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LONDON, UK / ACCESSWIRE / April 20, 2017 / Active Wall St. announces the list of stocks for today's research reports. Pre-market the Active Wall St. team provides the technical coverage impacting selected stocks trading on the Toronto Exchange and belonging under the Insurance industry. Companies recently under review include Power Corp. of Canada, Sun Life Financial, Industrial Alliance Insurance and Financial Services, and Genworth MI Canada. Get all of our free research reports by signing up at: http://www.activewallst.com/register/. On Wednesday, April 19, 2017, at the end of trading session, the Toronto Exchange Composite index ended the day at 15,552.88, 0.45% lower, with a total volume of 360,854,546 shares. Additionally, the Financials index was slightly down by 0.15%, ending the session at 285.08. Active Wall St. has initiated research reports on the following equities: Power Corporation of Canada (TSX: POW), Sun Life Financial Inc. (TSX: SLF), Industrial Alliance Insurance and Financial Services Inc. (TSX: IAG), and Genworth MI Canada Inc. (TSX: MIC). Register with us now for your free membership and research reports at: http://www.activewallst.com/register/. Montréal, Canada-based Power Corp. of Canada's stock edged 0.07% lower, to finish Wednesday's session at $30.72 with a total volume of 507,977 shares traded. Power Corp. of Canada's shares have advanced 2.88% in the past three months. The Company's shares are trading above its 200-day moving average. Power Corp. of Canada's 50-day moving average of $31.52 is above its 200-day moving average of $30.33. Shares of the Company, which operates as a diversified international management and holding company with interests primarily in the financial services, communications, and other business sectors in Canada, the US, and Europe, are trading at a PE ratio of 13.22. See our research report on POW.TO at: http://www.activewallst.com/register/. On Wednesday, shares in Toronto, Canada headquartered Sun Life Financial Inc. recorded a trading volume of 885,243 shares. The stock ended the day 0.36% higher at $47.12. Sun Life Financial's stock has gained 9.99% in the past one year. The Company's shares are trading below its 50-day and 200-day moving averages. The stock's 200-day moving average of $49.26 is above its 50-day moving average of $48.38. Shares of the Company, which provides protection and wealth products and services to individuals, businesses, and institutions worldwide, are trading at PE ratio of 11.69. The complimentary research report on SLF.TO at: http://www.activewallst.com/register/. Industrial Alliance Insurance and Financial Services Inc. (TSX: IAG) On Wednesday, shares in Quebec City, Canada headquartered Industrial Alliance Insurance and Financial Services Inc. ended the session 0.09% higher at $55.32 with a total volume of 109,470 shares traded. Industrial Alliance Insurance and Financial Services' shares have gained 0.53% in the last three months and 33.88% in the previous one year. The stock is trading above its 200-day moving average. Furthermore, the stock's 50-day moving average of $57.02 is greater than its 200-day moving average of $54.93. Shares of Industrial Alliance Insurance and Financial Services, which provides various life and health insurance products in Canada, are trading at a PE ratio of 10.66. Register for free and access the latest research report on IAG.TO at: http://www.activewallst.com/register/. Oakville, Canada headquartered Genworth MI Canada Inc.'s stock closed the day 0.23% higher at $35.12. The stock recorded a trading volume of 162,532 shares. Genworth MI Canada's shares have gained 7.33% in the last three months and 8.53% in the past one year. The company's shares are trading above their 200-day moving average. Moreover, the stock's 50-day moving average of $37.18 is greater than its 200-day moving average of $33.84. Shares of the Company, which through its subsidiaries, operates as a private residential mortgage insurer in Canada, are trading at a PE ratio of 7.74. Get free access to your research report on MIC.TO at: http://www.activewallst.com/register/. Active Wall Street (AWS) produces regular sponsored and non-sponsored reports, articles, stock market blogs, and popular investment newsletters covering equities listed on NYSE and NASDAQ and micro-cap stocks. AWS has two distinct and independent departments. One department produces non-sponsored analyst certified content generally in the form of press releases, articles and reports covering equities listed on NYSE and NASDAQ and the other produces sponsored content (in most cases not reviewed by a registered analyst), which typically consists of compensated investment newsletters, articles and reports covering listed stocks and micro-caps. Such sponsored content is outside the scope of procedures detailed below. AWS has not been compensated; directly or indirectly; for producing or publishing this document. The non-sponsored content contained herein has been prepared by a writer (the "Author") and is fact checked and reviewed by a third party research service company (the "Reviewer") represented by a credentialed financial analyst [for further information on analyst credentials, please email info@activewallst.com. Rohit Tuli, a CFA® charterholder (the "Sponsor"), provides necessary guidance in preparing the document templates. The Reviewer has reviewed and revised the content, as necessary, based on publicly available information which is believed to be reliable. Content is researched, written and reviewed on a reasonable-effort basis. The Reviewer has not performed any independent investigations or forensic audits to validate the information herein. The Reviewer has only independently reviewed the information provided by the Author according to the procedures outlined by AWS. AWS is not entitled to veto or interfere in the application of such procedures by the third-party research service company to the articles, documents or reports, as the case may be. Unless otherwise noted, any content outside of this document has no association with the Author or the Reviewer in any way. AWS, the Author, and the Reviewer are not responsible for any error which may be occasioned at the time of printing of this document or any error, mistake or shortcoming. No liability is accepted whatsoever for any direct, indirect or consequential loss arising from the use of this document. AWS, the Author, and the Reviewer expressly disclaim any fiduciary responsibility or liability for any consequences, financial or otherwise arising from any reliance placed on the information in this document. Additionally, AWS, the Author, and the Reviewer do not (1) guarantee the accuracy, timeliness, completeness or correct sequencing of the information, or (2) warrant any results from use of the information. The included information is subject to change without notice. This document is not intended as an offering, recommendation, or a solicitation of an offer to buy or sell the securities mentioned or discussed, and is to be used for informational purposes only. Please read all associated disclosures and disclaimers in full before investing. Neither AWS nor any party affiliated with us is a registered investment adviser or broker-dealer with any agency or in any jurisdiction whatsoever. To download our report(s), read our disclosures, or for more information, visit http://www.activewallst.com/disclaimer/. For any questions, inquiries, or comments reach out to us directly. If you're a company we are covering and wish to no longer feature on our coverage list contact us via email and/or phone between 09:30 EDT to 16:00 EDT from Monday to Friday at: CFA® and Chartered Financial Analyst® are registered trademarks