PO Box 301402

Houston, TX, United States

PO Box 301402

Houston, TX, United States

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Zhou Y.,PO Box 301402 | Bollu L.R.,University of Houston | Tozzi F.,PO Box 301402 | Ye X.,PO Box 301402 | And 10 more authors.
Molecular Cancer Therapeutics | Year: 2013

Combination chemotherapy is standard for metastatic colorectal cancer; however, nearly all patients develop drug resistance. Understanding the mechanisms that lead to resistance to individual chemotherapeutic agents may enable identification of novel targets and more effective therapy. Irinotecan is commonly used in first- and second-line therapy for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer, with the active metabolite being SN38. Emerging evidence suggests that altered metabolism in cancer cells is fundamentally involved in the development of drug resistance. Using Oncomine and unbiased proteomic profiling, we found that ATP citrate lyase (ACLy), the first-step rate-limiting enzyme for de novo lipogenesis, was upregulated in colorectal cancer compared with its levels in normal mucosa and in chemoresistant colorectal cancer cells compared with isogenic chemo-naïve colorectal cancer cells. Overexpression of exogenous ACLy by lentivirus transduction in chemo-naïve colorectal cancer cells led to significant chemoresistance to SN38 but not to 5-fluorouracil or oxaliplatin. Knockdown of ACLy by siRNA or inhibition of its activity by a small-molecule inhibitor sensitized chemo-naïve colorectal cancer cells to SN38. Furthermore, ACLy was significantly increased in cancer cells that had acquired resistance to SN38. In contrast to chemo-naïve cells, targeting ACLy alone was not effective in resensitizing resistant cells to SN38, due to a compensatory activation of the AKT pathway triggered by ACLy suppression. Combined inhibition ofAKTsignaling andACLy successfully resensitized SN38-resistant cells to SN38. We conclude that targeting ACLy may improve the therapeutic effects of irinotecan and that simultaneous targeting of ACLy and AKT may be warranted to overcome SN38 resistance. © 2013 AACR.


PubMed | PO Box 301402
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Nature reviews. Endocrinology | Year: 2011

Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) and the multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) type 2 syndromes are rare but important endocrine diseases that are increasingly managed by pediatric providers. MTC is generally associated with a favorable prognosis when diagnosed during childhood, where it frequently occurs secondary to activating mutations in the RET proto-oncogene and arises from pre-existing C-cell hyperplasia. MEN2A accounts for 90-95% of childhood MTC cases and is most commonly due to mutations in codon 634 of RET. MEN2B is associated with the most aggressive clinical presentation of MTC and is almost always due to the Met918Thr mutation of RET. Surgery is the primary treatment and only chance of cure, although the advent of targeted therapies seems to be improving progression-free survival in advanced cases. Since the discovery of the role of RET in MEN2A, considerable advances in the management of this syndrome have occurred, and most of the children with MEN2A who have undergone early thyroidectomy will now lead full, productive lives. Strong genotype-phenotype correlations have facilitated the development of guidelines for interventions. Contemporary approaches for deciding the appropriate age at which surgery should take place incorporate data from ultrasonography and calcitonin measurements in addition to the results of genotyping. To optimize care and to facilitate ongoing research, children with MTC and the MEN2 syndromes are optimally treated at tertiary centers with multidisciplinary expertise.

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