Potter Park Zoo

Lansing, MI, United States

Potter Park Zoo

Lansing, MI, United States
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News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

For those looking to venture out on a weekend getaway, the Arbor Day Foundation has compiled a list of 10 not-to-miss Arbor Day celebrations. Nebraska City, Nebraska You won't want to miss Arbor Day in its home town of Nebraska City, where it has been celebrated since the inaugural holiday 145 years ago. The city boasts loads of family-friendly activities and events all Arbor Day weekend long, including an Arbor Day 5K and parade as well as an Arbor Day Market. Visitors can also stop by the home of J. Sterling Morton, the founder of Arbor Day, or visit Arbor Day Farm and Lied Lodge. Ripley, Ohio This year, Ripley won an Arbor Day celebration for participation in the Alliance for Community Trees NeighborWoods® Month photo contest. The contest awarded a grant for the winning submission of a beautiful city tree canopy picture. To celebrate, the village will plant six trees on Arbor Day, hold a poster contest, and give away seedlings to elementary students. Cedar Hill, Texas Celebrate with Cedar Hill at Earth Fest this year. Join city officials and learn what it means to be a Tree City USA and how trees have benefited the city. Mayor Franke will read an Arbor Day proclamation declaring the celebration of Arbor Day in Cedar Hill.  Attendees will get a free tree to take home and plant. Coeur d'Alene, Idaho Come celebrate the 145th Birthday of Arbor Day with cake, snacks, tree fun and prizes. Join in at noon at the Harbor House for a tree planting and presentation of our 33rd Tree City USA award. Arbor Day art contest winners will be revealed, and you'll have the opportunity to learn more about the trees that make this city so great. Lansing, Michigan Feel the excitement as more than 1,100 second- and third-graders visit Potter Park Zoo to learn about nature. Students will watch the planting of the official State Arbor Day tree, and local experts will have hands-on activities for them, inspiring future stewards of the environment. Frankfort, Kentucky Celebrate Arbor Day in Frankfort with a hot air balloon ride. Afterward, enjoy the Tree City USA recognition ceremony and tree planting. You'll also receive a free tree to plant and commemorate the day. Manhattan, Kansas The Kansas Forest Service is celebrating their 130th anniversary this year. Join the Forest Service in a tree planting event filled with a tree walk to test your tree knowledge, tree care tips from the experts and the unveiling of the new community arboretum. Bellevue, Washington Celebrate 'city in a park' at the annual Arbor Day-Earth Day family festival, where trees take center stage at Lewis Creek Park. Watch an official ceremonial tree planting featuring a presentation of colors by VFW Post 2995. Join Bellevue as it celebrates its 26th year as a recognized Tree City USA and learn why trees are so great for the city. Don't miss out. Aspen, Colorado Join the city in celebrating Arbor Day at Paepke Park. Get answers to all your buzzing tree care questions from one of the numerous local tree care companies and agencies with informational booths, take a ride in the bucket of a pruning truck and see why trees are so cool. Plus, attendees have the chance to win a free tree in the tree raffle. Henderson, Nevada Henderson knows how to build excitement, so they celebrate Arbor Day in a week-long program. During the week of Arbor Day, city officials will visit fourth-grade classrooms to teach students about the tree planter's holiday. The week ends with a citywide celebration downtown where winners of the Arbor Day poster contest are announced. Come to the celebration and watch a climbing demo by a local tree contractor and participate in other fun tree activities. "Arbor Day is that one day every year reminding us to think about all that trees do for us — a day for reflection and for action," said Dan Lambe, president, Arbor Day Foundation. "On April 28, communities across the country will to come together to plant, nurture and celebrate trees. We invite you to set differences aside, grab a shovel and make a positive impact in your community by planting a tree." About the Arbor Day Foundation Founded in 1972, the Arbor Day Foundation has grown to become the largest nonprofit membership organization dedicated to planting trees, with more than one million members, supporters, and valued partners. During the last 44 years, more than 250 million Arbor Day Foundation trees have been planted in neighborhoods, communities, cities and forests throughout the world. Our vision is to help others understand and use trees as a solution to many of the global issues we face today, including air quality, water quality, climate change, deforestation, poverty and hunger. As one of the world's largest operating conservation foundations, the Arbor Day Foundation, through its members, partners and programs, educates and engages stakeholders and communities across the globe to involve themselves in its mission of planting, nurturing and celebrating trees.  More information is available at arborday.org. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/communities-across-the-country-prepare-to-celebrate-the-145th-arbor-day-300440899.html