owned by CFA Institute. LONDON, UK / ACCESSWIRE / April 20, 2017 / Active Wall St. announces the list of stocks for today's research reports. Pre-market the Active Wall St. team provides the technical coverage impacting selected stocks trading on the Toronto Exchange and belonging under the Insurance industry. Companies recently under review include Power Corp. of Canada, Sun Life Financial, Industrial Alliance Insurance and Financial Services, and Genworth MI Canada. Get all of our free research reports by signing up at: http://www.activewallst.com/register/. On Wednesday, April 19, 2017, at the end of trading session, the Toronto Exchange Composite index ended the day at 15,552.88, 0.45% lower, with a total volume of 360,854,546 shares. Additionally, the Financials index was slightly down by 0.15%, ending the session at 285.08. Active Wall St. has initiated research reports on the following equities: Power Corporation of Canada (TSX: POW), Sun Life Financial Inc. (TSX: SLF), Industrial Alliance Insurance and Financial Services Inc. (TSX: IAG), and Genworth MI Canada Inc. (TSX: MIC). Register with us now for your free membership and research reports at: http://www.activewallst.com/register/. Montréal, Canada-based Power Corp. of Canada's stock edged 0.07% lower, to finish Wednesday's session at $30.72 with a total volume of 507,977 shares traded. Power Corp. of Canada's shares have advanced 2.88% in the past three months. The Company's shares are trading above its 200-day moving average. Power Corp. of Canada's 50-day moving average of $31.52 is above its 200-day moving average of $30.33. Shares of the Company, which operates as a diversified international management and holding company with interests primarily in the financial services, communications, and other business sectors in Canada, the US, and Europe, are trading at a PE ratio of 13.22. See our research report on POW.TO at: http://www.activewallst.com/register/. On Wednesday, shares in Toronto, Canada headquartered Sun Life Financial Inc. recorded a trading volume of 885,243 shares. The stock ended the day 0.36% higher at $47.12. Sun Life Financial's stock has gained 9.99% in the past one year. The Company's shares are trading below its 50-day and 200-day moving averages. The stock's 200-day moving average of $49.26 is above its 50-day moving average of $48.38. Shares of the Company, which provides protection and wealth products and services to individuals, businesses, and institutions worldwide, are trading at PE ratio of 11.69. The complimentary research report on SLF.TO at: http://www.activewallst.com/register/. Industrial Alliance Insurance and Financial Services Inc. (TSX: IAG) On Wednesday, shares in Quebec City, Canada headquartered Industrial Alliance Insurance and Financial Services Inc. ended the session 0.09% higher at $55.32 with a total volume of 109,470 shares traded. Industrial Alliance Insurance and Financial Services' shares have gained 0.53% in the last three months and 33.88% in the previous one year. The stock is trading above its 200-day moving average. Furthermore, the stock's 50-day moving average of $57.02 is greater than its 200-day moving average of $54.93. Shares of Industrial Alliance Insurance and Financial Services, which provides various life and health insurance products in Canada, are trading at a PE ratio of 10.66. Register for free and access the latest research report on IAG.TO at: http://www.activewallst.com/register/. Oakville, Canada headquartered Genworth MI Canada Inc.'s stock closed the day 0.23% higher at $35.12. The stock recorded a trading volume of 162,532 shares. Genworth MI Canada's shares have gained 7.33% in the last three months and 8.53% in the past one year. The company's shares are trading above their 200-day moving average. Moreover, the stock's 50-day moving average of $37.18 is greater than its 200-day moving average of $33.84. Shares of the Company, which through its subsidiaries, operates as a private residential mortgage insurer in Canada, are trading at a PE ratio of 7.74. Get free access to your research report on MIC.TO at: http://www.activewallst.com/register/. Active Wall Street (AWS) produces regular sponsored and non-sponsored reports, articles, stock market blogs, and popular investment newsletters covering equities listed on NYSE and NASDAQ and micro-cap stocks. AWS has two distinct and independent departments. One department produces non-sponsored analyst certified content generally in the form of press releases, articles and reports covering equities listed on NYSE and NASDAQ and the other produces sponsored content (in most cases not reviewed by a registered analyst), which typically consists of compensated investment newsletters, articles and reports covering listed stocks and micro-caps. Such sponsored content is outside the scope of procedures detailed below. AWS has not been compensated; directly or indirectly; for producing or publishing this document. The non-sponsored content contained herein has been prepared by a writer (the "Author") and is fact checked and reviewed by a third party research service company (the "Reviewer") represented by a credentialed financial analyst [for further information on analyst credentials, please email info@activewallst.com. Rohit Tuli, a CFA® charterholder (the "Sponsor"), provides necessary guidance in preparing the document templates. The Reviewer has reviewed and revised the content, as necessary, based on publicly available information which is believed to be reliable. Content is researched, written and reviewed on a reasonable-effort basis. The Reviewer has not performed any independent investigations or forensic audits to validate the information herein. The Reviewer has only independently reviewed the information provided by the Author according to the procedures outlined by AWS. AWS is not entitled to veto or interfere in the application of such procedures by the third-party research service company to the articles, documents or reports, as the case may be. Unless otherwise noted, any content outside of this document has no association with the Author or the Reviewer in any way. AWS, the Author, and the Reviewer are not responsible for any error which may be occasioned at the time of printing of this document or any error, mistake or shortcoming. No liability is accepted whatsoever for any direct, indirect or consequential loss arising from the use of this document. AWS, the Author, and the Reviewer expressly disclaim any fiduciary responsibility or liability for any consequences, financial or otherwise arising from any reliance placed on the information in this document. Additionally, AWS, the Author, and the Reviewer do not (1) guarantee the accuracy, timeliness, completeness or correct sequencing of the information, or (2) warrant any results from use of the information. The included information is subject to change without notice. This document is not intended as an offering, recommendation, or a solicitation of an offer to buy or sell the securities mentioned or discussed, and is to be used for informational purposes only. Please read all associated disclosures and disclaimers in full before investing. Neither AWS nor any party affiliated with us is a registered investment adviser or broker-dealer with any agency or in any jurisdiction whatsoever. To download our report(s), read our disclosures, or for more information, visit http://www.activewallst.com/disclaimer/. For any questions, inquiries, or comments reach out to us directly. If you're a company we are covering and wish to no longer feature on our coverage list contact us via email and/or phone between 09:30 EDT to 16:00 EDT from Monday to Friday at: CFA® and Chartered Financial Analyst® are registered trademarks owned by CFA Institute.


