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Chidambaram S.,Georgetown University | Nair M.N.,Georgetown University | Krishnan S.S.,Post Graduate Institute of Neurological Surgery | Cai L.,Georgetown University | And 2 more authors.
World Neurosurgery | Year: 2015

Objective Postoperative central nervous system infections (PCNSIs) are rare but serious complications after neurosurgery. The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence and causative pathogens of PCNSIs at a modernized, resource-limited neurosurgical center in South Asia. Methods A retrospective analysis was conducted of the medical records of all 363 neurosurgical cases performed between June 1, 2012, and June 30, 2013, at a neurosurgical center in South Asia. Data from all operative neurosurgical cases during the 13-month period were included. Results Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis indicated that 71 of the 363 surgical cases had low CSF glucose or CSF leukocytosis. These 71 cases were categorized as PCNSIs. The PCNSIs with positive CSF cultures (9.86%) all had gram-negative bacteria with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n = 5), Escherichia coli (n = 1), or Klebsiella pneumoniae (n = 1). The data suggest a higher rate of death (P = 0.031), a higher rate of CSF leak (P < 0.001), and a higher rate of cranial procedures (P < 0.001) among the infected patients and a higher rate of CSF leak among the patients with culture-positive infections (P = 0.038). Conclusions This study summarizes the prevalence, causative organism of PCNSI, and antibiotic usage for all of the neurosurgical cases over a 13-month period in a modernized yet resource-limited neurosurgical center located in South Asia. The results from this study highlight the PCNSI landscape in an area of the world that is often underreported in the neurosurgical literature because of the paucity of clinical neurosurgical research undertaken there. This study shows an increasing prevalence of gram-negative organisms in CSF cultures from PCNSIs, which supports a trend in the recent literature of increasing gram-negative bacillary meningitis. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. Source


Cugati G.,Post Graduate Institute of Neurological Surgery | Singh M.,Post Graduate Institute of Neurological Surgery | Pande A.,Post Graduate Institute of Neurological Surgery | Ramamurthi R.,Post Graduate Institute of Neurological Surgery | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Craniovertebral Junction and Spine | Year: 2011

An epidural location for lymphoma is observed in 0.1-6.5% of all the lymphomas. Primary spinal epidural lymphoma (PSEL) is a subset of lymphomas, where there are no other recognizable sites of lymphomas at the time of diagnosis. The incidence of this subset of lymphomas is much less. It, however, is increasingly diagnosed, due to the increased use of more sensitive imaging modalities. For the electronic search, Pubmed was used to identify journals that enlisted and enumerated PSEL from 1961 to January 2011. The following combination of terms: "primary," "spinal," "epidural," and "lymphoma" were used. The most significant articles and their bibliographies were analyzed by the authors. The symptoms, pathogenesis, diagnostic workup, histopathology, treatment, and outcome have been analyzed in a systematic manner. Source


Cugati G.,Post Graduate Institute of Neurological Surgery | Singh M.,Post Graduate Institute of Neurological Surgery | Symss N.P.,Post Graduate Institute of Neurological Surgery | Pande A.,Post Graduate Institute of Neurological Surgery | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Clinical Neuroscience | Year: 2012

Intracranial schwannomas commonly arise from the eighth cranial nerve in the cerebellopontine angle. Schwannoma arising in the sella and extending into the suprasellar region is very rare and is easily mistaken for pituitary adenoma. To our knowledge, there have been only 12 previous reports. We present a patient with primary intrasellar schwannoma that clinically and radiologically resembled a pituitary adenoma (PA). Intra-operative findings differed from a PA, as the tumour had a firmer consistency. Gross total excision of the lesion was done via a transethmosphenoidal approach. Post-operatively the patient improved in visual acuity and visual fields. We have reviewed the literature and described the characteristics of such lesions. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Source


Vikram M.,Post Graduate Institute of Neurological Surgery | Pande A.,Post Graduate Institute of Neurological Surgery | Vasudevan M.C.,Post Graduate Institute of Neurological Surgery | Ravi R.,Post Graduate Institute of Neurological Surgery
British Journal of Neurosurgery | Year: 2010

Cystic neurofibromas are very rare and are of separate entity; occurrence in the cervical spine extending over a long segment intra-durally is very rare. There is a paucity of literature available on cervical cystic Schwannoma and its MRI characteristics. As the preoperative diagnosis of these tumors helps in planning the surgery for this rare tumor the imaging findings reported herein may aid in the preoperative diagnosis and management. © 2010 The Neurosurgical Foundation. Source


Kapu R.,Post Graduate Institute of Neurological Surgery | Singh M.,Post Graduate Institute of Neurological Surgery | Pande A.,Post Graduate Institute of Neurological Surgery | Vasudevan M.C.,Post Graduate Institute of Neurological Surgery | Ramamurthi R.,Post Graduate Institute of Neurological Surgery
Journal of Craniovertebral Junction and Spine | Year: 2012

We report a patient with congenital anomaly of cervical spine, who presented with clinical features suggestive of cervical compressive spondylotic myelopathy. He underwent C3 median corpectomy, graft placement, and stabilization from C2 to C4 vertebral bodies. Postoperative period was uneventful and he improved in his symptoms. Eight years later, he presented with a difficulty in swallowing and occasional regurgitation of feeds of 2 months duration and oral extrusion of screw while having food. On oral examination, there was a defect in the posterior pharyngeal wall through which the upper end of plate with intact self-locking screw and socket of missed fixation screw was seen. This was confirmed on X-ray cervical spine. He underwent removal of the plate system and was fed through nasogastric tube and managed with appropriate antibiotics. This case is presented to report a very rare complication of anterior cervical plate fixation in the form of very late-onset dislodgement, migration of anterior cervical plate, and oral extrusion of screw through perforated posterior pharyngeal wall. Source

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