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News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: co.newswire.com

Fifth annual Youth for Human Rights South Asia Summit served as the first stage of the annual Youth for Human Rights World Educational Tour and brought together concerned human rights advocates from throughout the region. Some 200 human rights advocates gathered at the India Habitat Centre in Delhi, March 22, for the 5th annual South Asia Human Rights Summit of Youth for Human Rights International. The group, which seeks full implementation of the U.N. Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR), emphasizes education as the key to accomplishing reform. The Summit, held in Lucknow and Nepal in previous years, also marked the launch of the 14th annual Youth for Human Rights International (YHRI). Special guests included Founder and President of Youth for Human Rights International, Dr. Mary Shuttleworth; YHRI South Asia President Andrew Chalmers, retired judge and Chief Secretary to the President of India’s National Human Rights Commission, C.K. Chaturvedi; State Coordinator of Police Research, Training and Policy and Superintendent of Madhya Pradesh State Police Academy, Vineet Kapoor; and Indian humanitarian and founder of Earth Saviours Foundation, Ravi Kalra. Also attending were delegates, volunteers, partners and friends from across India, Nepal and Bangladesh. The Summit began March 22 with a conference in which youth delegates shared the results of their human rights activities over the past year. Their enthusiasm and passion was contagious, with young and old alike inspired to redouble their work to bring about peace and tolerance through human rights education. The following day, a standing room only crowd filled the conference room at the International Youth Hostel in Delhi. They learned how training on the Youth for Human Rights educational materials has caused a major shift in police attitudes and interaction with the community. Day three was a planning session, with key YHRI volunteers from academia, law, media, IT and business set goals and targets for the coming year to greatly expand YHRI as a national movement in India and across South Asia. Youth for Human Rights is one of the many humanitarian and social betterment initiatives supported by the Church of Scientology and Scientologists in alignment with the vision of Scientology Founder L. Ron Hubbard who stated, “It is vital that all thinking men urge upon their governments sweeping reforms in the field of human rights.”


