Post graduate Research Center

Pune, India

Post graduate Research Center

Pune, India
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Srivastava A.A.,Post Graduate Research Center
International Journal of Pharma and Bio Sciences | Year: 2012

To meet the increasing demands for commercial nanoparticles new eco-friendly "green" methods of synthesis are being discovered. Plant mediated synthesis of nanoparticles offers single step, easy extracellular synthesis of nanoparticles. The biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles using Bryophytes as plant source is practiced previously. They are easy to harvest and easy to make an extract and therefore, can be used for green synthesis of nanoparticles. In this study, the plant extract was prepared in ethanol and treated with silver nitrate to obtain nanoparticles. The synthesis of nanoparticles was confirmed by change in colour from pale green to reddish brown. Further, a peak between 400nm to 440nm was obtained on UV-Vis spectrophotometer which confirmed the biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles. Presence of silver nanoparticles was observed after carrying out SE microscopy with EDS that gave a strong silver signal. Since the nanoparticles show antibacterial activity, their immobilization was also carried out.


Agarwala B.K.,Tripura University | Ghate H.V.,Post graduate Research Center | Bhattacharjee P.P.,Tripura University
Coleopterists Bulletin | Year: 2014

Two rare species of the longicorn beetle subfamily Lamiinae, Imantocera penicillata (Hope, 1831) and Eutaenia corbetti Gahan, 1893, from Tripura, a province in northeastern India, are redescribed and illustrated. This is the first detailed account of the external morphology of both sexes of the two species. Host plants of the two species are reported for the first time: I. penicillata was collected from Artocarpus heterophyllus Lamarck and E. corbetti was collected from Caesalpinia decapetala (Roth) Alston.


Parale A.,University of Pune | Barmukh R.,Post Graduate Research Center | Nikam T.,University of Pune
Physiology and Molecular Biology of Plants | Year: 2010

Production of valuable secondary metabolites through plant cell or organ culture is the best suited alternative to extraction of whole plant material and to increase production of secondary metabolites in in-vitro systems, feeding precursor or intermediate metabolites is an obvious and popular approach. The present investigation was aimed to study the influence of feeding of organic supplements, glycine (0-125 μM), ferulic acid (0-200 μM), phenylalanine (0-200 μM), α-ketoglutaric acid (0-200 μM) and pyruvic acid (0-200 μM) on production of bacoside-A (a triterpenoid type secondary metabolite responsible for cognition effects) in shoot and callus biomass of Bacopa monniera (L.) Pennell. The shoots were raised in liquid Murashige and Skoog's (MS) medium fortified with 5 μM 6-benzyladenine (BA) and callus biomass on agar solidified MS medium containing 1 μM 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4 -D) in conjunction with 5 μM 1-napthaleneacetic acid (NAA). Among the organic supplements used, 100 μM pyruvic acid effectively enhanced the production of bacoside-A in shoot as well as callus biomass. The bacoside-A content in in-vitro raised shoot biomass was 4.0 and 1.2 times higher as compared to control and shoot biomass of naturally grown plants respectively. Inclusion of pyruvic acid in MS medium for in-vitro shoot cultures of B. monniera, can be adapted for enhanced production of bacoside-A. © 2010 Prof. H.S. Srivastava Foundation for Science and Society.


Sameer P.,Wildlife Information Liaison Development Society | Sameer P.,Commerce and Science College | Hemant V.G.,Post Graduate Research Center
Zootaxa | Year: 2016

We describe a new species of Leptestheria from a rock pool in the Western Ghats of Maharashtra, India. This species is distinguished from all other Indian congeners by its distinct telson characters and occipital condyle. We also present a comparative table of useful morphological characters of all described Indian Leptestheria species. Copyright © 2016 Magnolia Press.


Honmore V.,Post Graduate Research Center | Kandhare A.,Bharati Vidyapeeth Deemed University | Zanwar A.A.,Bharati Vidyapeeth Deemed University | Rojatkar S.,Bharati Vidyapeeth Deemed University | And 2 more authors.
Pharmaceutical Biology | Year: 2015

Context: Acetaminophen (APAP) leads to severe hepatic and renal necrosis and thus causes significant clinical problems. Artemisia pallens Walls ex D.C. (Asteraceae) possesses various pharmacological properties such as antidiabetic, antioxidant, analgesic, and anti-inflammatory activity. Objective: The objective was to evaluate the protective effects of Artemisia pallens methanol extract (APME) in APAP-induced hepatic and nephro-toxicity. Materials and methods: The methanolic extract of aerial parts of Artemisia pallens (APME) was prepared. Toxicity was induced in male Wistar rats (180-220 g) by administration of APAP (700 mg/kg, p.o., 14 d). APME (100, 200, and 400 mg/kg, p.o.) was administered to rats 2 h before APAP oral administration. Various biochemical and molecular parameters along with histopathological aberration were studied in the kidney and liver of rats. Results: Pretreatment with APME (200 and 400 mg/kg, p.o.) significantly (p<0.01 and p<0.001) decreased aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT), bilirubin, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), and serum creatinine as compared with APAP-treated rat. Decreased level of serum albumin, serum uric acid, and HDL were significantly (p<0.01 and p<0.001) restored by APME (200 and 400 mg/kg, p.o.) pre-treatment. Administration of APME (200 and 400 mg/kg, p.o.) significantly (p<0.01 and p<0.001) reduced the elevated level of cholesterol, LDL, LDH, triglyceride, and VLDL. It also significantly (p<0.01 and p<0.001) restored the altered level of hepatic and renal antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione (GSH)). The increased level of malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitric oxide (NO) in hepatic as well as renal tissue was significantly (p<0.01 and p<0.001) decreased by APME (200 and 400 mg/kg, p.o.) administration. Histological alternation induced by APAP in liver and kidney was also reduced by the APME (200 and 400 mg/kg, p.o.) pre-treatment. Conclusion: It is concluded that the methanol extract of Artemisia pallens alleviates APAP induced in rats toxicity through its antioxidative and anti-inflammatory actions. © 2014 Informa Healthcare USA, Inc.


