State College, PA, United States

PolyK Technologies, LLC

www.polyktech.com
State College, PA, United States
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Grant
Agency: National Science Foundation | Branch: | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 747.87K | Year: 2016

The broader impact/commercial potential of this project is to manufacture an advanced hybrid energy harvester that can enable broad deployment of wireless sensor networks. Self-sustainable uninterrupted low-cost power supply with small size is in urgent need for internet of things, portable electric devices, wireless sensor networks, infrastructure health monitoring, active control, and battleground soldier support. Scavenging ambient energy from environment to power these devices can eliminate the cost of replacing batteries, particularly in remote environment. The hybrid energy harvesters developed in this project will significantly improve the power output and response dynamic frequency, therefore provide sufficient power to many such devices. The high power density will also enable more frequent data acquisition and transmission of such sensor networks, and promote more ubiquitous deployment of advanced sensor networks. The automatic manufacturing process will enable their adoption by various customers including internet of things. This Small Business Technology Transfer Research (STTR) Phase 2 project will develop manufacturing processes for advanced hybrid energy harvesters. Although piezoelectric energy harvesters have found broad applications, their power density and mechanical-electrical conversion efficiency are still low, with values at microwatts to milliwatt and 100 mW and conversion efficiency at > 40% by using the more efficient d33 piezoelectric mode and with reduced stiffness in a curved structure that can efficiently transfer the energy from the vibration source to the active piezoelectric materials. The Phase II project will be focused on developing low-cost innovative automatic manufacturing process to enable their practical applications in commercial and industrial market.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 1.05M | Year: 2016

The Phase I project has demonstrated that high energy density of 1.6 J/cc can be achieved in large size film capacitors with microsecond discharge speed and long DC lifetime. Advanced electrode technology may further improve the energy density in large size capacitors. This SBIR Phase II project will develop and improve manufacturing technologies and capacitor design to achieve high energy density of 2.0 J/cc, DC lifetime >1,000 hours, and microsecond discharge speed in 500 uF/10 kV packaged capacitors.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 225.00K | Year: 2014

This Small Business Technology Transfer Research (STTR) Phase I will develop advanced hybrid energy harvester to provide power for wireless sensor network systems. Although piezoelectric energy harvesters have found broad applications, their power density and mechanical-electrical conversion efficiency are still low, with values at microwatts to milliwatt and <10%, respectively since they primarily operate at the ?d31? mode of the piezoelectric transducer and the mechanical impedance mismatch between the vibration source and the harvesting device. It is known that the ?d33? mode in many piezoelectric materials can generate 2~3 times more energy than the ?d31? mode. In this project, novel hybrid piezoelectric harvesters will be designed by an integrated approach and uniquely constructed to combine both ?d31? mode and ?d33? mode in a single device. This hybrid design can also reduce the harvester stiffness so the vibration can be effectively transferred from the source to the device. Therefore, they will have significantly higher power density and conversion efficiency at >100 mW and >40%, respectively.

The broader impact/commercial potential of this project is to develop advanced hybrid energy harvester that can enable broad deployment of wireless sensor networks. Self-sustainable power supply is in urgent need for portable electric devices, wireless sensor networks, infrastructure health monitoring, active control, and battleground soldier support. Scavenging ambient energy from environment to power these devices can eliminate the cost of replacing batteries, particularly in remote environment. The hybrid energy harvesters developed in this project will significantly improve the power output and response dynamic frequency, therefore provide sufficient power to many such devices. The high power density will also enable more frequent data acquisition and transmission of such sensor networks, and promote more ubiquitous deployment of advanced sensor networks.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2014

This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase I project will develop and commercialize advanced film capacitors with high energy density, high power density, and high thermal stability. Current dc bus capacitors in many medium and high power systems are dominated by polypropylene (PP) film capacitors which were developed more than 60 years ago and they have low thermal stability. This project will develop prototype capacitors using proprietary three-phase nanodielectric compositions combining high thermal stability, high dielectric constant, low dielectric loss, as well as low cost.