Bailey R.L.,Michigan State University | Bailey R.L.,Cornell University | Campa III H.,Michigan State University | Harrison T.M.,Potter Park Zoo
Herpetologica | Year: 2011

The Eastern Massasauga rattlesnake, Sistrurus catenatus catenatus, is a candidate for US federal listing and is legally protected in every state or province in which it occurs. Habitat degradation and human persecution have contributed to range-wide population declines. Survival estimates are essential for a thorough understanding of population dynamics, yet are rarely reported for S. c. catenatus in the peer-reviewed literature. There has been little research on massasauga survival in managed areas of Michigan, USA, the state considered to be the last S. c. catenatus stronghold. Our objectives were to estimate survival of massasaugas during the active season (May-October) in southwestern Lower Michigan and describe causes of mortality. We captured (mid-May to late August), radiomarked, and monitored 27 adult massasaugas in 2008 and 2009 and pooled data for analyses. We observed snakes throughout the active season and estimated survival (Mayfield method) for that period (11 May-29 October; 168 d). Cause-specific mortality was investigated qualitatively. Estimated survival probability for the active season was 0.9472 (CI = 0.8518-1.0000), higher than any estimate for similar studies of which we are aware. The single mortality event observed was caused by predation. We suggest that the high massasauga survivorship in this area might be attributable to habitat management for S. c. catenatus combined with a relative lack of infrastructure and human persecution. Our results suggest that adult S. c. catenatus survival is potentially geographically variable and can be high in areas not well-investigated, such as southwestern Lower Michigan. More research would yield long-term survival trends for the studied population as well as throughout their range. © 2011 The Herpetologists' League, Inc.


Bailey R.L.,Michigan State University | Bailey R.L.,Cornell University | Campa H.,Michigan State University | Harrison T.M.,Potter Park Zoo
Journal of Wildlife Management | Year: 2012

The eastern massasauga rattlesnake (Sistrurus catenatus catenatus) has experienced population declines throughout its range and is now a candidate for federal protection. However, little is known about massasauga habitat selection in Michigan, particularly in actively managed landscapes. Our objectives were to: 1) quantify whether massasaugas in southwestern Michigan select certain vegetation types disproportionately to their availability and 2) quantify whether the vegetation structure associated with snake locations differed between managed (e.g., burning, woody species removal) and unmanaged stands. We implanted radio transmitters in 51 snakes from 2004 to 2005 and 2008 to 2009. We quantified second-order resource selection using compositional analysis, and modeled the effect of habitat management efforts on vegetation using 4 structural variables. All snakes selected cover types disproportionately to their availability (P = 0.001); a ranking matrix ordered the vegetation types, from most to least used, as: early-mid successional deciduous wetland > early-mid successional deciduous upland > developed > late successional mixed lowland forest > late successional deciduous upland forest. We found that snakes in managed areas were associated with greater amounts of dead herbaceous cover (P = 0.005) and less woody stem density (P < 0.001) and tree dominance (P < 0.001) than were snakes in unmanaged areas; however, live herbaceous cover was comparable. Our results can be used by regional managers to provide early and mid successional habitat with structure similar to that selected by snakes in Michigan. © 2011 The Wildlife Society.


Reichert-Stewart J.L.,University of Illinois at Urbana - Champaign | Santymire R.M.,Davee Center for Epidemiology and Endocrinology | Armstrong D.,Davee Center for Epidemiology and Endocrinology | Harrison T.M.,Potter Park Zoo | And 2 more authors.
Theriogenology | Year: 2014

