Precicast Bilbao

Barakaldo, Spain

Precicast Bilbao

Barakaldo, Spain

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Rahimian M.,IMDEA Madrid Institute for Advanced Studies | Milenkovic S.,IMDEA Madrid Institute for Advanced Studies | Maestro L.,Precicast Bilbao | De Azua A.E.R.,Precicast Bilbao | Sabirov I.,IMDEA Madrid Institute for Advanced Studies
Metallurgical and Materials Transactions A: Physical Metallurgy and Materials Science | Year: 2015

Development of investment casting process has been a challenge for manufacturers of complex shape parts. Numerous experimental casting trials are typically carried out to determine the optimum casting parameters for fabrication of high-quality products. In this work, it is demonstrated that physical simulation of investment casting can successfully predict microstructure and hardness in as-cast complex shape parts. The physical simulation tool consists of a thermal model and melting/solidification experiments in thermo-mechanical simulator. The thermal model is employed to predict local cooling rate during solidification at each point of a casting. Melting/solidification experiments are carried out under controlled cooling rates estimated by the thermal model. Microstructural and mechanical characterization of the solidified specimens is performed; the obtained results predict the local microstructure and mechanical properties of the casting. This concept is applied to investment casting of complex shape nozzle guide vanes from Mar-M247 Ni-based superalloy. Experimental casting trials are performed and the outcomes of physical simulation tool are validated against experimental results. It is shown that phase composition, secondary dendrite arm spacing, grain size, γ/γ′ eutectic size and volume fraction, size and shape of carbide particles, and local microhardness can be predicted at each point of the casting via physical simulation. © 2015, The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society and ASM International.


Rahimian M.,IMDEA Madrid Institute for Advanced Studies | Milenkovic S.,IMDEA Madrid Institute for Advanced Studies | Maestro L.,Precicast Bilbao | Eguidazu Ruiz De Azua A.,Precicast Bilbao | Sabirov I.,IMDEA Madrid Institute for Advanced Studies
Materials and Design | Year: 2015

Development of investment casting process has been always a challenge for manufacturers of complex shape parts with thin elements. Particularly, misruns often occur in the as-cast complex shape parts due to the formation of solid skin by freezing of melt in contact with colder ceramic mould. This work presents a new tool for physical simulation of skin formation during investment casting. Special ceramic tubes are designed and fabricated from the material used for the manufacturing of ceramic moulds for investment casting. Melting/solidification experiments are carried out in the thermo-mechanical simulator, where the melt is contained in the ceramic tube, which is heated to the temperature of ceramic mould in investment casting. Detailed microstructural characterization of the solidified specimens is performed; the obtained results predict the thickness of skin and its microstructure. This concept is applied to investment casting of complex shape nozzle guide vanes from the Mar-M247 Ni-based superalloy. Experimental casting trials are performed, and the outcomes of physical simulation tool are validated against experimental results. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.


Anglada E.,Tecnalia | Melendez A.,Tecnalia | Maestro L.,Precicast Bilbao | Domiguez I.,Precicast Bilbao
Procedia Engineering | Year: 2013

This paper presents the adjustment process of a simulation model to improve the correlation between simulation results and parts industrially manufactured. It includes the data registration at foundry plant, the preliminary set-up of the model and the later adjustment process to reach a correlation level according to the industrial necessities. The adjustment has been performed by means of inverse modelling. This technique uses thermal histories experimentally registered as base, and modifies the material properties and boundary conditions used in simulation until reaching a good correlation between numerical simulated cooling curves and they registered experimentally. The adjustment has been also focused on the shrinkage defects. The simulation model is a FEM model developed in commercial software specifically focused on metal casting simulation. The case of study is an investment casting process, vacuum poured, of a nickel base superalloy designated Hastelloy X. Usual in the manufacture of components for aeronautical turbines. © 2013 The Authors.


Anglada E.,Tecnalia | Melendez A.,Tecnalia | Maestro L.,Precicast Bilbao | Dominguez I.,Precicast Bilbao
Materials Science Forum | Year: 2014

The achievement of reliable simulations, in the case of complex processes as is the investment casting, is not a trivial task. Their accuracy is significantly related with the knowledge of the material properties and boundary conditions involved, but the estimation of these values usually is highly complex. One helpful option to try to avoid these difficulties is the use of inverse modelling techniques, where experimental temperature measurements are used as base to correlate the simulation models. The research presented hereafter corresponds to the correlation of a finite element model of the investment casting process of two nickel base superalloys, Hastelloy X and Inconel 718. The simulation model has been developed in a commercial software focused specifically on metal casting simulation. The experimental measurements used as base for the adjustment, have been performed at industrial facilities. The methodology employed combines the use of an automatic tool for model correlation with the manual adjustment guided by the researchers. Results obtained present a good agreement between simulation and experimental measurements, according to the industrial necessities. The model obtained is valid for the two studied cases with the only difference of the alloy material properties. The values obtained for the adjusted parameters in both cases are reasonable compared with bibliographic values. These two circumstances suggest that the obtained correlation is appropriate and no overfitting problems exist on it. © (2014) Trans Tech Publications, Switzerland.

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