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News Article | April 29, 2017
Site: www.theguardian.com

Inside a cluster of unremarkable industrial units off the A40 in west London is the epicentre of the 2017 hummus crisis. The buildings belong to Bakkavor, the international food manufacturer behind the mass withdrawal of the product from British supermarket shelves after customers complained of a metallic taste. These units off the Hanger Lane gyratory system – among 30 facilities on 19 different UK sites – manufacture hummus and other dips on an industrial scale for supermarket giants including Tesco, Sainsbury’s, Marks & Spencer, Waitrose, the Co-op, Asda and Morrisons, who sell them under their own brands. The little-known Bakkavor – set up 30 years ago in Iceland by brothers Ágúst and Lýdur Gudmundsson – is the UK’s leading provider of fresh prepared foods. Hummus is made on the Hanger Lane site, in a sectioned-off production area in the equivalent of the savoury dip nerve centre. The problem began after a batch of the product, made with imported chick peas, was found to have an uncharacteristic metallic tang. It had already been despatched in tubs, prompting Bakkavor to write to all its supermarket clients to warn of a problem with the manufacturing process. Marks & Spencer and Sainsbury’s both cleared some lines from their shelves after what Sainsbury’s described as “taste issues”. Bakkavor admitted there was a strange taste, but stressed there was no food safety issue. A spokesman for the Food Standards Agency said: “We’re seeking confirmation that this withdrawal was done on quality rather than safety grounds, and the information we’ve received so far shows there is no indication of a food safety concern. The FSA hadn’t been notified about this withdrawal, but food businesses only need to make us aware of withdrawals if they are for food safety reasons.” It has not been made clear what caused the metallic taste but in foods and beer it can be caused by chemical reactions affecting lipids (fats and oils). This would usually be the result of a combination of two types of reaction – hydrolysis and oxidisation – according to the book Advances in Meat, Poultry and Seafood Packaging, published by Woodhead Publishing. But the Scandinavian supermarket Sevan, which has also removed hummus from its shelves in recent weeks due to a mystery taste, put forward a different theory. The chain told Food Quality News it believed the unusual flavour came from chickpeas imported from Canada. Whatever the reason for the metallic tang, the UK shortages have had a knock-on effect for other retailers, as disappointed shoppers flocked to buy up their stock. Stocks have since been replenished and supermarkets say it is business as usual on the hummus front. But the sudden shortage has led to scrutiny of the the low-key and inevitably secretive world of mass food production, which takes place daily in similar buildings across the UK. Supermarkets routinely use the same suppliers to make similar products, although recipes are kept secret and all equipment is deep-cleaned between each rival production run. Derbyshire-based Matthew Walker, for example, turns out 26m Christmas puddings a year for all the major supermarkets and brands – from German discounters such as Lidl and Aldi through to Harrods and Waitrose. Similarly Mr Kipling – part of the Premier Foods group – makes mince pies and other cakes not only for its own-brand label but also for the UK’s major supermarkets and retailers. Talk of a crisis emerged amid Britons’ apparently insatiable appetite for hummus. A survey in 2013 marked Britain as the hummus capital of Europe, with 41% of people having pots in the fridge – almost twice as many as in any other country. A far-sighted Waitrose was the first British supermarket to stock hummus in the 1980s, with others following in the next decade. Chefs such as Yotam Ottolenghi, Claudia Roden and the Lebanese chef and author Anissa Helou have done much to popularise Middle Eastern foods in recent years, with shoppers now viewing hummus as a grocery staple. Fast-expanding supermarket ranges now include everything from reduced fat pastes to new-style versions made with beetroot or edamame beans. “It’s good that hummus has become so popular in the UK, although in the Middle East it’s not a dip eaten from a tub but a meal – and people often don’t know how a really good one tastes,” Ottolenghi told the Guardian. “You can now buy hummus at various levels and you can also make it yourself, which is what I recommend.” Nick Saltmarsh, founder of Hodmedod, which works closely with British farmers to produce homegrown grains and pulses, including fava beans, haricot beans and quinoa, said the situation “highlights, very sadly, the obscurity of our food system in the UK – so many people don’t know where our food comes from, never mind what’s in it and how it’s made”. Saltmarsh’s Suffolk-based company is currently working with the condiment firm Charlie & Ivy’s to launch a new fava bean hummus (using UK rapeseed rather than olive oil) at a food festival at the end of May. His UK-grown products have the backing of top chefs such as Ottolenghi, Mark Hix and Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall. “Hummus is one of our most popular dips,” says Joanna Black, hummus buyer at M&S. “As the trend for eastern Mediterranean-style foods and eating has grown, so has the demand for hummus. It’s no longer seen as an exotic food, but a more everyday item that customers are very familiar with.” But if there is one lesson from the shortlived hummus furore, it is to diversify your supply chain. Pret a Manger – now enjoying massive sales of hummus as a result of its new vegetarian and vegan menus – uses a different supplier and was completely unaffected.