LONDON, UK / ACCESSWIRE / April 20, 2017 / Active Wall St. announces the list of stocks for today's research reports. Pre-market the Active Wall St. team provides the technical coverage impacting selected stocks trading on the Toronto Exchange and belonging under the Insurance industry. Companies recently under review include Power Corp. of Canada, Sun Life Financial, Industrial Alliance Insurance and Financial Services, and Genworth MI Canada. Get all of our free research reports by signing up at: http://www.activewallst.com/register/. On Wednesday, April 19, 2017, at the end of trading session, the Toronto Exchange Composite index ended the day at 15,552.88, 0.45% lower, with a total volume of 360,854,546 shares. Additionally, the Financials index was slightly down by 0.15%, ending the session at 285.08. Active Wall St. has initiated research reports on the following equities: Power Corporation of Canada (TSX: POW), Sun Life Financial Inc. (TSX: SLF), Industrial Alliance Insurance and Financial Services Inc. (TSX: IAG), and Genworth MI Canada Inc. (TSX: MIC). Register with us now for your free membership and research reports at: http://www.activewallst.com/register/. Montréal, Canada-based Power Corp. of Canada's stock edged 0.07% lower, to finish Wednesday's session at $30.72 with a total volume of 507,977 shares traded. Power Corp. of Canada's shares have advanced 2.88% in the past three months. The Company's shares are trading above its 200-day moving average. Power Corp. of Canada's 50-day moving average of $31.52 is above its 200-day moving average of $30.33. Shares of the Company, which operates as a diversified international management and holding company with interests primarily in the financial services, communications, and other business sectors in Canada, the US, and Europe, are trading at a PE ratio of 13.22. See our research report on POW.TO at: http://www.activewallst.com/register/. On Wednesday, shares in Toronto, Canada headquartered Sun Life Financial Inc. recorded a trading volume of 885,243 shares. The stock ended the day 0.36% higher at $47.12. Sun Life Financial's stock has gained 9.99% in the past one year. The Company's shares are trading below its 50-day and 200-day moving averages. The stock's 200-day moving average of $49.26 is above its 50-day moving average of $48.38. Shares of the Company, which provides protection and wealth products and services to individuals, businesses, and institutions worldwide, are trading at PE ratio of 11.69. The complimentary research report on SLF.TO at: http://www.activewallst.com/register/. Industrial Alliance Insurance and Financial Services Inc. (TSX: IAG) On Wednesday, shares in Quebec City, Canada headquartered Industrial Alliance Insurance and Financial Services Inc. ended the session 0.09% higher at $55.32 with a total volume of 109,470 shares traded. Industrial Alliance Insurance and Financial Services' shares have gained 0.53% in the last three months and 33.88% in the previous one year. The stock is trading above its 200-day moving average. Furthermore, the stock's 50-day moving average of $57.02 is greater than its 200-day moving average of $54.93. Shares of Industrial Alliance Insurance and Financial Services, which provides various life and health insurance products in Canada, are trading at a PE ratio of 10.66. Register for free and access the latest research report on IAG.TO at: http://www.activewallst.com/register/. Oakville, Canada headquartered Genworth MI Canada Inc.'s stock closed the day 0.23% higher at $35.12. The stock recorded a trading volume of 162,532 shares. Genworth MI Canada's shares have gained 7.33% in the last three months and 8.53% in the past one year. The company's shares are trading above their 200-day moving average. Moreover, the stock's 50-day moving average of $37.18 is greater than its 200-day moving average of $33.84. Shares of the Company, which through its subsidiaries, operates as a private residential mortgage insurer in Canada, are trading at a PE ratio of 7.74. Get free access to your research report on MIC.TO at: http://www.activewallst.com/register/. Active Wall Street (AWS) produces regular sponsored and non-sponsored reports, articles, stock market blogs, and popular investment newsletters covering equities listed on NYSE and NASDAQ and micro-cap stocks. AWS has two distinct and independent departments. One department produces non-sponsored analyst certified content generally in the form of press releases, articles and reports covering equities listed on NYSE and NASDAQ and the other produces sponsored content (in most cases not reviewed by a registered analyst), which typically consists of compensated investment newsletters, articles and reports covering listed stocks and micro-caps. Such sponsored content is outside the scope of procedures detailed below. AWS has not been compensated; directly or indirectly; for producing or publishing this document. The non-sponsored content contained herein has been prepared by a writer (the "Author") and is fact checked and reviewed by a third party research service company (the "Reviewer") represented by a credentialed financial analyst [for further information on analyst credentials, please email [email protected]. Rohit Tuli, a CFA® charterholder (the "Sponsor"), provides necessary guidance in preparing the document templates. The Reviewer has reviewed and revised the content, as necessary, based on publicly available information which is believed to be reliable. Content is researched, written and reviewed on a reasonable-effort basis. The Reviewer has not performed any independent investigations or forensic audits to validate the information herein. The Reviewer has only independently reviewed