Telave A.B.,Post Graduate Research Center
Indian Journal of Geo-Marine Sciences | Year: 2015

In the present report attempt is made to in depth survey of the species Sonneratia L. throughout Maharashtra and its analysis for biochemical, elemental composition, species dynamics and the distribution of the species along the coast. Carbohydrate composition varies from species to species. Protein content is more in all the three species followed by polyphenols. The elemental composition is also varies and is species specific. Chlorides concentration in S. alba is more indicating succulence and sulphate requirement in S. apetala indicates its non succulence. Amino acids content in S. caseolaris is more may used in osmoregulation. © 2015, National Institute of Science Communication and Information Resources (NISCAIR). All rights reserved.


Patil N.M.,Post Graduate Research Center
Asian Journal of Crop Science | Year: 2012

Effect of increasing levels of NaCl and Na 2SO 4 on mineral content in various organs of safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.) cv. Bhima was investigated at flowering. Results revealed that Dry Matter (DM) per plant decreased with increasing levels of NaCl. DM increased at low levels and decreased at all higher levels of Na 2SO 4 at flowering and maturity. Plants completed life cycle upto ECe 7.5 mS cm -1 of chloride and ECe 10.0 mS cm -1 of sulphate salinity. Plants tolerate all levels of chloride and higher levels of sulphate salinity by storing toxic minerals in roots and basal part of stem and by translocating essential elements to the leaves indicating presence of regulatory mechanism at the junction of root and stem; within the stem and in between the stem and leaves in safflower. © 2012 Asian Network for Scientific Information.


Jakhalekar S.S.,Post Graduate Research Center | Ghate H.V.,Post Graduate Research Center
Zootaxa | Year: 2016

We present additional taxonomic descriptions, with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) illustrations, field observations documented by colour photographs, and notes on habitats and ecology of Corvospongilla ultima (Annandale), Eunapius crassissimus (Annandale), Stratospongilla bombayensis (Carter), S. gravelyi (Annandale) and S. indica (Annandale) from recent sponge collections made in western Maharashtra, India. Stratospongilla gravelyi is rediscovered after a century, and along with it, C. ultima and S. indica are illustrated with SEM images for the first time, unequivocally differentiating these two species. Additional taxonomic, ecological data and illustrations of Corvospongilla lapidosa (Annandale), Dosilia plumosa (Carter), Ephydatia meyeni (Carter), Eunapius carteri (Bowerbank) and Radiospongilla cerebellata (Bowerbank) are also provided to supplement the previously published SEM illustrations. All ten spongillid species treated here were originally described from India and three of them are known to be endemic to the Indian region. Present study is the first re-examination of these Indian spongillid species using SEM, providing greater resolution of their important taxonomic characters and careful documentation of their habitats. Copyright © 2016 Magnolia Press.


We present additional taxonomic descriptions, with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) illustrations, field observations documented by colour photographs, and notes on habitats and ecology of Corvospongilla ultima (Annandale), Eunapius crassissimus (Annandale), Stratospongilla bombayensis (Carter), S. gravelyi (Annandale) and S. indica (Annandale) from recent sponge collections made in western Maharashtra, India. Stratospongilla gravelyi is rediscovered after a century, and along with it, C. ultima and S. indica are illustrated with SEM images for the first time, unequivocally differentiating these two species. Additional taxonomic, ecological data and illustrations of Corvospongilla lapidosa (Annandale), Dosilia plumosa (Carter), Ephydatia meyeni (Carter), Eunapius carteri (Bowerbank) and Radiospongilla cerebellata (Bowerbank) are also provided to supplement the previously published SEM illustrations. All ten spongillid species treated here were originally described from India and three of them are known to be endemic to the Indian region. Present study is the first re-examination of these Indian spongillid species using SEM, providing greater resolution of their important taxonomic characters and careful documentation of their habitats.


PubMed | Commerce and Science College and Post Graduate Research Center
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Zootaxa | Year: 2016

We describe a new species of Leptestheria from a rock pool in the Western Ghats of Maharashtra, India. This species is distinguished from all other Indian congeners by its distinct telson characters and occipital condyle. We also present a comparative table of useful morphological characters of all described Indian Leptestheria species.

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