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Dahlonega, GA, United States

Patent
Polymer Aging Concepts, Inc. | Date: 2012-07-06

A low tack viscoelastomeric gel material formed by combining, by percent weight: about 50% to about 80% of a Polyol; about 3% to about 15% of an isocyanate; about 15% to about 40% of an oil; about 0.1% to about 1% of a catalyst; and about 0% to about 1% of a release agent. Support structures are also provided with a layer of low tack viscoelastomeric gel material. Further aspects also include methods of making the low tack viscoelastomeric gel material and methods of making support structures with a layer of low tack viscoelastomeric gel material.


Trademark
Polymer Aging Concepts, Inc. | Date: 2012-04-03

Electronic sensors and electronic sensor readers that provide condition monitoring for a wide variety of products, namely, sensors for providing warning of excessive aging of products.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 99.75K | Year: 2007

The reliability and economic viability of Generation IV nuclear power plants would be significantly enhanced by a simple, low-cost maintenance technology that can predict the degradation of insulation in electrical-power-system components, such as motors, generators and transformers. Current methods require significant operator training for interpretation, and have limited capabilities of predicting remaining life. Other modeling approaches, such as time-temperature integration, require a large number of environmental sensors for sensing each environmental stressor, and do not reduce complexity and wiring as required of next-generation nuclear power plants. This project will demonstrate the feasibility of a new conductive composite degradation sensor, called AgeAlert, to continuously monitor the condition of the insulation systems of electrical components. Because this tiny in situ sensor will be made of the same polymeric components as the insulation itself, it will respond in exactly the same way as the component insulation system, improving monitoring accuracy and allowing repair or replacement of the component before failure. Commercial Applications and other Benefits as described by the awardee: AgeAlert sensors could be used to monitor the degradation of virtually any polymeric material, including wire and cable systems; seals and gaskets; hybrid automobile motor/generators, tires, and belts; and aerospace composite structures. Since the sensors are passive and respond to degradation effects without power, they can be incorporated into passive Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) devices to make smart labels ¿ not only would such labels identity an item, they also would automatically adjust the shelf-life.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 750.00K | Year: 2008

Component failures resulting from degradation within insulation systems represents a significant contribution to reliability and cost issues facing the nuclear power industry. For example, the Electric Power Research Institute found that 37% of motor failures were due to winding failures, many of which involve failure of the insulation system. Although a number of visual, tactile, or electrical tests exist for detecting and locating insulation problems, current methods are complex and expensive, and require considerable expertise, or they are subjective and require shutdowns and/or disassembly. This project will develop a new sensing technology, called AgeAlert, which will provide the first direct measurement of insulation degradation, both in situ and in real time. In this approach, a tiny low-cost sensor ¿ installed in the windings of a motor, generator, or transformer ¿ responds to actual environmental conditions in the motor and accurately correlates to insulation degradation. Because AgeAlert sensors are conductive composites made with the same insulation resin of the insulation being monitored, the sensors respond in exactly the same manner, and under exactly the same conditions, as the insulation itself. Phase I developed prototype AgeAlert sensors and demonstrated feasibility by accurately tracking the insulation in a reactor coolant pump motor. In Phase II, expanded aging trials will be conducted on additional insulation systems in thermal, radiation, and humidity environments. The prototype sensor will be tested in a realistic nuclear component test bed, and an integrated system design will be completed for the incorporation of AgeAlert sensors in plant-wide condition-monitoring systems. Commercial Applications and Other Benefits as described by the awardee: The AgeAlert technology should reduce the cost of screening individual electrical components for insulation deterioration and provide advance warning of insulation degradation. In addition to the application to the nuclear power industry, the sensors should be applicable to degradation monitoring of virtually any polymeric material, opening possibilities for use in wire and cable systems, seals and gaskets, hybrid automobile motor/generators, tires, belts, and aerospace composite structures.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 749.99K | Year: 2010

Insulation system degradation resulting in component failure represents a significant contribution to reliability and cost issues facing the nuclear power industry. For example, the Electric Power Research Institute found that 37% of motor failures were due to winding failures, many of which involve failure of the insulation system. Although there are a number of visual, tactile or electrical tests helpful in detecting insulation problems, there is no current in-situ sensor which continuously tracks the environmentally driven degradation of the insulation. A new degradation sensing technology called AgeAlert, developed by Polymer Aging Concepts, Inc. provides the first in-situ sensor for measurement of environmentally induced insulation degradation in real time. This tiny, low cost sensor installed in the windings of a motor or insulation of a cable responds to actual environmental conditions and accurately predicts remaining insulation life. The Phase I project demonstrated feasibility for use of advanced nanotechnology materials as conductive fillers in AgeAlert sensors. This is important because the resulting improvements in both performance and durability of the sensors optimize use in critical applications such as electrical wiring and equipment in nuclear power plants. The proposed research under this STTR Phase II project will demonstrate the improved performance from nanotechnology materials such as carbon nanotubes (CNT) in prototypes made for several wire and cable and motor insulation systems planned for Generation IV nuclear power plants. The tasks of this proposal will increase commercial viability of AgeAlert technology by improving the performance and durability of AgeAlert sensors to meet strict durability test requirements in the nuclear industry. It will open up additional markets for this new class of simple, low-cost condition monitoring sensors for demanding applications such as remote monitoring of off-shore wind turbines and solar applications where electrical components are subjected to extreme environmental conditions. Commercial Applications and other Benefits as described by the awardee: Commercialization of AgeAlert technology promotes green technologies by reducing material and energy resources associated with unplanned shutdowns and unnecessary equipment replacement. In the future, AgeAlert sensors can be used to monitor degradation of a wide range of degradable products including tires, aerospace composites, propellants, and even food and pharmaceutical products. Since the sensors are passive and respond to degradation effects without power, they can be incorporated into passive Radio Frequency Identification devices to make

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