the information provided by the Author according to the procedures outlined by AWS. AWS is not entitled to veto or interfere in the application of such procedures by the third-party research service company to the articles, documents or reports, as the case may be. Unless otherwise noted, any content outside of this document has no association with the Author or the Reviewer in any way. AWS, the Author, and the Reviewer are not responsible for any error which may be occasioned at the time of printing of this document or any error, mistake or shortcoming. No liability is accepted whatsoever for any direct, indirect or consequential loss arising from the use of this document. AWS, the Author, and the Reviewer expressly disclaim any fiduciary responsibility or liability for any consequences, financial or otherwise arising from any reliance placed on the information in this document. Additionally, AWS, the Author, and the Reviewer do not (1) guarantee the accuracy, timeliness, completeness or correct sequencing of the information, or (2) warrant any results from use of the information. The included information is subject to change without notice. This document is not intended as an offering, recommendation, or a solicitation of an offer to buy or sell the securities mentioned or discussed, and is to be used for informational purposes only. Please read all associated disclosures and disclaimers in full before investing. Neither AWS nor any party affiliated with us is a registered investment adviser or broker-dealer with any agency or in any jurisdiction whatsoever. To download our report(s), read our disclosures, or for more information, visit http://www.activewallst.com/disclaimer/. For any questions, inquiries, or comments reach out to us directly. If you're a company we are covering and wish to no longer feature on our coverage list contact us via email and/or phone between 09:30 EDT to 16:00 EDT from Monday to Friday at: CFA® and Chartered Financial Analyst® are registered trademarks owned by CFA Institute.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

MIAMI (April 17, 2017) – Jerry Blanton has been writing since he learned what letters stood for. Now, known for his vast experience writing books, Blanton was approached with a novel suggestion. With an interest in the idea and upon spending a significant amount of time researching the history of World War II, the author penned a powerful historical novel. “Nightmare Enemy, Dream Friend” chronicles the life of a German medical student who becomes a U-boat captain during World War II. Readers will be captivated as the book begins in a POW camp in Texas where the main character, Luther Weitgucker, has been incarcerated until World War II ends. Questions are answered and drama is heightened as the book flashes back to the beginning of the war. The author shares a different perspective on the amply documented war, reflecting on what it means to serve and do good during times of trouble, as the book portrays a man who does his best to keep his faith while waging a war he does not believe in. “Nightmare Enemy, Dream Friend” will appeal to a variety of readers as it capitalizes on action scenes, love interests and unique viewpoints of the Nazi era, while weaving biblical quotes and Christian references into the narrative. “Nightmare Enemy, Dream Friend” By: Jerry Blanton ISBN: 978-1-5320-0559-6 (sc); 978-1-5320-0561-9 (hc); 978-1-5320-0560-2 (e) Available on iUniverse, Amazon and Barnes and Noble About the author Jerry Blanton has taught high school English, managed a bookstore, served as an academic dean, and worked as a copywriter, proofreader, English professor, and writer. He has written more than 20 books that include mysteries, sci-fi novels, and poetry collections. Jerry currently resides in Homestead, Florida.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Beginning April 10, Hawai‘i artist and co-lead director of international street art celebration POW! WOW! Kamea Hadar will bring his artistic vision to the exterior of an O‘ahu affordable housing building. Inspired by the non-instrument Polynesian voyaging canoe Hōkūle‘a’s worldwide voyage and the Pacific Development Group’s commitment to sustainability, Hadar will paint a 14-story mural of Hawai‘i model Mahina Garcia as the Hawaiian moon goddess Hina. WHO: Kamea Hadar is a Hawai‘i-based artist who studied art in Paris, Madrid, and Tel Aviv. He is co-lead director of POW! WOW!, an annual week-long street art event founded in 2010, which brings together over a hundred local and international artists to create murals and other forms of art. Centered in the O‘ahu neighborhood of Kaka‘ako, POW! WOW! has expanded to include Taiwan, Israel, New Zealand, Japan, and other international cities. WHAT: During the month of April, Kamea Hadar will paint his largest mural to date, a representation of the Hawaiian moon goddess, Hina, on the side of an O‘ahu affordable housing development. The 165-foot tall depiction of Hina will be the state’s largest portrait mural and is inspired by Hōkūle‘a and Mālama Honua, the Hawaiian voyaging canoe's three-and-a-half year around-the-world voyage. WHY: The 14-story affordable housing unit that looks out onto Pearl Harbor was recently refurbished by Pacific Development Group with LEED Gold Certification. Hina was said to guide Polynesian voyagers with the moon and stars and has physical forms on sea and on land. She connects with Hōkūleʻa not only for her role in voyaging, but also with Mālama Honua’s and Pacific Development Group's message of, “caring for our Island Earth.” WHEN: Painting to take place from April 10th-May 10th For more information about the mural and sponsors, please click the link here.