Dispute Over 'Fearless Girl' and 'Charging Bull' Statues Kevin L Smith Dean of Libraries, University of Kansas University of Kansas Smith can discuss the dispute over the "Fearless Girl" and "Charging Bull" statues in New York, the associated copyrights for each, copyright law and intellectual property: "This case is especially interesting since it involves a relatively new provision of the copyright act, the Visual Artists' Rights Act of 1990, which secures some specific 'moral rights' for a limited group of visual artists. Interpretation of VARA has been difficult for the courts, and this case could really push on the issue of what a right of integrity, not recognized in any other part of U.S. copyright law, really entails. How much, we might ask, should an artist be able to control the meaning of his or her own work?" Contact: Mike Krings, mkrings@ku.edu Supreme Court: Trinity Lutheran v. Pauley Daniel Conkle Professor Indiana University's Maurer School of Law "The Supreme Court in recent decades has moved steadily toward a 'neutrality' understanding of the First Amendment's Establishment Clauses. Under this approach, the government generally is free to include religious organizations in otherwise general programs of funding, for example, through voucher programs for private schools. At the same time, in the interest of federalism, the Court has permitted states, applying state constitutional law, to enforce a stricter separation of church and state. Missouri has denied funding for the church playground based upon a state constitutional provision. But by denying the funding the state has effectively discriminated against church-sponsored daycares, presenting the question of whether the state constitutional provision itself violates the Free Exercise Clause of the First Amendment," says Conkle. "The question is whether the First Amendment requires neutrality between religious and nonreligious organizations, and if so, then the state constitutional provision will have to give way. Many state constitutions include provisions similar to Missouri's, so as a result, the Court's decision could have broad implications." Conkle is available to comment on the oral arguments in Trinity Lutheran v. Pauley (4/19). According to Conkle, the case raises important issues, not only about church-state separation, but also about federalism and the intersection of state and federal constitutional law. An expert on the intersection of constitutional law and religion, Conkle is the author of Constitutional Law: The Religion Clauses, which provides a theoretical and conceptual framework for understanding and evaluating the components of the Supreme Court's constitutional doctrine. His research addresses constitutional law and theory, religious liberty and the role of religion in American law, politics and public life. Conkle is also a Nelson Poynter Scholar at the Poynter Center for the Study of Ethics and American Institutions. Bio: http://www.law.indiana.edu/about/people/bio.php?name=conkle-daniel-o Website: http://www.law.indiana.edu Contact: Kemba Neptune, Kemba.neptune@finnpartners.com Relationship-Building Between Law Enforcement and the Community Bill Cassell Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice Campbellsville University Campbellsville, KY The importance of fostering understanding between police departments and the communities they serve through pro-active education and relationship building has never been more apparent. Says Cassell: "Community policing is an essential step in building trust between local departments and the communities they serve. In light of today's divisive political environment pro-active outreach is a necessary relationship building step. Unfortunately, race relations and secure communities have been in the spotlight lately. No strategy that encourages officers to target certain racial or ethnic groups is going to turn out to be positive in today's culture. Local cooperation, mutual respect and education about use of force policies are key to increasing understanding of not only police work but of each other." Cassell is a retired law enforcement and chief of police, with over two decades of experience, most of which spent teaching others. In his role as manager at the Kentucky Department of Criminal Justice he planned, implemented and managed instructors for all law enforcement officer trainings across the state. Cassell has numerous certifications, in topics such as situational leadership, ethics, and community vulnerability assessment methodology.  In addition to these topics he is available to discuss ethics in policing, leadership and communications training, and the role of social media and technology in police departments. Contact: Jessica Brown, Jessica.brown@finnpartners.com The Increased Strain on Law Enforcement Dr. Walter E. Stroupe Chair & Graduate Coordinator, Criminal Justice Department at West Virginia State University West Virginia State University Charleston, WV The current challenges and controversies surrounding law enforcement departments include issues related to officer shortage, inadequate agency budgets, and public policy impacting state and local police departments. Says Dr. Stroupe: "Lost in our national conversation over policing is that America's social services are coming under an enormous amount of stress. We are seeing increased burnout and retirements across the spectrum, from child protective service workers and teachers to emergency responders, and it has been up to law enforcement to pick up the slack without increased budgets and staff. These new roles in policing are leading to departments stretched thin, funding shortages, and an overall inability to improve services. What law enforcement agencies across the country need now are more dedicated funds so that they can effectively adjust to new responsibilities, recruit better officers, and implement long-term strategies for their communities."  Dr. Stroupe has over 20 years of law enforcement experience, including as a state Field Trooper, First Lieutenant, and retiring as the Assistant Director of Training at the West Virginia State Police Academy. He has been involved in developing and instructing criminal justice curriculum, including classes in race and gendered issues, domestic terrorism, sex crimes, and community oriented policing. Contact: Michael Timberlake, michaeltimberlake@finnpartners.com The Future of Learning is Personal Dr. Mickey Blackwell Assistant Professor and Graduate Program Coordinator, Department of Education West Virginia State University Charleston, WV With advancements in the use of technology and student data in the classroom, personalized education initiatives are the future. Says Dr. Blackwell "Personalized learning is where we are all headed. Soon every child will have their own plans, tailored tests, and teachers will know in real-time how that student is performing. It will be up to teachers, with the help of their administrators, to craft new materials, exercises, and tasks that can bring out the best in their students. Plus with the right support, states and districts can that embrace this learning revolution and will be better equipped to understand the strengths and weaknesses of their students and what teachers need to be successful in the classroom. This is an immense challenge for the education system, but it will pay endless dividends if fully supported by teachers, policymakers, and parents." Dr. Blackwell has over 30 years of experience in teaching and school administration, including serving as superintendent and principal at multiple schools, and currently is the executive director for the West Virginia Association for Elementary and Middle School Principals. Dr. Blackwell can speak to developing district-based curriculum goals and related staff development and staff, as well as the impact of public policy on state public school educators and school administrators.  Contact: Michael Timberlake, michaeltimberlake@finnpartners.com Preparing College Students for Life After Graduation Marjorie Silverman Chair and Associate Professor, Department of Internship Studies FIT (Fashion Institute of Technology) State University of New York New York, NY The transition of college students to the working world can be extremely challenging and stressful. Says Silverman: "The pressure on college students is at a dangerous level. Student debt, academic demands and a highly competitive job market leave college students overwhelmed, overstressed and exhausted. It has never been more urgent for higher education institutions to provide real-life experiential education that prepares the student for life after graduation." Working with leading employers in multiple industries, her areas of concentration include engaging students in an increasingly distracted world, expanding opportunities and commitments for non-traditional age students and innovative experiential educational programming. Silverman holds an M.A.in Organizational Psychology/Leadership from Columbia University. Contact: Ken Ferber, ferber@trueify.net Liberal Arts Education in the World of STEM David Harrity English Professor, School of Arts and Sciences Campbellsville University Campbellsville, KY "We continually hear about the important role STEM education plays in regards to job opportunities. I argue that the movement toward pragmatic STEM education is creating a loss in the way people approach debate, communication and creativity. I see STEM degrees and liberal arts degrees as equally important. The ability to express differing opinions and take part in active listening is becoming an increasingly important skill needed to be effective in our deeply divided communities today. The philosophy behind a liberal arts education is for students to be exposed to challenging and thought provoking ideas. If we are truly committed to seeing the next generation succeed, we need to place equal value on both STEM and liberal arts education." An established writer, Professor Harrity has authored a number of books focused on poetry and imagination's connection to theology. In addition to the creative writing process, Harrity can discuss the positive and negative links between social media and human connection as well as the cultural shift toward enhanced self-selection which means people are no longer forced to process information that is difficult, emotional or uncomfortable. Contact: Jessica Brown, Jessica.brown@finnpartners.com Following are links to job listings for staff and freelance writers, editors and producers. You can view these and more job listings on our Job Board: https://prnmedia.prnewswire.com/community/jobs/ Following are links to other news and resources we think you might find useful. If you have an item you think other reporters would be interested in and would like us to include in a future alert, please drop us a line at profnetalerts@prnewswire.com PROFNET is an exclusive service of PR Newswire. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/profnet-experts-available-on-copyright-law-education-and-technology-law-enforcement-more-300442067.html


