have been accepted for publication in School Psychology Quarterly and the Journal of School Psychology. Wendy Reinke, professor in the MU College of Education and co-director of the Missouri Prevention Center, co-authored both studies with Herman. Aaron Thompson, an assistant professor in the MU School of Social Work within the College of Human Environmental Sciences, was the lead author on the teacher training study published in the Journal of School Psychology. Melissa Stormont, a professor in the MU College of Education, and Carolyn Webster-Stratton, a professor emeritus at the University of Washington, also co-wrote Thompson's paper with Herman and Reinke.

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