The broader impact/commercial potential of this project is development of cost-competitive advanced electrostatic capacitors that are critical components in many pulsed power and power electronics. These advanced capacitors will be able to minimize the capacitor size, weight and reduce the material and maintenance cost of power inverters in hybrid and plug-in electric vehicles, smart grid, oil/gas/geothermal down-hole drilling and exploration, wind turbine generators, grid-tied photovoltaic, and many other energy and military systems. The success of this project will facilitate the broad adoption of advanced switch technologies which can save the electricity energy loss by 30%.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: STTR PHASE II | Award Amount: 755.86K | Year: 2016

The broader impact/commercial potential of this project is to manufacture an advanced hybrid energy harvester that can enable broad deployment of wireless sensor networks. Self-sustainable uninterrupted low-cost power supply with small size is in urgent need for internet of things, portable electric devices, wireless sensor networks, infrastructure health monitoring, active control, and battleground soldier support. Scavenging ambient energy from environment to power these devices can eliminate the cost of replacing batteries, particularly in remote environment. The hybrid energy harvesters developed in this project will significantly improve the power output and response dynamic frequency, therefore provide sufficient power to many such devices. The high power density will also enable more frequent data acquisition and transmission of such sensor networks, and promote more ubiquitous deployment of advanced sensor networks. The automatic manufacturing process will enable their adoption by various customers including internet of things.

This Small Business Technology Transfer Research (STTR) Phase 2 project will develop manufacturing processes for advanced hybrid energy harvesters. Although piezoelectric energy harvesters have found broad applications, their power density and mechanical-electrical conversion efficiency are still low, with values at microwatts to milliwatt and <10%, respectively since they primarily operate at the d31 mode of the piezoelectric transducer and the mechanical impedance mismatch between the vibration source and the harvesting device. The Phase I project successfully demonstrated that the advanced hybrid energy harvesting device can provide significantly higher power density at > 100 mW and conversion efficiency at > 40% by using the more efficient d33 piezoelectric mode and with reduced stiffness in a curved structure that can efficiently transfer the energy from the vibration source to the active piezoelectric materials. The Phase II project will be focused on developing low-cost innovative automatic manufacturing process to enable their practical applications in commercial and industrial market.


Grant
Agency: National Science Foundation | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 659.56K | Year: 2015

The broader impact/commercial potential of this Small Business Innovation Research Phase II project would be commercialization of a new high temperature energy storage technology that can enable the broad adoption of advanced high-efficient power management systems in renewable energy sections. This project will develop cost-competitive advanced electrostatic capacitors that are critical components in many pulsed power and power electronics. These advanced capacitors will be able to minimize the capacitor size, weight and reduce the material and maintenance cost of power inverters in hybrid and plug-in electric vehicles, smart grid, oil/gas/geothermal down-hole drilling and exploration, wind turbine generators, grid-tied photovoltaic, and many other energy and military systems. The success of this project will facilitate the broad adoption of advanced energy efficient switch technologies. The technical objectives of this Phase II research project are to develop and commercialize advanced film capacitors with high energy density, high power density, and high thermal stability. Current dc bus capacitors in many medium and high power systems are dominated by polypropylene (PP) film capacitors which were developed more than 60 years ago and they have low thermal stability. This project will develop prototype capacitors using proprietary three-component nanodielectric compositions combining high thermal stability, high dielectric constant, low dielectric loss, as well as low cost. The success of this project is built upon our integrated and interdisciplinary approach that combines integrated computational material engineering (ICME/EDV), nanodielectric material with balanced thermal, electrical, and mechanical performance, inexpensive film production, and advanced capacitor design.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 659.56K | Year: 2015

The broader impact/commercial potential of this Small Business Innovation Research Phase II project would be commercialization of a new high temperature energy storage technology that can enable the broad adoption of advanced high-efficient power management systems in renewable energy sections. This project will develop cost-competitive advanced electrostatic capacitors that are critical components in many pulsed power and power electronics. These advanced capacitors will be able to minimize the capacitor size, weight and reduce the material and maintenance cost of power inverters in hybrid and plug-in electric vehicles, smart grid, oil/gas/geothermal down-hole drilling and exploration, wind turbine generators, grid-tied photovoltaic, and many other energy and military systems. The success of this project will facilitate the broad adoption of advanced energy efficient switch technologies.