ST. LOUIS, MO, November 30, 2016 /24-7PressRelease/ -- In the wake of the riots and police actions and responses connected to the Michael Brown shooting in Ferguson, Missouri, In the Line of Duty - the world leader in law enforcement video and internet training - has launched their newest online video training based on "best practices" learning from law enforcement leadership entitled "Ferguson/The Lessons Learned". Deemed "the Seminal Incident in 21st Century Law Enforcement", this exclusive video features a one-on-one interview with Chief of Police for the St. Louis County Police Department, Col. Jon M. Belmar. The 1hour 30-minute training video includes the very first and exclusive in-depth overview and analysis of the incident which has literally impacted law enforcement training and education nationally. In Col. Belmar's own words: "If you only saw it on TV, you have absolutely no idea of the enormity of the incident and law enforcement's (necessary) responses." Esteemed Film Reviewer for the International Law Enforcement Educators and Trainers Association (ILEETA) Journal - David Blake, M.Sc., F.S.A., C.C.I. - calls In the Line of Duty's new training video Ferguson/The Lessons Learned "an invaluable narrative" and "highly recommended": "In the Line of Duty's; Ferguson, The Lessons Learned - Part 1 is an exceptional debrief of law enforcement's actions following the officer involved shooting death of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo. The most captivating aspect is (that) the entire film circumscribes an in-depth interview with St. Louis County Police Chief Jon Belmar, who was at the center of the storm. Chief Belmar presents as an exemplary law enforcement executive who speaks candidly on every aspect of the events after the shooting. His revealing explanations concerning his decision-making processes while describing what went well and what didn't are educational." "The contents of Chief Belmar's description of events are highly relevant to law enforcement, but also to politicians, city managers, and all those with law enforcement oversight. Chief Belmar incentivizes the need to watch the film through this compelling quote; "It can happen to you..." In the Line of Duty is the only online reality-based video producer of law enforcement training and education. Its Learning Management System is used by thousands of law enforcement professionals for roll call, academy, and in-service training in addition to classroom and distance learning Their modules utilize feature-rich law enforcement education and training using real video, with input from those involved. The Line of Duty online library includes over 300 courses in streaming video and downloadable formats covering virtually every aspect of policing. The company offers instant access to hundreds of programs/courses for immediate purchase/download, allowing law enforcement agencies and cities and municipality management to customize and get the training they need instantly. "We are the gold standard in law enforcement video training, and I am proud that we have not only provided invaluable information and education for over 20 years but also, and most importantly, have saved lies in the process", says LOD President Ron Barber. Additional details regarding In the Line of Duty and Ferguson/The Lessons Learned are available by calling (314) 890-8733 or by emailing info@lineofduty.com. For more information about the company - including access to their entire catalog of video-based training modules and the complete line of products - visit http://www.lineofduty.com. About In The Line of Duty Starting as a producer/provider of VHS training for law enforcement in 1995, In the Line of Duty was founded by veteran broadcast journalists Ron Barber and Don Marsh. The company rapidly evolved from the VHS format to CD-Rom and, currently, DVD, online and digital. Its hundreds of training programs, the largest such video library in the world, currently numbers over 300 and is used by thousands of law enforcement professionals, educators, trainers and students in all 50 states and Canada. David Blake, M.Sc., F.S.A., C.C.I., is a police practices / UoF expert witness and is a contract instructor with the California Training Institute facilitating their CA-POST certified courses entitled; Force Encounters Analysis & Human Factors, Threat and Error Management. He is a former Adjunct Professor of Criminal Justice, and a current Police Academy and Force Options Simulator Instructor. He is a published author in several periodicals and journals to include a quarterly column with PoliceOne online magazine entitled; "The Science of Training". He holds a Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice Management and a Master's of Science in Psychology. He is a Certified Criminal Investigator with the American College of Forensic Examiners Institute and a Force Science Certified Analyst with the Force Science Institute