Although the snow leopard (Uncia uncia) is a common endangered felid species in zoos, little is known about the complex endocrine interactions controlling ovarian function and conception in this species. The goal of this work was to characterize ovarian activity throughout the estrous cycle, nonpregnant luteal phase (pseudopregnancy), and gestation in female snow leopards. This goal was accomplished using an enzyme immunoassay to measure fecal concentrations of estrogen metabolites (E) and progesterone metabolites (P). Fecal samples were collected from 12 female snow leopards (ages 18months to 18years) during one to three breeding seasons. In each breeding season, the majority of females (78%, 88%, and 100%, respectively) began to exhibit ovarian activity in December or January. The estrous cycle, defined by the first day of estrus (E2×basal concentration) to the first day of the subsequent estrus, was 12.7±0.6days (n=145 cycles). Estrus lasted 4.3±0.4days with mean concentrations of fecal E during the follicular phase (1661±139ng/g feces) increasing 3.2-fold above basal concentrations (515±32ng/g feces). No spontaneous ovulations were observed in any of the cycling females. Nonpregnant luteal phases were observed in eight females that bred but did not become pregnant. The length of the nonpregnant luteal phase ranged from 11 to 72days (45.7±5.7days; n=10) with mean concentrations of fecal P during the luteal phase (12.46±1.7μg/g feces) increasing 6.2-fold above basal concentrations of P (2.01±0.2μg/g feces). Three of the females in the study became pregnant and gave birth after a gestation of 93 (n=2) and 95 (n=1) days. Fecal P concentrations during pregnancy increased to 11.64±1.3μg/g feces, or 5.8-fold above basal concentrations. The results of this study provide a comprehensive characterization of reproductive endocrinology in snow leopards, and confirm that fecal hormone monitoring is an effective way to monitor female snow leopards throughout the breeding season. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.


PubMed | U.S. Army, Potter Park Zoo, Michigan State University and North Carolina State University
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Zoo biology | Year: 2016

Through the use of operant conditioning, the authors developed a technique to facilitate obtaining blood samples from a black rhinoceros diagnosed with idiopathic epilepsy. The technique involved operant conditioning to facilitate venipuncture of the transverse facial vein, at an anatomic landmark on the lateral side of the face ventral to the medial canthus of the eye, and dorsal to the lateral commissure of the mouth. The investigators used standard operant conditioning protocols to train the animal for desensitization to a needle puncture in the facial vein. Blood samples obtained from the facial location were free of excessive hemolysis and allowed for large volumes to be collected. The procedure was well-tolerated by the rhinoceros and could be performed regularly without complication. Zoo Biol. 35:570-573, 2016. 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Schlanser J.R.,Potter Park Zoo | Agnew D.,Michigan State University | Paperd D.W.,Potter Park Zoo | Harrison T.M.,Potter Park Zoo
Journal of Veterinary Medical Science | Year: 2014

A 10-year-old male red panda presented acutely with symptoms of shock due to acute abdominal distress and respiratory compromise. Abdominal ultrasound confirmed a severely distended stomach for which passage of an orogastric tube for relief was unsuccessful. Intra-operatively, the stomach was found to be distended and torsed around its long axis supporting the diagnosis of Gastric dilitationvolvulus (GDV). The animal arrested and died intra-operatively and was submitted for necropsy with lesions supportive of the diagnosis of GDV. No risk factors for GDV were found to correlate between the panda and those described in domestic dogs. This case suggests that red pandas can be susceptible to this condition in captive settings. © 2014 The Japanese Society of Veterinary Science.


Harrison T.M.,Potter Park Zoo | Harrison T.M.,Michigan State University | Stanley B.J.,Michigan State University | Sikarskie J.G.,Michigan State University | And 8 more authors.
Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine | Year: 2011

A 14-yr-old female eastern black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis michaeli) presented with progressive suppurative osteomyelitis in her left hind lateral toe. β-Hemolytic Streptococcus sp. was isolated. The animal was treated with multiple systemic antibiotics, and topical wound cleansing. Repeated debridements and nail trimmings were performed for 5 mo prior to electing amputation. The toe was surgically amputated under general anesthesia between the first and second phalanges. Analgesia was diffused into the wound topically via a catheter and elastomeric pump. The open amputation site was covered with adherent drapes and a negative-pressure wound therapy device provided vacuum-assisted closure (V.A.C.®) for 72 hr. Three months later this animal developed a deep dermal ulcer on the lateral aspect of the right hind limb, at the level of the stifle. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was isolated. The wound was managed by initial daily lavage, followed by 1 mo of V.A.C. therapy, with 72 hr between dressing changes. Clinically, this therapy expedited the formation of healthy granulation tissue and overall healing was accelerated. The animal tolerated the machine and bandage changes well via operant conditioning. The use of negative-pressure wound therapy appeared to shorten time to resolution of slow-healing wounds in black rhinoceros. Copyright 2011 by American Association of Zoo Veterinarians.