News Article | April 28, 2017
Site: www.foodanddrinktechnology.com

XPO Logistics has won a long term contract with British food manufacturer Premier Foods, the company behind the likes of Mr Kipling, Oxo, Bisto and Ambrosia. This archived news article is restricted to logged-in subscribers. Login or subscribe now to view the full content of the article.


— The major players in global Frozen Bakery Products market include Aryzta, Klemme AG, Flowers Food, Grupo Bimbo, Lepage Bakeries, Associated Food, Elephant Atta, Kellogg Company, General Mills, Company ten, Switz Group, Dr. Oetkar, CSM, Premier Foods Plc, ConAgra Foods, Inc, Arz Fine Foods. Geographically, this report is segmented into several key Regions, with Sales, Sales, revenue, Market Share (%) and Growth Rate (%) of Frozen Bakery Products in these regions, from 2011 to 2022 (forecast), covering On the basis of product, the Frozen Bakery Products market is primarily split into Pizza(Par Baked ) Bread(Par Baked ) Cake and Pastry(Par Baked ) Bagels(Par Baked ) Bread(Pre-Proof ) Croissants(Pre-Proof ) Cookies(Pre-Proof ) On the basis on the end users/applications, this report covers Internet/E-commerce Family School Cafe Public Services Export opportunities Global Frozen Bakery Products Market Research Report 2017 1 Frozen Bakery Products Market Overview 1.1 Frozen Bakery Products Product Overview 1.2 Frozen Bakery Products Segment by Types (Product Category) 1.2.1 Global Frozen Bakery Products Sales and Growth (%) Comparison by Types (2012-2022) 1.2.2 Global Frozen Bakery Products Sales Market Share (%) by Types in 2016 1.2.3 Pizza(Par Baked ) 1.2.4 Bread(Par Baked ) 1.2.5 Cake and Pastry(Par Baked ) 1.2.6 Bagels(Par Baked ) 1.2.7 Bread(Pre-Proof ) 1.3 Global Frozen Bakery Products Segment by Applications 1.3.1 Global Frozen Bakery Products Sales (Kilogram) Comparison by Applications (2012-2022) 1.3.2 Internet/E-commerce 1.3.3 Family 1.3.4 School 1.3.5 Cafe 1.3.6 Public Services 1.4 Global Frozen Bakery Products Market by Regions (2012-2022) 1.4.1 Global Frozen Bakery Products Market Size and Growth (%) Comparison by Regions (2012-2022) 1.4.2 North America Frozen Bakery Products Status and Prospect (2012-2022) 1.4.3 Asia-Pacific Frozen Bakery Products Status and Prospect (2012-2022) 1.4.4 Europe Frozen Bakery Products Status and Prospect (2012-2022) 1.4.5 South America Frozen Bakery Products Status and Prospect (2012-2022) 1.4.6 Middle East and Africa Frozen Bakery Products Status and Prospect (2012-2022) 1.5 Global Frozen Bakery Products Market Size (2012-2022) 1.5.1 Global Frozen Bakery Products Revenue (Million USD) Status and Outlook (2012-2022) 1.5.2 Global Frozen Bakery Products Sales (Kilogram) Status and Outlook (2012-2022) 2 Global Frozen Bakery Products Market Competition by Manufacturers/Brand 2.1 Global Frozen Bakery Products Sales (Kilogram) and Share by Manufacturers (2012-2017) 2.2 Global Frozen Bakery Products Revenue (Million USD) and Share by Manufacturers (2012-2017) 2.3 Global Frozen Bakery Products Average Price (USD/Kilogram) by Manufacturers (2012-2017) 2.4 Manufacturers Frozen Bakery Products Manufacturing Base Distribution, Sales Area, Product Types 2.5 Frozen Bakery Products Market Competitive Situation and Trends 2.5.1 Frozen Bakery Products Market Concentration Rate 2.5.2 Frozen Bakery Products Market Share (%) of Top 3 and Top 5 Manufacturers 2.5.3 Mergers & Acquisitions, Expansion 3 Global Frozen Bakery Products Sales (Kilogram), Revenue (Million USD) by Regions (2012-2017) 3.2 Global Frozen Bakery Products Sales (Kilogram) and Market Share (%) by Regions (2012-2017) 3.3 Global Frozen Bakery Products Revenue (Million USD) and Market Share (%) by Regions (2012-2017) 3.3 Global Frozen Bakery Products Sales (Kilogram), Revenue (Million USD), Price (USD/Kilogram) and Gross Margin (%) (2012-2017) 3.5 North America Frozen Bakery Products Sales (Kilogram), Revenue (Million USD), Price (USD/Kilogram) and Gross Margin (%) (2012-2017) 3.6 Europe Frozen Bakery Products Sales (Kilogram), Revenue (Million USD), Price (USD/Kilogram) and Gross Margin (%) (2012-2017) 3.7 Asia-Pacific Frozen Bakery Products Sales (Kilogram), Revenue (Million USD), Price (USD/Kilogram) and Gross Margin (%) (2012-2017) 3.8 South America Frozen Bakery Products Sales (Kilogram), Revenue (Million USD), Price (USD/Kilogram) and Gross Margin (2012-2017) 3.9 Middle East and Africa Frozen Bakery Products Sales (Kilogram), Revenue (Million USD), Price (USD/Kilogram) and Gross Margin (%) (2012-2017) 4 Global Frozen Bakery Products Sales, Revenue, Price Trend by Types 4.1 Global Frozen Bakery Products Sales (Kilogram) and Market Share (%) by Types (2012-2017) 4.2 Global Frozen Bakery Products Revenue and Market Share (%) by Types (2012-2017) 4.3 Global Frozen Bakery Products Price (USD/Kilogram) by Type (2012-2017) 4.4 Global Frozen Bakery Products Sales Growth by Type (2012-2017) 5 Global Frozen Bakery Products Market Analysis by Applications 5.1 Global Frozen Bakery Products Sales (Kilogram) and Market Share (%) by Applications (2012-2017) 5.2 Global Frozen Bakery Products Sales Growth Rate (%) by Applications (2012-2017) 6 Global Frozen Bakery Products Manufacturers Profiles/Analysis 6.1 Aryzta 6.1.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base, Sales Area and Its Competitors 6.1.2 Frozen Bakery Products Product Category, End Uses and Specification 6.1.2.1 Product A 6.1.2.2 Product B 6.1.3 Aryzta Frozen Bakery Products Sales (Kilogram), Revenue (Million USD), Price (USD/Kilogram), Gross Margin (%) and Market Share (%) (2012-2017) For more information, please visit http://www.wiseguyreports.com