The technical objectives of this Phase II research project are to develop and commercialize advanced film capacitors with high energy density, high power density, and high thermal stability. Current dc bus capacitors in many medium and high power systems are dominated by polypropylene (PP) film capacitors which were developed more than 60 years ago and they have low thermal stability. This project will develop prototype capacitors using proprietary three-component nanodielectric compositions combining high thermal stability, high dielectric constant, low dielectric loss, as well as low cost. The success of this project is built upon our integrated and interdisciplinary approach that combines integrated computational material engineering (ICME/EDV), nanodielectric material with balanced thermal, electrical, and mechanical performance, inexpensive film production, and advanced capacitor design.


Grant
Agency: National Science Foundation | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2014

This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase I project will develop and commercialize advanced film capacitors with high energy density, high power density, and high thermal stability. Current dc bus capacitors in many medium and high power systems are dominated by polypropylene (PP) film capacitors which were developed more than 60 years ago and they have low thermal stability. This project will develop prototype capacitors using proprietary three-phase nanodielectric compositions combining high thermal stability, high dielectric constant, low dielectric loss, as well as low cost. The broader impact/commercial potential of this project is development of cost-competitive advanced electrostatic capacitors that are critical components in many pulsed power and power electronics. These advanced capacitors will be able to minimize the capacitor size, weight and reduce the material and maintenance cost of power inverters in hybrid and plug-in electric vehicles, smart grid, oil/gas/geothermal down-hole drilling and exploration, wind turbine generators, grid-tied photovoltaic, and many other energy and military systems. The success of this project will facilitate the broad adoption of advanced switch technologies which can save the electricity energy loss by 30%.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 80.00K | Year: 2015

We propose to develop polymer-based negative-positive-zero (NPO) capacitors by combining our proprietary dielectric formulations, film processing technology, and unique capacitor design. As polymer film capacitors have intrinsically high dielectric breakdown strength than multilayer ceramic capacitors (MLCC), our capacitors will be able to provide high operation voltage > 80 kV. The dielectric formulation and capacitor design will be optimized to minimize the equivalent series resistance (ESR) to achieve the high speed discharging. The self-healing process of polymer film will enable the reliable operation of the capacitors at high electric field close to its breakdown strength without failure, therefore, provide energy density higher than 1 J/cc.


Grant
Agency: National Science Foundation | Branch: | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 225.00K | Year: 2014

This Small Business Technology Transfer Research (STTR) Phase I will develop advanced hybrid energy harvester to provide power for wireless sensor network systems. Although piezoelectric energy harvesters have found broad applications, their power density and mechanical-electrical conversion efficiency are still low, with values at microwatts to milliwatt and<10%, respectively since they primarily operate at the ?d31? mode of the piezoelectric transducer and the mechanical impedance mismatch between the vibration source and the harvesting device. It is known that the ?d33? mode in many piezoelectric materials can generate 2~3 times more energy than the ?d31? mode. In this project, novel hybrid piezoelectric harvesters will be designed by an integrated approach and uniquely constructed to combine both ?d31? mode and ?d33? mode in a single device. This hybrid design can also reduce the harvester stiffness so the vibration can be effectively transferred from the source to the device. Therefore, they will have significantly higher power density and conversion efficiency at>100 mW and>40%, respectively. The broader impact/commercial potential of this project is to develop advanced hybrid energy harvester that can enable broad deployment of wireless sensor networks. Self-sustainable power supply is in urgent need for portable electric devices, wireless sensor networks, infrastructure health monitoring, active control, and battleground soldier support. Scavenging ambient energy from environment to power these devices can eliminate the cost of replacing batteries, particularly in remote environment. The hybrid energy harvesters developed in this project will significantly improve the power output and response dynamic frequency, therefore provide sufficient power to many such devices. The high power density will also enable more frequent data acquisition and transmission of such sensor networks, and promote more ubiquitous deployment of advanced sensor networks.

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