News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.techtimes.com

Ticked Off! Here's What You Need To Know About Lyme Disease Fun times, tan lines, and the threat of tick-borne diseases. Apparently, this is what summer has got in store for us this year. As if blacklegged ticks in the country aren't already teeming with enough pathogens to make us go crazy, there's a new tick infection to add to the list — Powassan virus. Rumor has it, it's even worse than Lyme disease. Powassan or POW virus is a type of RNA flavivirus. It was first identified in Powassan, Ontario in 1958, thus its name. Similar to other mosquito- and tick-borne diseases — such as Lyme disease, West Nile, St. Louis encephalitis, and tick-borne encephalitis viruses — the infection is passed onto humans once they're bitten by the host of the virus. In the United States, there are currently two types of POW virus: • Lineage 1 POW virus — This type is associated with Ixodes cookei or Ixodes marxi ticks, which seldom bite humans. • Lineage 2 POW virus — Otherwise known as the deer tick virus, this type is linked to Ixodes scapularis ticks, the primary vector of Lyme disease, human anaplasmosis, and babesiosis. Over the last decade, there have been approximately 75 confirmed cases of POW virus disease reported to the U.S. Centers of Disease Control and Prevention. Although rare compared with other tick-borne diseases that are more prevalent and widespread in most parts of the United States, Powassan virus is stealthier and potentially fatal. Dr. Jennifer Lyons, chief of the Division of Neurological Infections and Inflammatory Diseases at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, cautions that almost anyone is at risk of getting Powassan, particularly newborns, the middle-aged, the elderly, and the immunocompromised. "About 15% of patients who are infected and have symptoms are not going survive. Of the survivors, at least 50% will have long-term neurological damage that is not going to resolve," Lyons, who is also an assistant professor of neurology at Harvard Medical School, told CNN. Unfortunately, most people who become infected with Powassan virus hardly ever show any signs, except for common flu-like symptoms, including fever, headache, vomiting, and seizures. The POW virus can reach the central nervous system and cause encephalitis (inflammation of the brain) and meningitis (inflammation of the membranes that surround the brain and spinal cord), according to the CDC. What's worse is that almost half of Powassan virus survivors are left with permanent neurological problems, such as recurrent headaches, muscle wasting, and memory decline, after a long and arduous battle with the infection. As of now, there is no definitive data as to how fast and how far the Powassan virus has spread, although new reported cases mostly come from the Northeast and northern areas of the Midwest — including Maine, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Wisconsin, and New York. The current CDC data are based on people who developed severe disease from the infection. "The bottom line is that we should be very scared of it because nobody is safe from it. And it could be that it is emerging and will explode over the next few years," Lyons warned. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


Two B-25 bombers associated with American servicemen missing in action from World War II were recently documented in the waters off Papua New Guinea by Project Recover--a collaborative team of marine scientists, archaeologists and volunteers who have combined efforts to locate aircraft and associated MIAs from World War II. The B-25 bomber is one of the most iconic airplanes of World War II, with nearly 10,000 of the famous warbirds conducting a variety of missions--from bombing to photo reconnaissance, to submarine patrols, and the historic raid over Tokyo. Present-day Papua New Guinea was the site of military action in the Pacific from January of 1942 to the end of the war in August 1945, with significant losses of aircraft and servicemen, some of whom have never been found. Project Recover is comprised of scientists from Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego and the College of Earth, Ocean, and Environment at the University of Delaware and members of the nonprofit organization BentProp, Limited. In February, a Project Recover team set out on a mission to map the seafloor in search of missing WWII aircraft, conduct an official archaeological survey of a known B-25 underwater wreck, and interview elders in villages in the immediate area. In its search of nearly 10 square kilometers, Project Recover located the debris field of a B-25 bomber that had been missing for over 70 years, associated with a crew of six MIAs. "People have this mental image of an airplane resting intact on the sea floor, but the reality is that most planes were often already damaged before crashing, or broke up upon impact. And, after soaking in the sea for decades, they are often unrecognizable to the untrained eye, often covered in corals and other sea-life," said Katy O'Connell, Project Recover's Executive Director, who is based at the University of Delaware's College of Earth, Ocean, and Environment. "Our use of advanced technologies, which led to the discovery of the B-25, enables us to accelerate and enhance the discovery and eventual recovery of our missing servicemen." Project Recover blends historical and archival data from multiple sources to narrow underwater search regions, then surveys the areas with scanning sonars, high definition imagers, advanced diving, and unmanned aerial and underwater robotic technologies. "The latest discovery is a result of the dedication and fervent efforts of everyone associated with Project Recover," said Dan Friedkin, chairman and CEO of The Friedkin Group and a member of the Project Recover team who provides private funding for the organization. "We are encouraged at the progress that is being made as our search efforts expand and remain committed to locating the resting places of all U.S. servicemen missing since World War II." In addition to searching for missing aircraft, Project Recover also conducts archaeological surveys of sites that are known, but not yet documented, like the site of a B-25 bomber that was discovered in Madang Harbor, Papua New Guinea. "While well known to locals and scuba enthusiasts for over 30 years, this particular B-25 had never been officially surveyed," said Andrew Pietruszka, a Scripps Oceanography scientist and Project Recover's underwater archaeologist. Of the six crew associated with the aircraft, five survived the crash but were taken prisoner by the Japanese. The remaining crewmember went down with the plane and is still listed as missing. "Our team of divers and scientists conducts site surveys to fully document the wreckage. That documentation can then be used by the U.S. government to correlate soldiers still missing in action with the aircraft site we discovered, and to evaluate that site for the possible recovery of remains," said Pietruszka. While the scientific focus of Project Recover is to conduct underwater searches and surveys, equally important are the historical accounts of crashes that are often part of local histories, passed from one generation to another. While speaking to village elders about the two B-25 cases, Project Recover team members were told about local terrestrial burial sites and an additional aircraft that had crashed on land. Project Recover provides detailed information about its missions and any discovered wrecks and possible links to airmen listed as missing in action to the Department of Defense's Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA). DPAA is tasked with recovery and repatriation efforts, including notification of the families of these MIAs. "Any find in the field is treated with the utmost care, respect and solemnity," said O'Connell. "There are still over 73,000 U.S. service members unaccounted for from World War II, leaving families with unanswered questions about their loved ones. We hope that our global efforts can help to bring closure and honor the service of the fallen." The mission to Papua New Guinea kicked off Project Recover's second year of formal operations and was made possible by a substantial financial commitment from Friedkin in 2016. Friedkin's continued support is helping sustain