This report studies the Frozen Bakery Products market status and outlook of global and United States, from angles of players, regions, product types and end industries; this report analyzes the top players in global and United States market, and splits the Frozen Bakery Products market by product type and applications/end industries. The global Frozen Bakery Products market is valued at XX million USD in 2016 and is expected to reach XX million USD by the end of 2022, growing at a CAGR of XX% between 2016 and 2022. For more information or any query mail at sales@wiseguyreports.com The Asia-Pacific will occupy for more market share in following years, especially in China, also fast growing India and Southeast Asia regions. North America, especially The United States, will still play an important role which cannot be ignored. Any changes from United States might affect the development trend of Frozen Bakery Products. United States plays an important role in global market, with market size of xx million USD in 2016 and will be xx million USD in 2022, with a CAGR of XX. Geographically, this report is segmented into several key regions, with sales, revenue, market share (%) and growth Rate (%) of Frozen Bakery Products in these regions, from 2012 to 2022 (forecast), covering United States North America Europe Asia-Pacific South America Middle East and Africa The major players in global and United States Frozen Bakery Products market, including Klemme AG, Flowers Food, Grupo Bimbo, Lepage Bakeries, Associated Food, Elephant Atta, Kellogg Company, General Mills, Switz Group, Dr. Oetkar, CSM, Premier Foods Plc, ConAgra Foods, Inc, Arz Fine Foods, Teeny Foods. The On the basis of product, the Frozen Bakery Products market is primarily split into Pizza(Par Baked ) Bread(Par Baked ) Cake and Pastry(Par Baked ) On the basis on the end users/applications, this report covers Family School Cafe Public Services Export opportunities 2 Frozen Bakery Products Market Overview 2.1 Frozen Bakery Products Product Overview 2.2 Frozen Bakery Products Market Segment by Type 2.2.1 Pizza(Par Baked ) 2.2.2 Bread(Par Baked ) 2.2.3 Cake and Pastry(Par Baked ) 2.2.4 Bagels(Par Baked ) 2.3 Global Frozen Bakery Products Product Segment by Type 2.3.1 Global Frozen Bakery Products Sales (Kilogram) and Growth (%) by Types (2012, 2016 and 2022) 2.3.2 Global Frozen Bakery Products Sales (Kilogram) and Market Share (%) by Types (2012-2017) 2.3.3 Global Frozen Bakery Products Revenue (Million USD) and Market Share (%) by Types (2012-2017) 2.3.4 Global Frozen Bakery Products Price (USD/Kilogram) by Type (2012-2017) 2.4 United States Frozen Bakery Products Product Segment by Type 2.4.1 United States Frozen Bakery Products Sales (Kilogram) and Growth by Types (2012, 2016 and 2022) 2.4.2 United States Frozen Bakery Products Sales (Kilogram) and Market Share by Types (2012-2017) 2.4.3 United States Frozen Bakery Products Revenue (Million USD) and Market Share by Types (2012-2017) 2.4.4 United States Frozen Bakery Products Price (USD/Kilogram) by Type (2012-2017) 3.2 Global Frozen Bakery Products Product Segment by Application 3.2.1 Global Frozen Bakery Products Sales (Kilogram) and CGAR (%) by Applications (2012, 2016 and 2022) 3.2.2 Global Frozen Bakery Products Sales (Kilogram) and Market Share (%) by Applications (2012-2017) 3.3 United States Frozen Bakery Products Product Segment by Application 3.3.1 United States Frozen Bakery Products Sales (Kilogram) and CGAR (%) by Applications (2012, 2016 and 2022) 3.3.2 United States Frozen Bakery Products Sales (Kilogram) and Market Share (%) by Applications (2012-2017) 4 Frozen Bakery Products Market Status and Outlook by Regions 4.1 Global Market Status and Outlook by Regions 4.1.1 Global Frozen Bakery Products Market Size and CAGR by Regions (2012, 2016 and 2022) 4.1.2 North America 4.1.3 Asia-Pacific 4.1.4 Europe 4.1.5 South America 4.1.6 Middle East and Africa 4.1.7 United States 4.2 Global Frozen Bakery Products Sales and Revenue by Regions 4.2.1 Global Frozen Bakery Products Sales (Kilogram) and Market Share (%) by Regions (2012-2017) 4.2.2 Global Frozen Bakery Products Revenue (Million USD) and Market Share (%) by Regions (2012-2017) 4.2.3 Global Frozen Bakery Products Sales (Kilogram), Revenue (Million USD), Price (USD/Kilogram) and Gross Margin (%) (2012-2017) 4.2.4 North America Frozen Bakery Products Sales (Kilogram), Revenue (Million USD), Price (USD/Kilogram) and Gross Margin (%) (2012-2017) 4.2.5 Europe Frozen Bakery Products Sales (Kilogram), Revenue (Million USD), Price (USD/Kilogram) and Gross Margin (%) (2012-2017) 4.2.6 Asia-Pacific Frozen Bakery Products Sales (Kilogram), Revenue (Million USD), Price (USD/Kilogram) and Gross Margin (%) (2012-2017) 4.2.7 South America Frozen Bakery Products Sales (Kilogram), Revenue (Million USD), Price (USD/Kilogram) and Gross Margin (2012-2017) 4.2.8 Middle East and Africa Frozen Bakery Products Sales (Kilogram), Revenue (Million USD), Price (USD/Kilogram) and Gross Margin (%) (2012-2017) 4.2.9 United States Frozen Bakery Products Sales (Kilogram), Revenue (Million USD), Price (USD/Kilogram) and Gross Margin (2012-2017) 5 Global Frozen Bakery Products Market Competition by Players/Manufacturers 5.1 Global Frozen Bakery Products Sales (Kilogram) and Market Share by Players (2012-2017) 5.2 Global Frozen Bakery Products Revenue (Million USD) and Share by Players (2012-2017) 5.3 Global Frozen Bakery Products Average Price (USD/Kilogram) by Players (2012-2017) 5.4 Players Frozen Bakery Products Manufacturing Base Distribution, Sales Area, Product Types 5.5 Frozen Bakery Products Market Competitive Situation and Trends 5.5.1 Frozen Bakery Products Market Concentration Rate 5.5.2 Global Frozen Bakery Products Market Share (%) of Top 3 and Top 5 Players 5.5.3 Mergers & Acquisitions, Expansion For more information or any query mail at sales@wiseguyreports.com ABOUT US: Wise Guy Reports is part of the Wise Guy Consultants Pvt. Ltd. and offers premium progressive statistical surveying, market research reports, analysis & forecast data for industries and governments around the globe. Wise Guy Reports features an exhaustive list of market research reports from hundreds of publishers worldwide. We boast a database spanning virtually every market category and an even more comprehensive collection of rmaket research reports under these categories and sub-categories. For more information, please visit https://www.wiseguyreports.com