News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Monroe College, a national leader in educating urban and international students, today announced that it inducted its first class of students into its Police Academy ScholarS (“PASS”) Program. The College developed the innovative two-year program to better prepare minority students for police academy success and support the efforts of the NYPD and other law enforcement organizations to increase their ranks’ diversity. Monroe’s School of Criminal Justice launched the program to assist promising students, especially women and minorities, eager to join the New York Police Department (NYPD) better prepare for career success, starting with the rigors of the police academy. In addition to enhanced instruction and physical training, part of the curriculum focuses on simply helping students understand the prolonged and often complicated hiring process that, according to a New York Times report last year, can take up to four years on average for entry-level positions. Many minority applicants lack support navigating the bureaucracy and drop out of the process in frustration. The PASS Program’s inaugural class of 22 students was inducted on Oct. 6. Sergeant Angel Crespo, a 2007 graduate of Monroe’s Criminal Justice program and now an adjunct professor in the School, gave the keynote address. Sergeant Crespo is also an active member of the NYPD’s 52nd Precinct. More than 70 people were in attendance as the students affirmed their commitment to the program and public service by swearing an oath to abide by the highest standards of integrity and public service. “Monroe’s PASS Program is designed to grant promising future police academy recruits, especially women and minorities, the additional support, training, and instruction that can see them successfully through the police academy and beyond,” said Michele Rodney, dean of Monroe College’s School of Criminal Justice. “The program’s curriculum is designed and taught by former and active members of the NYPD now among our faculty, individuals uniquely well-suited to the task.” PASS Program participants are enrolled within the School of Criminal Justice and have full access to available resources, including the recently installed Law Enforcement Training Simulator (LETS). The state-of-the-art teaching tool enables students to test the appropriate use of force, decision-making skills, and situational response times through realistic, computer-aided simulations of experiences they will likely encounter in the field. Students are placed in cohorts similar to the squads in the NYPD Police Academy, with each one led by a faculty mentor with years of experience in law enforcement. Each cohort will progress through the program as a unit, following the same schedule of classes and workshops to build trust, accountability, and teamwork. Admission to the program is highly competitive. Once enrolled, students must maintain full-time status and a 3.0 GPA in order to remain in good standing. PASS participants meet for 18 three-hour sessions over six semesters to prepare for all facets of a police organization’s hiring process, including written test preparation, as well as medical, physical, and psychological testing. The students will engage in physical training and workouts, academic preparation for actual police academy subjects, and hands-on learning of important police tactics. Off-campus field trips are also part of the program. Students interested in the PASS Program should contact Monroe’s Office of Undergraduate Admissions at 800-556-6676 for more information. Applicants are required to submit a PASS program application, as well as a completed Monroe College application. The admissions review process includes an assessment of academic records, disciplinary record, a background check and high school attendance records. Founded in 1933, New York-based Monroe College is a nationally ranked private institution of higher learning with a real-world learning approach that prioritizes hands-on academic experiences, practical and relevant academic programs, flexible learning schedules, best-in-class instructional technologies, and committed and engaged faculty to ensure that students are well positioned for career success upon graduation. Monroe is among the leading higher education institutions in the country for graduating minority students. Monroe College offers Certificate, Associate, Bachelor’s, and Master’s degree programs. It has campuses in the Bronx, New Rochelle, as well as in the Caribbean nation of St. Lucia, with programs offered through its Schools of Criminal Justice, Information Technology, Nursing, Education, Business & Accounting, Hospitality Management and Culinary Arts, and Allied Health, as well as through its liberal arts and continuing education programs and its King Graduate School. For more information and admissions criteria, please visit http://www.monroecollege.edu


