Rotterdam, Netherlands
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PubMed | The Intelligence Group, International Seaport Dredging, HDR, DHI and 7 more.
Type: | Journal: Advances in experimental medicine and biology | Year: 2015

The World Organization of Dredging Associations (WODA) has identified underwater sound as an environmental issue that needs further consideration. A WODA Expert Group on Underwater Sound (WEGUS) prepared a guidance paper in 2013 on dredging sound, including a summary of potential impacts on aquatic biota and advice on underwater sound monitoring procedures. The paper follows a risk-based approach and provides guidance for standardization of acoustic terminology and methods for data collection and analysis. Furthermore, the literature on dredging-related sounds and the effects of dredging sounds on marine life is surveyed and guidance on the management of dredging-related sound risks is provided.


News Article | February 17, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.co.uk

Production of salt is increasing to meet worldwide demand and many of the new salt production projects due on stream by 2020 will produce salt via solar recovery methods. Solar salt production already accounts for an estimated 40% of salt production worldwide in 2017. Essam Madbouly of Cristal Global and AT Kordy of Egyptian Salt and Minerals (EMISAL) will be talking about new investments in solar salt production at a conference organised by Roskill, a leader in a leader in international metals and minerals research: Roskill's Salt 2017 conference takes place March 28 to 29 at the Renaissance hotel in Dusseldorf, Germany. Historically, Germany served as a centre for European salt trade, and today this industry is still served worldwide by maritime dry bulk shipping. Denny Sabah of Maritime Strategies International will be giving his perspective on salt and dry bulk shipping market trends and outlook on the first day at the conference, in a session which will also include insights from Robert van Muiden of Rotterdam Bulk Logistics and Hugo du Mez of the Port of Rotterdam Authority. In 2016 there was significant growth in international salt trade, driven by low transportation rates following the collapse of the shipping industry since the global recession of 2008/09. Increased investment by salt producers in new sources of cost effective production will underpin growth in the chloralkali sector in Asia. Growth in salt consumption has been particularly strong in China, which is a net importer of salt despite its position as the largest salt producing country in the world. Competition within the salt industry, particularly over the lucrative and sporadic road de-icing market will continue to affect market shares. Graham Clarke, Operations Director of new entrant to the market, Sirius Minerals, will be describing at Salt 2017 how his company plans to take advantage of this market for salt. Per Nygaard, International Principal Manager for salt at Azelis, a leading de-icing salt distributor, will elaborate on how the de-icing salt supply chain works in Europe. According to Roskill, world salt revenues have achieved a steady annual average growth rate to 2017, despite the slowdown in chloralkali markets in recent years. The strongest regional growth in the medium term will continue to be in Asia, but the more mature markets of NAFTA and Europe are also growing. At the conference Roskill will aim to put raw material, regulatory and technology developments within the salt industry into context. The 15th edition of Roskill's global salt report, Salt 2016 Global Industry Markets & Outlook, was published in late 2016. Roskill reviewed the production plans of more than 300 salt production assets worldwide during the research for its 2016 report. Germany's K+S has retained its position as the largest producer in the world, fending off a hostile takeover bid and announcing two major expansion projects during 2015/16. As the cost of shipping salt across oceans has fallen, traditional European salt producers are finding that they have to compete with new suppliers from as far away as Australia, Mexico and Chile. Wouter Lox of EuSalt - the European salt producers' association, will be speaking at the conference about the regulatory and legal challenges that European salt producers face in 2016. Vladimir Sedivy, the President of Salt Partners, a Swiss engineering consultancy, will present a paper in the same session on what drives the salt and chloralkali industry in Europe. Chloralkali production is the largest end-use for salt. Chlorine is the raw material for the production of numerous organic chlorine compounds, the most important of which in terms of volume is ethylene dichloride, a chemical precursor to the 46Mtpy commodity polymer, PVC. Dr Jason Leadbitter of Inovyn Chlorvinyl will update delegates on Inovyn's sustainability programme for salt in PVC manufacture. Caustic soda also has a very wide range of end-uses including alumina manufacture, pulp and paper production, and chemical processing. Synthetic soda ash production is the next largest end-use for salt, and this in turn is mainly consumed in glass applications. Dr Henry Lau of Shihlien Chemical Industrial Jiangsu, a major Chinese soda ash producer, will be describing his company's new 300ktpy pharmaceutical grade salt facility at Salt 2017. Another major Asian chloralkali producer, Aditya Birla, will be putting forward an Indian perspective on chloralkali trends. The USA remained by far the largest destination for salt shipments in 2016. Chile remained the main supplier to the USA in 2016, supplying an estimated 4.5Mt, mainly for road de-icing applications. Australian salt exports in 2016 were an estimated 8.5Mt, maintaining its longstanding position as the world's largest salt exporter. However, this total was down on exports in 2015. Australian producers export salt to Japan, China, South Korea and Indonesia for use in the chemicals industry. This decrease in salt shipments from Australia to Asia during 2016 was partly due to increased competition from Indian exports. Between 2010 and 2015, Indian salt exports to China increased from 0.4Mt to 2.3Mt, averaging 42% py growth. Devsalt, a major Indian producer of solar salt, will be describing the current status of the Indian salt industry in 2017 at the conference and explaining how Indian producers have achieved such spectacular growth in exports. Long distance trade is a critical topic for the salt industry and this conference brings together salt producers, specifiers, traders, end-users and equipment manufacturers from every continent. The Roskill conference provides an international forum to debate the current technical issues and market developments (www.roskill.com). As low shipping rates facilitate the movement of salt as never before, these industry players need a regular opportunity to meet and discuss business. https://roskill.com/salt2017/