News Article | October 13, 2016
Site: www.theguardian.com

Tesco is running short of stocks of a range of household brands from Marmite to Comfort fabric conditioner after a row with its major supplier Unilever. It is understood that Unilever has halted deliveries to Tesco after a dispute over price, and several famous brands are currently unavailable from the supermarket chain’s website. The food, toiletries and household goods supplier has been attempting to raise prices across a wide range of goods by about 10%, blaming the falling value of the pound against the euro and the dollar. The row will be embarrassing for the supermarket’s chief executive, Dave Lewis, who previously held a senior role at Unilever. It also comes after Tesco made sweeping changes to the way its buyers deal with suppliers after strong criticism from the industry watchdog, the Grocery Code Adjudicator. A Tesco spokesperson said: “We are experiencing availability issues on a number of Unilever products. We always work to ensure customers get the best possible prices and we hope to have this issue resolved soon.” Unilever is one of the UK’s biggest suppliers of branded foods and household goods and the dispute could have serious consequences for both sides. In different areas of the country a number of Unilever brands have sold out. They include Persil, Surf, Dove, Comfort, Ben & Jerry’s ice cream, Elmlea, Colman’s, Helmann’s, Marmite, Knorr, Bertolli, Flora, Comfort and Pot Noodle. It is understood that Unilever has approached a number of the major retailers in an attempt to increase prices. One well-informed source said: “Unilever is using Brexit as an excuse to raise prices, even on products that are made in the UK.” Bryan Roberts, a retail analyst at TCC Global, said Unilever’s attempt to increase prices was not surprising and reflected attempts by a large number of supermarket suppliers to offset cost increases. He suggested there were likely to be more disputes between retailers and suppliers. “A lot of suppliers are seeking to pass on price increases to retailers but in the current environment retailers are increasingly reluctant to take it. They want to keep prices as low as they can to increase their affordability against the competition.” It emerged earlier this week that confidence in the food and drink industry is increasingly fragile since the upheaval caused by the EU referendum result. Ged Futter, a retail consultant at IR Solutions, which advises suppliers on how to negotiate with retailers, said the fall in the value of the pound was having a huge impact on those importing goods. “A lot of suppliers have seen costs go up significantly because of currency. Some are covered until the end of the year but not beyond. Retailers are saying they can’t pass cost increases on to their shoppers but that has to happen, or they are not going to have any suppliers left,” he said. Details of the standoff between Tesco and Unilever emerged just a few hours after Justin King, a former boss of Sainsbury’s, warned that supermarkets could not absorb cost increases caused by the falling pound and that price rises were inevitable. Serious disputes over price are not that unusual in the grocery sector. Roberts said it was usually the retailer who ended up backing down because shoppers demanded certain brands. In 2011, Tesco refused to stock a number of Premier Foods’ brands, including Oxo and Ambrosia, after the supplier tried to pass on a 14% increase in costs. The two fell out the previous year over Hovis when Premier, citing soaring wheat prices, tried to raise the price of its loaves. Unilever declined to comment on the dispute with Tesco.


News Article | November 18, 2016
Site: www.theguardian.com

Pigs in blankets might have to be rationed round the Christmas dinner table next month after the price of pork hit a two-year high. Analysts are reporting an 18% increase in the wholesale price of pork, with the surge expected to have a knock-on effect on the price of bacon and sausages in supermarkets in the coming weeks. “Pork prices in the UK have risen very fast,” said Rabobank analyst Albert Vernooij. “Setting [shop] prices is up to the retailers but at a certain point you would expect higher [wholesale] prices will be passed on to consumers. There is always a delay.” Vernooij said Britain only produces just over half of the pork it consumes. Food manufacturers and retailers are facing multiple problems as they manage the impact of commodity price swings as well as the weakness of sterling following the Brexit vote. According to official figures the price of materials and fuels for manufacturers rose 12.2% in the year to October 2016. There is also evidence firms are passing the pain on to their customers with factory gate prices up 2.1% on the year. The tough conditions are creating friction, with last month’s “Marmitegate” stand-off between Tesco and Unilever the first to spill into the public domain as the supermarket resisted the manufacturer’s attempt to push through price increases. Tesco chief executive Dave Lewis said the retailer is already seeing inflation in certain food categories, particularly pork, but is only willing to tolerate pricing increases from suppliers faced with “legitimate” cost pressures. According to consultancy Mintec, the price of “pig deadweight” – essentially the price farmers receive for slaughtered pigs – is 18% higher than a year ago, at around £150 per 100kg. “Low pork prices earlier in the year resulted in many UK farmers reducing the size of their herds,” said Mintec analyst Emma Smith. “As a result, slaughter levels in the UK were down in September, at 910,500 head – 3% below the same period last year.” The surge in the wholesale price will not affect the cost of British favourites such as bacon, sausages and sausage rolls in a uniform way, said Vernooij. Britons’ love of bacon means manufacturers have to import loin to satisfy demand, whereas there is sufficient domestic supply of the belly and shoulder cuts used to make sausages. Last week, Premier Foods, the group behind brands such as Mr Kipling and Cadbury cakes, signalled price rises were on the horizon as the price of butter soared 80%, while wheat and edible oils were up 40% due to a combination of commodity price rises and currency exchange rate pressure. Its chief executive Gavin Darby said the price of sugar had also risen by 20% to 30%.


