Poison Center

Charleston, WV, United States

Poison Center

Charleston, WV, United States
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News Article | May 17, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

Watch news, TV and more Yahoo View, available on iOS and Android. A coffee, a caffeinated drink and an energy soda proved a deadly combination for a South Carolina teenager who died within two hours of consuming them, triggering warnings about the risks of caffeine overdose. Davis Allen Cripe died on April 26 from a "caffeine-induced cardiac event causing a probable arrhythmia," the Richland County coroner's office in the southern US state wrote in a statement. Two hours before he collapsed, Cripe drank a cafe latte, a large Diet Mountain Dew and an energy drink. Richland County Coroner Gary Watts noted Tueday that such occurrences are "highly unusual." "It was mainly due to the time period that he ingested a rapid amount of caffeine that affected his heart," Watts told The Post and Courier, adding that Cripe had collapsed just 15 minutes after taking the energy drink. The US Food and Drug Administration recommends that adults consume no more than 400 mg of caffeine per day, which is equivalent to four or five cups of coffee. "While adults should be mindful of their caffeine consumption, it's important for parents to know the risks of children and adolescents consuming caffeine," Jill Michels of the Palmetto Poison Center said in a statement. "Take the time to talk with your children about the dangers of caffeinated drinks." At a news conference on Monday, the boy's father said his son was very careful about drugs and alcohol. "It wasn't a car crash that took his life. Instead, it was an energy drink," Sean Cripe said. While energy drinks account for just a small segment of the non-alcoholic beverages industry, they are very popular with young people. Health experts have expressed concern about the drinks' high caffeine content, which can cause arrhythmia and raise blood pressure in young people. Energy drinks can contain up to 240 milligrams of caffeine, according to a 2012 Consumer Reports study.


MCKay C.,University of Connecticut | Scharman E.J.,Poison Center
Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America | Year: 2015

Numerous examples of chemical contamination of food, water, or medication have led to steps by regulatory agencies to maintain the safety of this critical social infrastructure and supply chain. Identification of contaminant site is important. Environmental testing and biomonitoring can define the nature and extent of the event and are useful for providing objective information, but may be unavailable in time for clinical care. Clinical diagnosis should be based on toxidrome recognition and assessment of public health implications. There are several resources available to assist and these can be accessed through regional poison control centers or local/state public health departments. © 2015 Elsevier Inc.


Bouchez C.,British Petroleum | Gervais F.,British Petroleum | Fleurance R.,British Petroleum | Palate B.,British Petroleum | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Toxicologic Pathology | Year: 2012

Although a T-dependent antibody response (TDAR) assay is generally recommended as the first-line immune function assay in nonclinical immunotoxicity evaluation, second-line assays such as delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) to measure cell-mediated responses can provide helpful additional information. In this study, male Cynomolgus monkeys were injected intramuscularly either once or twice with 1 mg Keyhole Limpet Hemocyanin (KLH) or twice with a commercially available tetanus vaccine (40 IU tetanus toxoid + 0.06 mg aluminum hydroxide). All animals were subsequently challenged by intradermal injections of the same antigen or aluminum hydroxide after 4, 6 and 8 weeks. Clinical reactions at the injection sites were scored 24, 48 and 72 h post challenge. Skin biopsies were taken on completion of the observation period after each challenge for standard histological examination and immunolabeling using CD3 (T lymphocytes), CD19 (B lymphocytes) and CD68 (macrophages) antibodies. Tetanus toxoid induced stronger clinical reactions than KLH, whereas aluminum hydroxide induced no clinical reaction. Perivascular mononuclear cell infiltrates, a histopathological finding consistent with a DTH reaction, were seen after all challenges with tetanus toxoid or KLH, but not with aluminum hydroxide. Immunohistochemistry evidenced the presence of T lymphocytes and macrophages within these infiltrates. These results suggest that tetanus toxoid adjuvanted with aluminum hydroxide can induce a consistent DTH response for use as a model of cell-mediated response in Cynomolgus monkeys. © 2012 The Japanese Society of Toxicologic Pathology.