ongoing missions, while enabling the organization to innovate its technology and broaden its search and discovery efforts to focus areas around the world. In 2016, team members expanded operations, conducting missions in eight countries (England, New Caledonia, Palau, Saipan, the Solomon Islands, Tinian, and the U.S.) in search of over 20 aircraft and 100 service members still missing in action. Five aircraft were successfully identified and documented, with documentation submitted to DPAA. The missions also resulted in new leads, based on field research and personal accounts from locals, which will aid in planning for future missions. Among other missions around the world, Project Recover plans to return to Papua New Guinea later this year to focus on other cases of interest and further explore leads that developed from the February 2017 mission. Project Recover is a public-private partnership to enlist 21st century science and technology combined with in-depth archival and historical research in a quest to find the final underwater resting places of Americans missing in action since World War II. Established in 2012 with initial support from the Office of Naval Research and formalized in 2016 with private funding, Project Recover is a partnership among researchers at the University of Delaware's College of Earth, Ocean, and Environment, Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego, and The BentProp Project, Limited. Dan Friedkin is chairman and CEO of The Friedkin Group, a consortium of automotive, hospitality, entertainment, golf and adventure companies. These organizations include: Gulf States Toyota, GSFSGroup, GS Marketing, US AutoLogistics, Ascent Automotive Group, Auberge Resorts Collection, Imperative Entertainment, Diamond Creek Golf Club, Congaree and Legendary Adventures. Friedkin is active in U.S. and global wildlife conservation initiatives as well as various philanthropic initiatives in both aviation and education. He is chairman of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Commission, chairman of the Friedkin Conservation Fund, a trustee of the Wildlife Conservation Society, chairman of the Congaree Foundation, chairman of the Air Force Heritage Flight Foundation and an active pilot in Heritage Flight airshows, team member of Project Recover and serves on the advisory board of The Caesar Kleberg Wildlife Research Institute.


News Article | May 23, 2017
Site: www.chromatographytechniques.com

Two B-25 bombers associated with American servicemen missing in action from World War II were recently documented in the waters off Papua New Guinea by Project Recover—a collaborative team of marine scientists, archaeologists and volunteers who have combined efforts to locate aircraft and associated MIAs from World War II. The B-25 bomber is one of the most iconic airplanes of World War II, with nearly 10,000 of the famous warbirds conducting a variety of missions—from bombing to photo reconnaissance, to submarine patrols, and the historic raid over Tokyo. Present-day Papua New Guinea was the site of military action in the Pacific from January of 1942 to the end of the war in August 1945, with significant losses of aircraft and servicemen, some of whom have never been found. Project Recover is comprised of scientists from Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego and the College of Earth, Ocean, and Environment at the University of Delaware and members of the nonprofit organization BentProp, Limited. In February, a Project Recover team set out on a mission to map the seafloor in search of missing WWII aircraft, conduct an official archaeological survey of a known B-25 underwater wreck, and interview elders in villages in the immediate area. In its search of nearly 10 square kilometers, Project Recover located the debris field of a B-25 bomber that had been missing for over 70 years, associated with a crew of six MIAs. “People have this mental image of an airplane resting intact on the sea floor, but the reality is that most planes were often already damaged before crashing, or broke up upon impact. And, after soaking in the sea for decades, they are often unrecognizable to the untrained eye, often covered in corals and other sea-life,” said Katy O’Connell, Project Recover’s Executive Director, who is based at the University of Delaware’s College of Earth, Ocean, and Environment. “Our use of advanced technologies, which led to the discovery of the B-25, enables us to accelerate and enhance the discovery and eventual recovery of our missing servicemen.” Project Recover blends historical and archival data from multiple sources to narrow underwater search regions, then surveys the areas with scanning sonars, high definition imagers, advanced diving, and unmanned aerial and underwater robotic technologies. “The latest discovery is a result of the dedication and fervent efforts of everyone associated with Project Recover,” said Dan Friedkin, chairman and CEO of The Friedkin Group and a member of the Project Recover team who provides private funding for the organization. “We are encouraged at the progress that is being made as our search efforts expand and remain committed to locating the resting places of all U.S. servicemen missing since World War II.” In addition to searching for missing aircraft, Project Recover also conducts archaeological surveys of sites that are known, but not yet documented, like the site of a B-25 bomber that was discovered in Madang Harbor, Papua New Guinea. “While well known to locals and scuba enthusiasts for over 30 years, this particular B-25 had never been officially surveyed,” said Andrew Pietruszka, a Scripps Oceanography scientist and Project Recover’s underwater archaeologist.  Of the six crew associated with the aircraft, five survived the crash but were taken prisoner by the Japanese. The remaining crewmember went down with the plane and is still listed as missing. “Our team of divers and scientists conducts site surveys to fully document the wreckage. That documentation can then be used by the U.S. government to correlate soldiers still missing in action with the aircraft site we discovered, and to evaluate that site for the possible recovery of remains,” said Pietruszka. While the scientific focus of Project Recover is to conduct underwater searches and surveys, equally important are the historical accounts of crashes that are often part of local histories, passed from one generation to another. While speaking to village elders about the two B-25 cases, Project Recover team members were told about local terrestrial burial sites and an additional aircraft that had crashed on land. Project Recover provides detailed information about its missions and any discovered wrecks and possible links to airmen listed as missing in action to the Department of Defense’s Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA). DPAA is tasked with recovery and repatriation efforts, including notification of the families of these MIAs. “Any find in the field is treated with the utmost care, respect and solemnity,” said O’Connell. “There are still over 73,000 U.S. service members unaccounted for from World War II, leaving families with unanswered questions about their loved ones. We hope that our global efforts can help to bring closure and honor the service of the fallen.” The mission to Papua New Guinea kicked off Project Recover’s second year of formal operations and was made possible by a substantial financial commitment from Friedkin in 2016. Friedkin’s continued support is helping sustain ongoing missions, while enabling the organization to innovate its technology and broaden its search and discovery efforts to focus areas around the world. In 2016, team members expanded operations, conducting missions in eight countries (England, New Caledonia, Palau, Saipan, the Solomon Islands, Tinian, and the U.S.) in search of over 20 aircraft and 100 service members still missing in action. Five aircraft were successfully identified and documented, with documentation submitted to DPAA. The missions also resulted in new leads, based on field research and personal accounts from locals, which will aid in planning for future missions. Among other missions around the world, Project Recover plans to return to Papua New Guinea later this year to focus on other cases of interest and further explore leads that developed from the February 2017 mission.