News Article | February 13, 2017
Site: www.theguardian.com

UK employers are increasingly struggling to fill jobs in shops, factories and hospitals according to a new report that suggests the shortfall may be down to fewer EU migrants seeking work in the UK in the wake of the Brexit vote. Company bosses are reporting labour and skills shortages throughout the food supply chain as well as in sectors such as manufacturing, healthcare and hospitality, according to the latest Labour Market Outlook from the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD) and The Adecco Group, which polls more than 1,000 employers. One in four also had evidence that the EU nationals they employed were considering either leaving their organisation or the UK in 2017. Gerwyn Davies, labour market adviser at CIPD, which represents human resources professionals, pointed to official data which showed that the growth in the number of non-UK EU nationals in employment had slowed in recent months. “This is creating significant recruitment challenges in sectors that have historically relied on non-UK labour to fill roles,” he said. “With skills and labour shortages set to continue, there’s a risk that many vacancies will be left unfilled which could act as a brake on output growth in the UK in the years ahead.” The most recent labour market data from the Office for National Statistics (ONS) showed that while EU nationals were still arriving in the UK, they were doing so in smaller numbers than in the past. Growth in the number of non-UK nationals from the European Union working in the UK had almost halved from an average of more than 60,000 per quarter in the nine months to June 2016 to just 30,000 in the three months to September 2016. The figures needed to be treated with caution though, warned Davies as they had not been seasonally adjusted. At the end of last year industry groups representing the major supermarkets and food manufacturers warned that EU workers provided “an essential reservoir of skilled, semi-skilled and unskilled labour” and without them food prices would rise. The open letter to the government was signed by 30 food and drink industry bodies, including the Food and Drink Federation, which represents major suppliers, including Marmite maker Unilever and Mr Kipling owner Premier Foods; the British Retail Consortium, which counts Tesco, Sainsbury’s, Asda and Morrisons among its members, and the National Farmers Union. Employment agencies have warned that the UK’s food industry is facing the worst labour shortage for at least 12 years. The public sector is expected to be severely impacted by the risk of a drop in EU labour, with 43% of education and 49% of healthcare sector employers surveyed in the Labour Market Outlook saying they believed EU migrants among their workforce were considering leaving. The survey found that despite the acuteness of the issue, more than a quarter of employers did not actually know how many EU nationals they had in their workforce. “Employers need to start collecting data about their workforce and review their approach to workforce development and training to avoid a squeeze on skills and the workforce,” continued Davies. “Employers in sectors like retail, hospitality and care, will need to work much harder to attract candidates and combat labour shortages by improving the attractiveness of their jobs … and improving pay and employment conditions where possible.” Another new survey, the London Employment Monitor, also highlights a 29% drop in professionals job hunting in the City last month, as high fliers look for jobs in other financial centres. “Many of our non-British clients are choosing to return home, or seeking opportunities elsewhere in Europe”, said Hakan Enver,operations director, at Morgan McKinley Financial Services. “People wanting to get ahead of the threat of having their right to work revoked is understandable, but is a huge loss for the City”. January is a key month for job hunting with vacancies surging 81% in January from the previous month. But that compared with a surge of 115% a year ago. “Until the terms of Brexit are known and put in motion, the jobs market will remain cautious,” added Enver.