News Article | November 4, 2016
Site: marketersmedia.com

Vincent Iannaco has today been recognized for 20 years service in the NYPD,retired as a Law Instructor in the Police Academy, 23 Years in Financial Services as an Adviser and Branch Manager, Business Consultant Amazon Selling, and Real Estate Investor. This recognition is, in part, a result of Iannaco’s work within public service, Financial Planning/Investing/Amazon Consulting/Real Estate Investing arena, specifically his work helped people enter law enforcement, retire successfully/have Amazon Products reach page one/ help people learn about the most efficient Real Estate Strategies. Iannaco, a native of New York, has been involved with the Financial Planning/Investing/Amazon Consulting/Real Estate Investing world for 20 years, 20 years in the NYPD/23 years in Financial Service/40 years in Business, getting his start when he worked as a young man in his father’s business/ started a Police Career in the elite Tactical Patrol Force/and in Financial Services after retiring from the NYPD. In response to a question on the driving force behind his success, Iannaco has explained that it has been determination/a drive to always do better/an innate desire to help people/ and a desire to be the best at his work. Reflecting on the recognition Iannaco is quoted as saying: “I have always wanted to be the best at what I do.” In a recent one-to-one interview, Iannaco reminisced on other past achievements, which helped build momentum towards the present day. Notably, the proudest was winning several awards as an adviser and then being promoted to Branch Manager in Financial Services. In the same interview, Iannaco stated his intentions for the future. The primary goal for the next 12 months, Iannaco states, will be to invest in real estate properties, a passion he has always had. Looking farther ahead, the ultimate goal is to continue to be a valued consultant and to have several successful businesses. When asked more personally about how he wants to be perceived and remembered, Iannaco said: “I want to be remembered as both a successful and reputable business person who has helped many individuals” Iannaco closed the interview by sharing his recommendation for anybody who wanted to follow in his footsteps in some fashion, perhaps taking the achievements even further. According to Vincent Iannaco, the key is to be determined to succeed in anything one does, in life’s journey, and to always help others. Further information can be found at http://www.vincentiannaco.com For more information, please visit http://www.vincentiannaco.com


