Pollution Engineering

Engineering, United States

Pollution Engineering

Engineering, United States

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Fisher S.,Pollution Engineering
Pollution Engineering | Year: 2010

The EPA has released its second round of chemicals and substances to be tested for endocrine disruption. After testing, those that are found to have a significant effect on humans or fauna (lower standard) will most likely be subject to regulation. The agency printed the list of chemicals to be tested under the Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program (EDSP) in the Wednesday, 11/17/2010, Federal Register. The second list of chemicals expands the EDSP to include all pesticides, required by FFDCA, and adds priority drinking water chemicals into the program for screening. Companies that produce, manufacture, use, consume, work with, or import substances included on the second EDSP list should keep a close eye on the agency's testing schedule and results. The list includes 1,1,1,2-tetrachloroethane, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, 1,1,2-trichloroethane, 1,1-dichloroethane, and 1-butanol, aniline, methanol, and hexane.


Atkinson W.,Pollution Engineering
Pollution Engineering | Year: 2014

Jack Leonard, the president of the Environmental Management Institute, offers three recommendations that will help to keep costs low in wastewater treatment. First, regardless of which technologies companies use for wastewater treatment, one thing they should all focus attention on is the potential for automating and tracking these processes. Second, companies must treat the water as close to where it is generated as possible. Third, when appropriate, consider technologies that focus on individual contaminants. One company offering industrial wastewater treatment technologies is Aquatech International Corp., which provides water purification systems and wastewater treatment technologies. One technology offered by Aquatech is an enhanced MBBR (moving bed bioreactor) media. It is a biological process utilizing an innovative media that is able to achieve water quality compliance in challenging applications, such as refinery and petrochemical effluents. The company offers a hybrid zero liquid discharge (ZLD) process that combines the best of membrane treatment and thermal equipment.


Bigham R.,Pollution Engineering
Pollution Engineering | Year: 2010

California air regulators voted unanimously to toughen what were already the nation's toughest standards for renewable energy by increasing the requirement to supply energy produced from renewable sources to 33% within a decade. Governor Schwarzenegger is in favor of the increased demand as a way to meet the 2006 global warming law requirements to lower greenhouse gas production for the state. The new rule would permit utilities to purchase renewable energy credits from outside the state to meet the 33% requirement. Currently, utilities must supply all of the energy production within the state to meet the 20% demand.


Fisher S.,Pollution Engineering
Pollution Engineering | Year: 2010

The EPA has submitted its final rule in the Federal Register promulgating significant new use rules under section 5(a)(2) of the TSCA for 25 chemical substances, including formaldehyde and benzoic acid, which were the subject of premanufacture notices. This action requires persons who intend to manufacture, import, or process any of these 25 chemical substances for an activity that is designated as a significant new use by this rule to notify the agency at least 90 days before commencing that activity.


Fisher S.,Pollution Engineering
Pollution Engineering | Year: 2010

The EPA has issued voluntary information requests to nine natural gas service companies regarding the process known as hydraulic fracturing. The agency is seeking information to determine whether hydraulic fracturing has an impact on drinking water and the public health of Americans living in the vicinity of hydraulic fracturing wells. The EPA has requested the information be provided on a voluntary basis within 30 days, and has asked companies to respond within seven days to inform the agency whether they will provide all of the information sought. The initial results of the study will be announced in late 2012. The EPA will identify additional information for industry to provide - including information on fluid disposal practices and geological features - that will help the agency carry out the study.


Fisher S.,Pollution Engineering
Pollution Engineering | Year: 2010

The EPA announced its final revisions to the agency's procedures for developing Enforceable Consent Agreements (ECA) to produce test data under the TSCA. The main features of the ECA process that the EPA is changing include when and how to initiate negotiations and inserting a firm deadline at which negotiations will terminate. The EPA is also deleting, modifying, or consolidating several sections of 40 CFR part 790 to place the ECA provisions in one section and the Interagency Testing Committee provisions in a separate section, to make it clearer that there is one ECA negotiation procedure applicable to all circumstances when an ECA would be appropriate, and to make conforming changes in other sections that reference the ECA procedures. The final rule takes effect on 10/18/2010.


Bigham R.,Pollution Engineering
Pollution Engineering | Year: 2010

Dr. Samantha Joye, professor of marine sciences at the University of Georgia, has discovered layers of oil deposits that have escaped the BP blown out well. These oil deposits appeared to be flocculated. While many of the deposits they encountered were millimeters in thickness, when they dropped a multicorer into a valley formation that could be a natural collection point for sediments about 16 nautical mi from the wellhead, they recovered samples with up to nearly 3 cm of the fluffy oily deposits.


Fisher S.,Pollution Engineering
Pollution Engineering | Year: 2011

The Department of Energy has proposed to amend its existing regulations governing compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) through the January 3, 2011, Federal Register notice. The majority of the changes are proposed for the categorical exclusions provisions contained in its NEPA Implementing Procedures, with a small number of related changes proposed for other provisions. These proposed changes are intended to better align the department's regulations, particularly its categorical exclusions, with DOE's current activities and recent experiences, and to update the provisions with respect to current technologies and regulatory requirements. The DOE is updating its basic NEPA regulations (10 CFR part 1021), primarily with changes to subpart D and with a few changes to subpart C. The majority of changes are proposed for the categorical exclusion provisions at 10 CFR part 1021, subpart D, appendices A and B, with a small number of related changes proposed for other provisions within subparts C and D.


Bigham R.,Pollution Engineering
Pollution Engineering | Year: 2011

The EPA has delivered on a promise to quickly develop guidance documents for monitoring hexavalent chromium in drinking water. EPA Administrator Lisa P. Jackson met with members of the Senate before Christmas to brief them on the available information regarding a problem that has been reported by researchers that there may be levels of the chemical currently in our drinking water that could present a danger particularly to children and infants. The enhanced monitoring guidance provides recommendations on where facilities should collect samples and how often they should be collected, along with analytical methods for laboratory testing. The science behind hexchrome is evolving. The agency regularly re-evaluates drinking water standards and, based on new science for the chemical, has already begun a rigorous and comprehensive review of its health effects. In September 2010, the agency released a draft of the scientific review for public comment.


Foster J.,Pollution Engineering
Pollution Engineering | Year: 2013

Five more popular and prominent myths surrounding the volatile organic compounds (VOC) are discussed. There is a myth that VOCs are mostly man-made. It is estimated that anthropogenic sources emit about 142 teragrams of carbon per year in the form of VOCs. Plants produce the majority of VOCs, the main compound being isoprene. Animals, microbes and fungi, such as molds, produce the remainder. Another myth that all VOCs are equally bad is also untrue. Because the compounds are so varied, different VOCs have different toxicities and this is what determines whether a specific VOC is bad. It is quite easy for VOCs to build up within an indoor environment and become a health hazard. There is no such thing as zero VOCs, as opposed to the myth that all zero VOC products have none. Companies must disclose that the zero VOC claims apply only to the base paint, and that depending on the consumer's color choice, the VOC level may rise.

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