Frozen bakery food products are products that need to be preserved at subzero temperatures, in order to preserve the quality and shelf-life for longer usage. The current changing lifestyle, where people are resorting to easy food choices is the key factor which has wide opened the way for frozen bakery food products market. Global Frozen Bakery Food Products market is mainly driven by a number of people opting for frozen products instead of regular products for their meal. Frozen bakery products also feature reasonable prices, better quality, environment friendly manufacturing process, and convenient, these are also some of the factors adding up to driving the market growth. But, the market growth can be hindered because of inclination towards freshly baked products. Enquire more about the report at "http://www.marketdataforecast.com/market-reports/global-frozen-bakery-products-market-1524/inquire" Some of the major companies operating in the market are Associated British Foods plc , ARYZTA AG, Lantmannen Unibake International, EUROPASTRY, SA, General Mills, Inc., and Kellogg Company , Premier Foods Plc, Vandemoortele NV, ConAgra Foods, Inc. and Grupo Bimbo S.A.B. de C.V. The Frozen Bakery Products Market study offers the following deliverables: Checkout other related studies in the Supplements Segment: Market Data Forecast is a firm working in the area of market research and business intelligence. With rich experience in research across various business domains, we cater to the needs of both individual and corporate clients. Our analyst team comprises expert professionals in market research, who with their collective knowledge and skillset dedicatedly serve clients from various industries and regions.