News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Kenneth Johnson Jr. has found his dream job working as a police officer at the University of South Alabama. It’s also the place where he earned his degree while playing college football. “It’s home for me,” he says. Kenneth has found his niche, but there were challenges to tackle along the way. In elementary school, Kenneth began having trouble paying attention, and was diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). In high school, his counselor suggested looking into Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) for help planning his career future. VR is a federal-state agency that helps people with disabilities get or keep a job. Kenneth decided to give it a try. He then began meeting with counselor Carol Archie. According to The National Resource on ADHD, approximately 10 million adults are diagnosed with ADHD. This disorder may hinder academic and career success, resulting in unemployment. Carol was not going to let Kenneth become another statistic. “Kenneth showed a lot of independence. He was the one who came in by himself,” Carol says. “It was hard for him to focus sometimes with ADHD, and he needed a lot of encouragement. We were able to provide ongoing vocational guidance and counseling.” Earning a college degree and playing football had always been a dream of Kenneth’s, but when he wasn’t offered a football scholarship on the University of South Alabama team, he wasn’t sure what to do. VR made playing as a walk-on offensive lineman a reality by providing housing and other financial means to keep him afloat. “Thanks to VR, I didn’t have to worry about where to stay,” Kenneth says. “I knew I wanted to go to college, but I didn’t have the resources. They helped me do that and allowed me to focus on academics and not finances.” Kenneth’s college experience didn’t only include playing football. He also dedicated himself to his degree in Criminal Justice. Carol agrees that being a police officer was the perfect path for him. “He is very respectful to everyone,” she says. “You could look up to him, as a person, and an officer.” After Kenneth completed his degree, he was offered an internship at the University of South Alabama Police Academy, which turned into a job offer. He says the favorite part of his career is the interaction he has with students. He even speaks at orientation. “I love talking to freshman who have no idea what they are getting into,” Kenneth says. “I like to give them insight on how to manage their time and how to make themselves successful.” Kenneth doesn’t let his ADHD keep him from focusing on his ambitions, and believes it contributes to his strong work ethic. He believes employers should view it the same way. “People with disabilities are just like any other people, except that we have to work twice as hard to get over that disability,” he says. “Ultimately, that’s what employers should see.” If working full-time as a police officer wasn’t enough, Kenneth is also earning his Master’s degree. Scheduled to graduate in spring of 2017, Kenneth is earning a degree in Time Management and Discipline. “I knew I wanted to further my education and do something that is bigger than me,” Kenneth says. He also knows that Carol is one of the reasons he is able to do so. “She really wanted to help me become successful,” he says. “She is still a part of my life, and I really appreciate all that she has done.” About Vocational Rehabilitation Florida’s Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) is a federal-state program committed to helping people with disabilities become part of America’s workforce. The employer-focused website, https://abilitieswork.employflorida.com/, allows businesses to search at no charge for employees who are ready to go to work, as well as to post available jobs. VR has 90 offices across Florida, and last year helped 5,760 Floridians with significant disabilities find or keep a job. For more information about VR and its services, call (800) 451-4327 or visit http://www.Rehabworks.org.