PubMed | Port of Rotterdam Authority and Applied Scientific Research
Type: | Journal: Advances in experimental medicine and biology | Year: 2015

The underwater sound produced during construction of the Port of Rotterdam harbor extension (Maasvlakte 2) was measured, with emphasis on the contribution of the trailing suction hopper dredgers during their various activities: dredging, transport, and discharge of sediment. Measured source levels of the dredgers, estimated source levels of other shipping, and time-dependent position data from a vessel-tracking system were used as input for a propagation model to generate dynamic sound maps. Various scenarios were studied to assess the risk of possible effects of the sound from dredging activities on marine fauna, specifically on porpoises, seals, and fish.


Peters D.J.,Royal Haskoning | Broos E.J.,Port of Rotterdam Authority | Gresnigt A.M.,Technical University of Delft | Van Es S.H.J.,Technical University of Delft
Proceedings of the International Offshore and Polar Engineering Conference | Year: 2015

Spirally welded tubes are an economic solution if large diameter tubular piles are to be applied, e.g. in combined walls to resist ground and water pressure in harbours and support the vertical loads from the quay. In order to quantify the effect of internal soil on bending resistance and post-buckling behaviour of the pipe a test program with 24 pipe bending tests has been carried out and new design rules were developed for the Dutch Handbook Quay Walls (CUR, 2013). In the paper a summary is given of the motivation and the results of the tests. The test programme comprised spirally welded pipes with diameter to wall thickness ratios between 72 and 119, steel grades up to X65, with and without sand-fill. The test results are analysed applying analytical modelling. The sand-fill has a limited positive effect on the initiation of local buckling. The big difference is the post-buckling behaviour, where the sand-fill resists the development of the buckles which results in a significantly less steep decline of the bending moment capacity compared to tubes without sand-fill. Copyright © 2015 by the International Society of Offshore and Polar Engineers (ISOPE).


de Langen P.W.,Port of Rotterdam Authority | de Langen P.W.,TU Eindhoven | van den Berg R.,Port of Rotterdam Authority | Willeumier A.,Port of Rotterdam Authority
Maritime Policy and Management | Year: 2012

This paper describes in detail the award process of the concession for a large container terminal in the port of Rotterdam. This process can be termed competitive bidding, and differs from a tender because of the frequent interaction between the Port of Rotterdam Authority and the candidates. The competitive bidding process is a potentially attractive form in which to grant concessions, if there is sufficient interest in the concession as well as an impartial and trusted Port Authority with the capability to manage the process. Criteria that foster sustainable port development can be incorporated into the bidding process. In the Rotterdam case, modal split requirements were introduced, a novelty in the port industry. © 2012 Taylor & Francis.