Two B-25 bombers associated with American servicemen missing in action from World War II were recently documented in the waters off Papua New Guinea by Project Recover -- a collaborative team of marine scientists, archaeologists and volunteers who have combined efforts to locate aircraft and associated MIAs from World War II. The B-25 bomber is one of the most iconic airplanes of World War II, with nearly 10,000 of the famous warbirds conducting a variety of missions -- from bombing to photo reconnaissance, to submarine patrols, and the historic raid over Tokyo. Present-day Papua New Guinea was the site of military action in the Pacific from January of 1942 to the end of the war in August 1945, with significant losses of aircraft and servicemen, some of whom have never been found. Project Recover is composed of scientists from Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego and the College of Earth, Ocean, and Environment at the University of Delaware and members of the nonprofit organization BentProp, Limited. In February, a Project Recover team set out on a mission to map the seafloor in search of missing WWII aircraft, conduct an official archaeological survey of a known B-25 underwater wreck, and interview elders in villages in the immediate area. In its search of nearly 10 square kilometers, Project Recover located the debris field of a B-25 bomber that had been missing for over 70 years, associated with a crew of six MIAs. "People have this mental image of an airplane resting intact on the sea floor, but the reality is that most planes were often already damaged before crashing, or broke up upon impact. And, after soaking in the sea for decades, they are often unrecognizable to the untrained eye, often covered in corals and other sea-life," said Katy O'Connell, Project Recover's Executive Director, who is based at the University of Delaware's College of Earth, Ocean, and Environment. "Our use of advanced technologies, which led to the discovery of the B-25, enables us to accelerate and enhance the discovery and eventual recovery of our missing servicemen." Project Recover blends historical and archival data from multiple sources to narrow underwater search regions, then surveys the areas with scanning sonars, high definition imagers, advanced diving, and unmanned aerial and underwater robotic technologies. "The latest discovery is a result of the dedication and fervent efforts of everyone associated with Project Recover," said Dan Friedkin, chairman and CEO of The Friedkin Group and a member of the Project Recover team who provides private funding for the organization. "We are encouraged at the progress that is being made as our search efforts expand and remain committed to locating the resting places of all U.S. servicemen missing since World War II." In addition to searching for missing aircraft, Project Recover also conducts archaeological surveys of sites that are known, but not yet documented, like the site of a B-25 bomber that was discovered in Madang Harbor, Papua New Guinea. "While well known to locals and scuba enthusiasts for over 30 years, this particular B-25 had never been officially surveyed," said Andrew Pietruszka, a Scripps Oceanography scientist and Project Recover's underwater archaeologist. Of the six crew associated with the aircraft, five survived the crash but were taken prisoner by the Japanese. The remaining crewmember went down with the plane and is still listed as missing. "Our team of divers and scientists conducts site surveys to fully document the wreckage. That documentation can then be used by the U.S. government to correlate soldiers still missing in action with the aircraft site we discovered, and to evaluate that site for the possible recovery of remains," said Pietruszka. While the scientific focus of Project Recover is to conduct underwater searches and surveys, equally important are the historical accounts of crashes that are often part of local histories, passed from one generation to another. While speaking to village elders about the two B-25 cases, Project Recover team members were told about local terrestrial burial sites and an additional aircraft that had crashed on land. Project Recover provides detailed information about its missions and any discovered wrecks and possible links to airmen listed as missing in action to the Department of Defense's Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA). DPAA is tasked with recovery and repatriation efforts, including notification of the families of these MIAs. "Any find in the field is treated with the utmost care, respect and solemnity," said O'Connell. "There are still over 73,000 U.S. service members unaccounted for from World War II, leaving families with unanswered questions about their loved ones. We hope that our global efforts can help to bring closure and honor the service of the fallen." The mission to Papua New Guinea kicked off Project Recover's second year of formal operations and was made possible by a substantial financial commitment from Friedkin in 2016. Friedkin's continued support is helping sustain ongoing missions, while enabling the organization to innovate its technology and broaden its search and discovery efforts to focus areas around the world. In 2016, team members expanded operations, conducting missions in eight countries (England, New Caledonia, Palau, Saipan, the Solomon Islands, Tinian, and the U.S.) in search of over 20 aircraft and 100 service members still missing in action. Five aircraft were successfully identified and documented, with documentation submitted to DPAA. The missions also resulted in new leads, based on field research and personal accounts from locals, which will aid in planning for future missions. Among other missions around the world, Project Recover plans to return to Papua New Guinea later this year to focus on other cases of interest and further explore leads that developed from the February 2017 mission. Project Recover is a public-private partnership to enlist 21st century science and technology combined with in-depth archival and historical research in a quest to find the final underwater resting places of Americans missing in action since World War II. Established in 2012 with initial support from the Office of Naval Research and formalized in 2016 with private funding, Project Recover is a partnership among researchers at the University of Delaware's College of Earth, Ocean, and Environment, Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego, and The BentProp Project, Limited.