Vital M.,Michigan State University | Gao J.,Michigan State University | Rizzo M.,Michigan State University | Harrison T.,Potter Park Zoo | And 2 more authors.
ISME Journal | Year: 2015

Butyrate-producing bacteria have an important role in maintaining host health. They are well studied in human and medically associated animal models; however, much less is known for other Vertebrata. We investigated the butyrate-producing community in hindgut-fermenting Mammalia (n=38), Aves (n=8) and Reptilia (n=8) using a gene-targeted pyrosequencing approach of the terminal genes of the main butyrate-synthesis pathways, namely butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase (but) and butyrate kinase (buk). Most animals exhibit high gene abundances, and clear diet-specific signatures were detected with but genes significantly enriched in omnivores and herbivores compared with carnivores. But dominated the butyrate-producing community in these two groups, whereas buk was more abundant in many carnivorous animals. Clustering of protein sequences (5% cutoff) of the combined communities (but and buk) placed carnivores apart from other diet groups, except for noncarnivorous Carnivora, which clustered together with carnivores. The majority of clusters (but: 5141 and buk: 2924) did not show close relation to any reference sequences from public databases (identity <90%) demonstrating a large 'unknown diversity'. Each diet group had abundant signature taxa, where buk genes linked to Clostridium perfringens dominated in carnivores and but genes associated with Ruminococcaceae bacterium D16 were specific for herbivores and omnivores. Whereas 16S rRNA gene analysis showed similar overall patterns, it was unable to reveal communities at the same depth and resolution as the functional gene-targeted approach. This study demonstrates that butyrate producers are abundant across vertebrates exhibiting great functional redundancy and that diet is the primary determinant governing the composition of the butyrate-producing guild. © 2015 International Society for Microbial Ecology All rights reserved.


PubMed | Potter Park Zoo
Type: Case Reports | Journal: The Journal of veterinary medical science | Year: 2014

A 10-year-old male red panda presented acutely with symptoms of shock due to acute abdominal distress and respiratory compromise. Abdominal ultrasound confirmed a severely distended stomach for which passage of an orogastric tube for relief was unsuccessful. Intra-operatively, the stomach was found to be distended and torsed around its long axis supporting the diagnosis of Gastric dilitation-volvulus (GDV). The animal arrested and died intra-operatively and was submitted for necropsy with lesions supportive of the diagnosis of GDV. No risk factors for GDV were found to correlate between the panda and those described in domestic dogs. This case suggests that red pandas can be susceptible to this condition in captive settings.


PubMed | Potter Park Zoo
Type: Case Reports | Journal: Journal of zoo and wildlife medicine : official publication of the American Association of Zoo Veterinarians | Year: 2012

A 14-yr-old female eastern black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis michaeli) presented with progressive suppurative osteomyelitis in her left hind lateral toe. beta-Hemolytic Streptococcus sp. was isolated. The animal was treated with multiple systemic antibiotics, and topical wound cleansing. Repeated debridements and nail trimmings were performed for 5 mo prior to electing amputation. The toe was surgically amputated under general anesthesia between the first and second phalanges. Analgesia was diffused into the wound topically via a catheter and elastomeric pump. The open amputation site was covered with adherent drapes and a negative-pressure wound therapy device provided vacuum-assisted closure (V.A.C.) for 72 hr. Three months later this animal developed a deep dermal ulcer on the lateral aspect of the right hind limb, at the level of the stifle. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was isolated. The wound was managed by initial daily lavage, followed by 1 mo of V.A.C. therapy, with 72 hr between dressing changes. Clinically, this therapy expedited the formation of healthy granulation tissue and overall healing was accelerated. The animal tolerated the machine and bandage changes well via operant conditioning. The use of negative-pressure wound therapy appeared to shorten time to resolution of slow-healing wounds in black rhinoceros.

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