News Article | December 14, 2015
Site: www.fastcompany.com

I have a confession to make about something that has felt shameful and embarrassing for most of my life. It’s a rare condition that I hide from the world, afraid to reveal it to even my closest friends. As a result, I often feel alone, disconnected from the rest of society, as if I’m living in another galaxy, far far away… What’s my problem? I don’t give a shit about Star Wars. I really don’t care about any of it: The high-speed chase that climaxes in Luke blowing up the Death Star, the revelation that Darth Vader is his father, the aphorisms of Yoda, the flirtation between Han Solo and Princess Leia. Whatever. It just bores me. The endless discussions about the next installment coming out this week, the ranking of all six films, the ubiquitous Darth Vader and stormtrooper costumes that reappear like fungus every Halloween, the Talmudic dissection of scenes and characters and hidden meanings that occurs when any random trio of dads gets together in the park or in a bar or at a Super Soccer Stars practice or anywhere. None of it matters to me. I’ve always felt this way; it's just that I’m more aware of it now, as if a slight cough suddenly developed into a full-blown disease. For years, I could easily avoid Star Wars, tuning out during conversations at school or work, skipping the new episodes, ignoring the endless books, graphic novels, comic books, toys, headline references, images, posters, T-shirts, and other signs of cultural dominance. But now that my son is 7, I can’t escape it — the phenomenon surrounds me every day — and I’ve recognized how unique my condition is. When Star Wars was first released, of course I saw it. Like every other kid in America, I went with some friends to a movie theater in downtown Boston on the day it premiered in May 1977. We were in fourth grade, school was winding down and summer vacation beckoned. We’d all seen the trailer and the full-page ads featuring Luke Skywalker wielding that strange new weapon called a light saber. Even in that analog era, the hype machine was in full effect. And at that age, old enough to appreciate plot twists but still full of childish wonder, we were ready to fall under the spell of a fairy tale that promised to be so much more exciting than anything we’d read in comic books or seen in Saturday morning cartoons. As our parents dropped us off and we walked into the dark theater that day, we clutched huge bags of popcorn and savored the joy of anticipation. But unlike every other kid in America, I wasn’t spellbound. I didn’t swoon. I didn’t go back to see it again the next day or the day after that or ever again. I didn’t buy a single Star Wars doll or toy or comic book. I may have seen Empire Strikes Back when it came out two years later, but I’m not even sure. Neither do I remember seeing Return of the Jedi. I know that at some point, I watched both of those movies — one of them includes the "Luke, I am your father" scene and the other one has Jabba the Hutt, right? But it might have been on TV or on video, for all I know. That’s how much of an impression they made on me. I don’t know how to explain my indifference. It’s not that I’m a cultural snob — I loved stupid comedies like the Bad News Bears and Police Academy, as well as blockbuster action adventures like Jaws and Indiana Jones. It’s not that I hate science fiction — I’m a lackluster fan but I’ve been genuinely moved by some of Ray Bradbury and Isaac Asimov’s finest stories. Star Wars just never did it for me. I can only speculate on the reasons why — that maybe the fight scenes didn’t seem that exciting or the chases were hard to visualize or the acting was so wooden or the whole damn thing seemed kind of hokey. But I really don’t know. Later, I could convince myself that the movies didn’t leave any room for a child’s imagination, that it was too obvious in its desire to satisfy every craving of its audience. But that wasn’t it for me, either. Looking back at some of the few negative reviews at the time, I can understand what Pauline Kael meant when she snarked that "it’s an epic without a dream" and a film "that’s totally uninterested in anything that doesn’t connect with the mass audience." But my disinterest was never that intellectual. It was more visceral — it just didn’t excite me or enervate me or intrigue me in any way. And so I walked out of the theater that warm evening feeling kind of meh, probably mimicking some of my friends’ enthusiasm so I wouldn’t feel left out. And over the years, I’d join my friends when they talked about key scenes and I’d joke with coworkers about going to our office at the "Death Star." But it was all a little forced — the truth is I didn’t give a shit. Like an atheist trying to get by in Puritan New England in the 17th century, you’ve got to talk the Gospel and walk the Gospel or you might get burned at the stake. Or even worse, teased by your friends at school. And then decades later, I'd be puzzled over by adult buddies, who’d gaze at me in curiosity, trying to figure out whether I was being sarcastic or just plain strange. Most of the time, they wouldn’t even indulge me or ask me to explain my indifference. They’d just awkwardly turn away and find someone normal to talk to. Because it is strange not to like Star Wars — it’s one of those rare cultural phenomena that unites everyone — jocks and geeks, hipsters and frat boys, white-collar executives and blue-collar factory workers, women and men, gays and straights, blacks and whites, native-born and immigrant. Even my chai-sipping yoga teacher wife. Except for my son. To my astonishment and relief, he is equally nonplussed about Star Wars. He has no interest in seeing the movies, has none of the toys, none of the books or comic books, and he gets bored when his friends talk about it. The one gift that remains unopened two months after his birthday is a massive Star Wars Lego set. Don’t blame me. I swear that I’ve never sought to influence him or tell him about my lack of interest. In fact, I’ve asked him a few times whether he wants to watch the first one and he always sighs in response and shakes his head. It must be in the genes. So on December 18, when lines form around the block at every theater in the country to see The Force Awakens, my son and I won’t be there. The force is not strong with us. A version of this essay appeared on Marcus Baram's Medium account.