Flesch F.,Poison Center | Rigaux-Barry F.,Poison Center | Saviuc P.,Toxicovigilance Center | Garnier R.,Poison Center | And 4 more authors.
Clinical Toxicology | Year: 2011

Introduction. In March 2008, French poison centres (PCs) recorded the first calls reporting persistent bitterness following the ingestion of pine nuts. Methods. The French toxic exposure surveillance system (French-Tess) was searched and a descriptive analysis of cases was performed on data recorded from 13 March 2008 to 31 January 2010. Results. Some 3111 cases of bitterness were reported to PCs. The number of cases rose sharply from May 2009 to reach a peak in August 2009 with 697 cases. The median time to onset of dysgeusia was 24 hours and it lasted less than 14 days in 95% of cases. Raw as well as cooked or processed pine nuts were implicated. Discussion. The delayed onset and persistence of dysgeusia suggest that the toxin may act via an unknown toxic mechanism on the receptor. The aetiological agent could be an unidentified toxin present in some varieties of non-edible pine nuts. Conclusion. The high incidence of the event and the lack of understanding of the nature of the toxin and its pathophysiological mechanism require continued monitoring of poison cases, botanical and biochemical analysis, and experimental studies. © 2011 Informa Healthcare USA, Inc.


PubMed | Poison Center
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Clinical toxicology (Philadelphia, Pa.) | Year: 2011

In March 2008, French poison centres (PCs) recorded the first calls reporting persistent bitterness following the ingestion of pine nuts.The French toxic exposure surveillance system (French-Tess) was searched and a descriptive analysis of cases was performed on data recorded from 13 March 2008 to 31 January 2010.Some 3111 cases of bitterness were reported to PCs. The number of cases rose sharply from May 2009 to reach a peak in August 2009 with 697 cases. The median time to onset of dysgeusia was 24 hours and it lasted less than 14 days in 95% of cases. Raw as well as cooked or processed pine nuts were implicated.The delayed onset and persistence of dysgeusia suggest that the toxin may act via an unknown toxic mechanism on the receptor. The aetiological agent could be an unidentified toxin present in some varieties of non-edible pine nuts.The high incidence of the event and the lack of understanding of the nature of the toxin and its pathophysiological mechanism require continued monitoring of poison cases, botanical and biochemical analysis, and experimental studies.


PubMed | Poison Center and University of Connecticut
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Emergency medicine clinics of North America | Year: 2014

Numerous examples of chemical contamination of food, water, or medication have led to steps by regulatory agencies to maintain the safety of this critical social infrastructure and supply chain. Identification of contaminant site is important. Environmental testing and biomonitoring can define the nature and extent of the event and are useful for providing objective information, but may be unavailable in time for clinical care. Clinical diagnosis should be based on toxidrome recognition and assessment of public health implications. There are several resources available to assist and these can be accessed through regional poison control centers or local/state public health departments.


News Article | February 22, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

NDA Partners Chairman Carl Peck, MD, announced today that Dr. Daniel Spyker, PhD, MD former Acting Deputy Director in the FDA CDRH Division of Cardiovascular, Respiratory, and Neurological Devices and Medical Officer in CDER’s Pilot Drug Evaluation Staff has joined the company as an Expert Consultant. In Dr. Spyker’s accomplished career, he held positions as Senior Director of Drug Safety and Pharmacovigilance at Alexza Pharmaceuticals; Director, Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamic Sciences, Genentech, where he established the clinical pharmacology unit; and Senior Medical Director, Clinical Risk Assessment and Coordination Department at Purdue Pharma. Dr. Spyker was a member of the Internal Medicine faculty in the Division of Clinical Pharmacology at the University of Virginia for 10 years, where he fostered and nurtured the Blue Ridge Poison Center. He was also founder and CEO of a software company specializing in poison center data collection and Bayesian pharmacokinetic applications. “Dr. Daniel Spkyer’s knowledge and expertise of cardiovascular, respiratory, and neurological devices at FDA and in the Industry, in addition to his expertise in quantitative clinical pharmacology and toxicology, make him an excellent addition to NDA Partners. He will bring great value to our medical device clients and we are very pleased to welcome him,” said Dr. Feigal, who heads NDA Partners’ Medical Device Practice. Dr. Spyker earned his PhD from the University of Minnesota in Electrical Engineering and Mathematics, his MD from the University of Virginia, and MS from Purdue University. He is board certified in Internal Medicine, a diplomate of the American Board of Medical Toxicology, and diplomate of the American Board of Clinical Pharmacology. About NDA Partners NDA Partners is a strategy consulting firm specializing in expert product development and regulatory advice to the medical products industry and associated service industries such as law firms, investment funds and government research agencies. The highly experienced Principals and Premier Experts of NDA Partners include three former FDA Center Directors; the former Chairman of the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) in the UK; an international team of more than 100 former pharmaceutical industry and regulatory agency senior executives; and an extensive roster of highly proficient experts in specialized areas including nonclinical development, toxicology, pharmacokinetics, CMC, medical device design control and quality systems, clinical development, regulatory submissions, and development program management. Services include product development and regulatory strategy, expert consulting, high-impact project teams, and virtual product development teams.

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