News Article | December 5, 2016
Site: www.prnewswire.co.uk

The report "Frozen Bakery Products Market by Type (Breads, Pizza Crusts, Cakes & Pastries), Distribution Channel (Artisan Bakers, Retail, Catering & Industrial), and Technology (Raw Products, Ready-to-Bake, Ready Baked & Frozen) - Global Forecast to 2022", published by MarketsandMarkets, the market is projected to reach a value of USD 23.48 Billion by 2022 at a CAGR of 7.9% from 2016. Browse 77 market data Tables and 52 Figures spread through 152 Pages and in-depth TOC on "Frozen Bakery Products Market" Early buyers will receive 10% customization on this report. Increase in demand for convenient food products and drive for greater taste, safety, and consistency are the major factors driving the global frozen bakery products market. The high growth potential in emerging markets such as India and China, and untapped regions provide new growth opportunities for the players in the frozen bakery products market. Cakes & pastries projected to be the fastest-growing segment, by type, from 2016 to 2022 The cakes & pastries segment is projected to grow at the highest CAGR from 2016 to 2022. Increase in exports and imports of frozen cakes & pastries from dominant regions, such as North America and Europe, are the factors behind its continuously increasing market share in other parts of the world. In addition, specialty cakes & pastries with high starch-gluten ratio and low-protein wheat are gaining huge popularity, and are expected to contribute a commendable market revenue in 2022. Retail distribution channel segment expected to continue its dominance over the forecast period and to grow at a considerable CAGR between 2016 and 2022 Retail is the most effective media of targeting the maximum number of customers possible, and currently holds the largest market share of the frozen bakery products market. Changing consumption patterns, willingness and ability of customers to spend and try new products are the key factors driving the growth of the retail channel. Moreover, the increasing number of super markets and hyper markets is moderately replacing fresh bread products made by chain bakeries and artisan bakers. Asia-Pacific expected to show growth potential in the frozen bakery products market There is a high-growth potential for frozen bakery products in the Asia-Pacific region where the emerging economies, such as China and India, are located. The emerging economies have considerable potential customers that are adopting the ready-to-cook and more convenient food options. China, in particular, is the largest country to hold the maximum share in the Frozen Bakery Products Market due to the rapid urbanization and changing consumption pattern of consumers in this country. This report includes a study of marketing and development strategies, along with the product portfolios of leading companies. The leading companies in the global Frozen Bakery Products Market include Grupo Bimbo S.A.B. de C.V. (Mexico), Aryzta AG (Switzerland), Lantmannen Unibake International (Denmark), Europastry, S.A. (Spain), General Mills Inc. (U.S.), and Kellogg Company (U.S.). Other players include Conagra Brands, Inc. (U.S.), Premier Foods plc (U.K.), Associated British Foods plc (U.K.), and Vandemoortele NV (Belgium). Fillings & Toppings Market by Type (Fondants, Creams, Pastes & Variegates, Fruits & Nuts, Sprinkles), Application (Bakery, Confectionery), Flavor (Fruit, Chocolate), Raw Material (Sweeteners, Cocoa), and Form (Solid, Liquid) - Global Forecasts to 2022 http://www.marketsandmarkets.com/Market-Reports/filling-topping-market-255827338.html Functional Flours Market by Type (Pre-cooked Flour, Specialty Flour), Application (Bakery, Soups & Sauces, R.T.E Products), Source (Cereals and Legumes), and Region (North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific, Rest of the World) - Global Forecast to 2022 http://www.marketsandmarkets.com/Market-Reports/functional-flour-market-206860140.html MarketsandMarkets is the largest market research firm worldwide in terms of annually published premium market research reports. Serving 1700 global fortune enterprises with more than 1200 premium studies in a year, M&M is catering to a multitude of clients across 8 different industrial verticals. We specialize in consulting assignments and business research across high growth markets, cutting edge technologies and newer applications. Our 850 fulltime analyst and SMEs at MarketsandMarkets are tracking global high growth markets following the "Growth Engagement Model - GEM". The GEM aims at proactive collaboration with the clients to identify new opportunities, identify most important customers, write "Attack, avoid and defend" strategies, identify sources of incremental revenues for both the company and its competitors. M&M's flagship competitive intelligence and market research platform, "RT" connects over 200,000 markets and entire value chains for deeper understanding of the unmet insights along with market sizing and forecasts of niche markets. The new included chapters on Methodology and Benchmarking presented with high quality analytical infographics in our reports gives complete visibility of how the numbers have been arrived and defend the accuracy of the numbers. 