News Article | May 10, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

South Korea's presidential candidate Moon Jae-in of the Democratic Party is greeted by supporters in front of his house in Seoul, South Korea, Tuesday, May 9, 2017. Moon Jae-in declared victory in South Korea's presidential election Tuesday after his two main rivals conceded. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man) SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — Moon Jae-in, who was declared South Korea's new president after winning Tuesday's special election, has led a life as turbulent as that of the nation he will lead. The son of refugees who fled North Korea during the 1950-53 Korean War, Moon, 64, grew up in poverty and was jailed for protesting military-backed dictators. Moon later became a human rights lawyer and worked for late liberal President Roh Moo-hyun. Here's a short look at his life. Moon's North Korean parents resettled in South Korea's southeast before he was born in January 1953. They initially lived in a POW camp. As a boy, he often went to a Catholic church with a bucket to get free U.S. corn flour and milk powder. After entering Seoul's' Kyung Hee University in 1972, Moon joined a pro-democracy movement to topple the dictatorship of Park Chung-hee, who ruled South Korea for 18 years until his 1979 assassination. Park was the father of recently ousted conservative President Park Geun-hye. In 1975, Moon was jailed for months for staging anti-government protests before being conscripted into the military's special forces. Moon became a lawyer and joined Roh's law office in the early 1980s. They defended the rights of poor laborers and student activists until Roh entered politics in 1988. Moon says their friendship changed his life. After Roh became president in 2003, Moon became what local media called Roh's "King secretary" or "Roh Moo-hyun's shadow." When Roh was impeached in 2004 over alleged election law violations, Moon served as a defense lawyer before a court restored Roh's presidential power. After Roh left office and faced a corruption investigation, Moon was his lawyer. Roh jumped to his death in May 2009. Moon says Roh's death led him to politics. Moon lost the 2012 election to Park Geun-hye by a million votes. When the corruption scandal involving Park flared last fall, Moon saw his popularity rise amid massive public outrage toward her conservative government.


News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: www.techradar.com

O2 must be feeling generous - it's just doubled the amount of data you'll get on its deals for some of the best mobile phones on the market, including the iPhone 7, 6 and SE, Samsung Galaxy S8 and S7 and the LG G6. With EE, Vodafone and Three breathing down its neck, this O2 offer stakes a claim as some of the most competitive pricing on the market right now. Keep scrolling to see the top deals that have really caught our eye. And because this pricing is available exclusively from Mobiles.co.uk, you can get an extra tenner off by entering the code 10OFF at the checkout (except for the Galaxy S8). Bonus. Unsure what O2 brings to the table? We'll give you the lowdown on the network, too. 6GB data | £65 upfront  (with 10OFF code)| Unlimited calls and texts | £29 per month O2 was already leading the way on its prices for iPhone 7s with a medium amount of data, and now it's even better. If you were worried that 3GB might now be quite enough data for you per month, 6GB should be plenty. This is a superb deal. Total cost over 24 months is £761 6GB data | £140 upfront (with 10OFF code) | Unlimited calls and texts | £29 per month If 32GB just simply isn't going to cut it, then O2 is your friend. For a mere £29 a month you can get hold of the more capacious 128GB model. It's a bit of a wedge to spend up front, but you now get a decent 6GB of data and much more room for music and videos. Total cost over 24 months is £836 10GB data | £150 upfront | Unlimited minutes and texts | £34pm POW! O2 just put itself in pole position when it comes to Samsung Galaxy S8 deals. 10GB of data will be sufficient for most users out there and £34 a month is just about as little as you can pay for this brand new flagship phone. Total cost over 24 months is £966 1GB | £40 upfront  (with 10OFF code)| Unlimited calls and texts | £19 per month Now is a fantastic time to buy an iPhone 6. Apple's 2014 flagship phone remains a superb handset and you can now get it for less than £20 a month. It may only be 1GB of data, but you won't find this phone cheaper anywhere else. Total cost over 24 months is £496 Get this iPhone 6 deal: from Mobiles.co.uk 6GB | £50 upfront (with TR25G6 code) | Unlimited minutes and texts | £29pm This is perhaps the best value LG G6 deal on any network right now - especially when you combine it with TechRadar's exclusive TR25G6 code. Then, after the resulting £50 retail cost, it's just £29 per month for 6GB data and unlimited everything else. Really good value deal. Total cost over 24 months is £746 O2 has been around for yonks, and even longer when you consider that it effectively took over BT Cellnet's trading name in 2001. It now sits as the second-largest mobile phone network after EE. Its best claim for your contract is with its Priority rewards - from cheap weekly lunch deals and pre-order privileges on gig tickets, to ad-hoc discounts and competitions. Plus, they have 1000s of wifi hotspots in shops and cafes that you can connect to for free and save your precious data. You sure can - we wouldn't feature them if you couldn't! Mobiles.co.uk is part of the more well-known Carphone Warehouse group. It's been around for more than two decades and has been named 'best online retailer' at the last two Mobile Choice Awards. We frequently find that it beats the competition to the best prices on the biggest handsets, and O2's double data offer only cements that further. And - unless you're buying the Galaxy S8 - don't forget to pop the code 10OFF in at the checkout to bag an extra tenner off the price of the phone.

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