Van den Berg R.,Port of Rotterdam Authority | De Langen P.W.,TU Eindhoven
International Journal of Logistics Research and Applications | Year: 2016

The transport sector accounts for 25% of the global CO2 emissions. All firms in the transport industry share a responsibility for this environmental impact. This paper explores, as one of the first, the attitude of both shippers and forwarders, as the main purchasers of transport services, towards environmental sustainability in the sourcing of transport services. Based on a literature review we develop several hypotheses and test those through a survey among shippers and forwarders in the Netherlands. We conclude that shippers focus more on sustainability than forwarders, the size of shippers has a positive influence on the demand for transparency of the environmental performance, explicit sustainability targets have a positive influence on the demand for sustainable solutions and the vast majority of shippers and forwarders expect an increased importance of sustainable purchasing. © 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group


Van den Berg R.,Port of Rotterdam Authority | De Langen P.W.,TU Eindhoven
Maritime Policy and Management | Year: 2014

The two main value propositions in international container transport are 'port-to-port' services and 'door-to-door' services. In port-to-port services, buyers 'just' purchase maritime transport from a shipping line. Door-to-door services comprise the total transport chain and include land-based transport. Carriers as well as forwarders offer these door-to-door services. In this paper we provide a qualitative assessment of an emerging third value proposition that is centred around inland terminals (ILTs). Such a value proposition consists of transport up to the ILT, and may have advantages over port-to-port services, such as better leverage of scale economies, better repositioning of empty containers and better alignment with the business model of forwarders. This paper conceptually and empirically explores such a value proposition. © 2014 © 2014 Taylor & Francis.


Taneja P.,Technical University of Delft | Walkert W.E.,Technical University of Delft | Ligteringent H.,Technical University of Delft | Schuylenburg M.V.,Port of Rotterdam Authority | Plas R.V.,Port of Rotterdam Authority
Maritime Policy and Management | Year: 2010

The evolving function of a port, and many logistical, technological, and economic uncertainties under which it must operate, make the planning and design of these complex socio-technical infrastructures very challenging. A Master Plan of a port is the instrument by which the port's (expansion) strategy in the marketplace is defined. Therefore, a Port Master Plan needs to be dynamic and responsive to all external developments during its lifetime. The existing Master Planning approach is static and as a result it is poorly equipped to deal with many uncertainties in the port and shipping industry. A new approach is required. This article proposes an adaptive approach to planning that combines elements of Assumption-Based Planning (ABP), developed in the early 1990s, and Adaptive Policymaking (APM), developed in 2001. It identifies in a structured way the uncertainty in an existing plan, and subsequently improves its robustness and adaptability through taking actions either in the planning stage or by preparing actions in advance that can be taken as the uncertainties resolve themselves. The article illustrates this approach by applying it to the current plan for Maasvlakte 2, the ongoing port expansion of Rotterdam in The Netherlands. The value of this proactive and dynamic approach lies in its manner of dealing with uncertainties. It leads planners to recognize vulnerabilities in a plan and incorporate strategies for dealing with them, adapting to new developments, and building in capacity for taking advantage of new opportunities. The objective of using this adaptive approach is to realize a Master Plan robust across many futures, so that the port can meet the requirements of its stakeholders during its entire lifetime. © 2010 Taylor & Francis.


Van der Lugt L.M.,Erasmus University Rotterdam | Rodrigues S.B.,Erasmus University Rotterdam | Van den Berg R.,Port of Rotterdam Authority
Journal of Transport Geography | Year: 2014

This paper explores changes in the strategic orientation of port authorities and terminal operators towards the hinterland network in the Ports of Rotterdam and Barcelona. Port authorities and terminal operators are economically, institutionally and geographically related organizations. The argument here is that such organizations experience a mutually influential and interactive effect in their strategy over time. The research explores the evolution of the market, institutional and governance forces behind these organizations' strategic orientation, while acknowledging their interdependence and interrelationship. To that end, it builds a conceptual framework analysing these organizations' strategies in different points in time. It draws upon firms and port theories to design a co-evolutionary framework, which is later refined with insights gained from an empirical study of the port context. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.


Van den Berg R.,Port of Rotterdam Authority | De Langen P.W.,Port of Rotterdam Authority | De Langen P.W.,TU Eindhoven
Maritime Policy and Management | Year: 2015

The two main value propositions in international container transport are ‘port-to-port’ services and ‘door-to-door’ services. In port-to-port services, buyers ‘just’ purchase maritime transport from a shipping line. Door-to-door services comprise the total transport chain and include land-based transport. Carriers as well as forwarders offer these door-to-door services. In this paper we provide a qualitative assessment of an emerging third value proposition that is centred around inland terminals (ILTs). Such a value proposition consists of transport up to the ILT, and may have advantages over port-to-port services, such as better leverage of scale economies, better repositioning of empty containers and better alignment with the business model of forwarders. This paper conceptually and empirically explores such a value proposition. © 2014 Taylor & Francis.

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