News Article | December 21, 2016
Site: www.prlog.org

Contribution in Memory of Blake Snyder and Other Police Officers Killed in the Line of Duty -- Roeslein & Associates, Inc. recently presented The BackStoppers organization with a check for $50,000 in memory of Officer Blake Snyder and other police officers who have fallen in the line of duty. Ron Battelle, Executive Director of The BackStoppers and former St. Louis County Police Chief, received the contribution during a presentation at Roeslein & Associates headquarters December 14, 2016.The BackStoppers is an organization that provides needed financial assistance and support to the spouses and dependent children of all police officers, firefighters, volunteer firefighters, and publicly-funded paramedics and EMTs in our coverage area who have lost their lives or suffered a catastrophic injury performing their duty."It is an honor and privilege to help these families. It is also an honor and privilege to accept this contribution from Rudi and the company. We will be eternally grateful for what you have done here," Battelle said. "We deeply, deeply appreciate this donation."Owner of Roeslein & Associates, Rudi Roeslein, addressed the company during this donation ceremony stating, "For those whom do not know, Jeremy Quate of our Red Bud facility attended training at the Police Academy with Office Blake Snyder. Shortly after Officer Snyder's passing, Jeremy reached out to me asking if I was aware of The BackStoppers program. I already knew I wanted to help in whatever way possible and this confirmed that Roeslein & Associates would be taking action." Mr. Roeslein continued on by saying, "As a company in the Lindbergh school district and a significant contributor to this community I think it is our duty to show support for our police. I thank them for their continued service and hope that this contribution will help to make a difference."The BackStoppers Organization will use this donation to assist Elizabeth Snyder, wife of fallen Officer Blake Snyder, on putting a down payment on a new home for her and her family.  The BackStoppers organization continues to support the surviving spouse and all dependent children until they reach age 21 or complete their post-secondary education. The BackStoppers currently supports 81 families with 66 dependent children and has supported 160 families since 1959 in its inception.Roeslein & Associates was founded in 1990, specializing in engineering, modular fabrication and construction services. The company has product offerings in both the container manufacturing industry and the process and energy sectors with annual revenues over $200 million. Its 400+ employees are spread throughout offices in St. Louis, MO (HQ), Red Bud, IL, Denver, CO, Birmingham, UK and Shanghai, China. To find out more, please visit www.roeslein.com


Ping T.,Police Academy
Proceedings - 2015 7th International Conference on Measuring Technology and Mechatronics Automation, ICMTMA 2015 | Year: 2015

This paper introduces the basis deep packet inspection technology, studies data filtering technology, stream filter technology and intrusion prevention system. Then it further puts forward a string matching-based deep packet inspection model, explains framework structure of model and its various parts design in detail and analyzes key parts affecting packet detection performance. We study relevant string matching algorithm. After it analyzes classical BM algorithm and standard BF algorithm, this paper proposes an improved BF string matching algorithm. Finally, based on open source IDS system Snort, this paper performs comparison analysis on BM, BF and its improved algorithm on matching speed and memory occupation. The results prove that the improved project is superior to traditional BM algorithm on matching speed or memory occupation based on certain scale of rule set. © 2015 IEEE.


News Article | December 23, 2016
Site: www.prnewswire.com

HARRISBURG, Pa., Dec. 23, 2016 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Commissioner Tyree C. Blocker announced today that 62 cadets graduated from the State Police Academy in Hershey, PA and have been assigned to troops across the commonwealth. The men and women represent the 147th graduating cadet...

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