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Future Market Insights delivers key insights on the global ready-to-eat food products market in a new publication titled, “Ready-to-eat Food Market: Global Industry Analysis and Opportunity Assessment, 2016–2026”. In terms of value, the global ready-to-eat food products market is projected to register a healthy CAGR of 7.2% during the forecast period (2016–2026). In the report, Future Market Insights analyses the global ready-to-eat food products market performance and gives information on the key factors and trends impacting the market. Analysts at Future Market Insights predict that a rise in the number of working women, a growing millennial population, and on-the-go consumption habits are factors likely to boost the growth of the global ready-to-eat food products market during the forecast period. “A large number of innovations in packaging technology such as introduction of advanced microwave technology have shifted the focus towards consumption of packaged foods in developed countries such as the U.S., Germany, and Russia; and this in turn has led to a significant increase in the demand for ready-to-eat food products globally.”Analyst, Future Market Insights. However, unhealthy substitutes and low quality and taste coupled with an increasing shift towards a healthier lifestyle is likely to hinder market growth in the coming years. The global ready-to-eat food products market is segmented on the basis of Product Type (Meat/Poultry, Cereal Based, Vegetable Based, Others), Packaging (Canned, Frozen or Chilled, Retort, Others), and Distribution Channel (Hypermarket/Supermarket, Convenience/Departmental Store, Specialty Store, Online Store, Others). The Meat/Poultry product type segment is estimated to be valued at US$ 44.54 Bn in 2016, and is likely to expand at a CAGR of 7.7% over the forecast period. This segment is expected to dominate the market in terms of value from 2016 to 2026 The Frozen or Chilled packaging segment is estimated to account for 40.0% value share by the end of 2016. This segment is expected to account for a major market share in terms of value over the forecast period The Hypermarket/Supermarket distribution channel segment is estimated to be valued at US$ 38.66 Bn by the end of 2016, which is expected to expand at a CAGR of 5.7% over the forecast period to be valued at US$ 67.08 Bn by the end of 2026. Sales of ready-to-eat food products through the Hypermarket/Supermarket channel are expected to support segment growth over the forecast period The global ready-to-eat food products market is segmented into seven key regions – North America, Latin America, Western Europe, Eastern Europe, Asia Pacific excluding Japan (APEJ), Middle East & Africa (MEA), and Japan. Asia Pacific excluding Japan (APEJ), Eastern Europe, and North America are expected to register high growth rates between 2016 and 2026. The ready-to-eat food products market in North America is expected to register significant value over the forecast period owing to increasing per capita consumption of ready-to-eat food in this region. By the end of 2016, the North America market is estimated to be valued at US$ 39.02 Bn, which is expected to expand at a CAGR of 7.3% over the forecast period to be valued at US$ 78.73 Bn by the end of 2026. The Asia Pacific market is estimated to be valued at US$ 17.73 Bn by the end of 2016, which is expected to expand at a CAGR of 8.4% over the forecast period to be valued at US$ 39.78 Bn by the end of 2026. The report profiles the leading companies operating in the global ready-to-eat food products market. The companies profiled in the report are Nomad Foods Ltd., Bakkavor Foods Ltd., General Mills Inc., McCain Foods, Premier Foods Group Ltd., 2 Sisters Food Group, Greencore Group Plc., Orkla ASA, ConAgra Foods, Inc., and ITC Limited.

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