United States
United States

Time filter

Source Type

News Article | February 28, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

TORONTO, Feb. 28, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Golden Share (TSX-V:GSH) is pleased to announce the successful trial production of the Licensed Vanadium Electrolyte (VE) which was developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (“PNNL”) of the United States Department of Energy. This VE product has advantages over previous generations, including a wider temperature-operating range and higher energy density. (Please refer to the Press Release dated October 18, 2016 for details.) The trial production of this VE product represents a milestone in the development of Golden Share’s strategic partnership with Northwest Mining & Exploration Group Co., Ltd. for Nonferrous Metals (“NWME”). NWME owns and operates the largest primary vanadium mine in China since initial production in 2011. (Please refer to the Press Release dated May 24, 2016 for details.) “While announcing that the Licensed Vanadium Electrolyte is ready for commercial applications, we are excited for this recent development which is a major step closer to Golden Share’s goal to become a preferred supplier of vanadium electrolyte. We are very proud of the scientists, technicians and all associates at NWME and appreciate their hard and efficient work.” Nick Zeng, the President and CEO stated, “We would like to work with all Vanadium Redox Flow Battery (VRFB) manufacturers together to make VRFB to be the preferred solution for utility scale energy storage.” A reliable and cost effective long hours energy storage solution is poised to play a pivotal role in the future developments of renewable energy industry. Golden Share believes VRFB is a better solution among the available energy storage technologies on the market. Golden Share will now proceed to select VRFB manufacturers as future partners to test the Licensed VE as part of pilot projects potentially developed by Golden Share. Interdisciplinary teams at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) address many of America's most pressing issues in energy, the environment and national security through advances in basic and applied science.  PNNL employs 4,400 staff, has an annual budget of nearly $1 billion, and has been managed for the U.S. Department of Energy by Ohio-based Battelle since the laboratory's inception in 1965. Northwest Mining & Exploration Group Co., Ltd. For Nonferrous Metals (NWME) is a large Chinese State-owned Enterprise. NWME has invested more than 20 mines involving gold, silver, copper, lead, zinc, vanadium, molybdenum and etc. through exploration and development in China and overseas. The Qianjiaping Vanadium Mine (Qianjiaping) of NWME is located in Shaanxi Province, China. Qianjiaping was put into production in 2011, is an environmental friendly vanadium mine with complete production, management and safety systems. Golden Share Mining Corporation is a Canadian junior mining company focusing on exploration in Ontario, the politically stable jurisdiction with a history of rich mineral endowment. Neither TSX Venture Exchange nor its Regulation Services Provider (as that term is defined in the policies of the TSX Venture Exchange) accepts responsibility for the adequacy or accuracy of this release.


« 7-state Midwest EVOLVE project to promote electric vehicles; Ford, GM, Nissan initial automotive partners | Main | WiTricity collaborating with Nissan on wireless charging for EVs » Southern California Gas Co. (SoCalGas) announced a pilot hydrothermal wastewater processing project has been selected by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to receive up to $1.2 million in federal funding. SoCalGas is part of a consortium conducting the pilot, which will be required to share the cost at a minimum of 50% in order to receive federal funds. The consortium is being led by the Water Environment & Reuse Foundation (WERF). The project will use Genifuel hydrothermal processing technology (HTP) to convert wastewater solids into renewable natural gas as well as liquid fuels. DOE funding is expected to pay for about half of the design and planning of a pilot plant to produce these renewable fuels at a municipal wastewater treatment facility near Oakland, California. SoCalGas will help oversee the project’s design and assist in obtaining state and federal regulatory approvals and incentives. The technology, developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) over a 40-year period, converts waste solids from a wastewater treatment plant into biocrude and methane gas using water, heat and pressure. HTP uses subcritical water and pressure (350 °C and 207 bar) to convert the wet organics into crude oil and natural gas. The process mimics the way fossil fuels were formed—but takes 45 minutes rather than millions of years. HTP is highly efficient, capturing more than 85% of feedstock energy and using only 15% for process. At the process conditions, water changes from a polar molecule to a non-polar molecule and becomes an extremely powerful solvent for organics. Lipids, proteins, and carbs are converted to oil. The oil and water become completely soluble until cool; sulfur and phosphorus become highly insoluble, precipitate rapidly, and are recovered as dense “ore” from the oil stage. All nitrogen is reduced to ammonia in the gas stage, recoverable by membrane or other method. The biocrude oil, with nearly zero net new carbon emissions, will be refined in an existing refinery, while the methane gas will be sold for transport in the gas pipeline system or used at the pilot plant to offset power needs elsewhere in the plant. If fully implemented in wastewater treatment operations across the US, the technology will produce more than two billion gallons of gasoline equivalent per year. The system also produces fertilizer byproducts. The Central Contra Costa Sanitary District, near Oakland, California, will host the pilot system. The consortium includes the Water Environment & Reuse Foundation, which represents many of the 16,000 wastewater systems in the US. The consortium also includes Genifuel Corp. with technology from DOE’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Merrick & Co., Tesoro Corp., Metro Vancouver, MicroBio Engineering, Brown and Caldwell, and more than a dozen utility partners. This new technology could have an enormous impact on energy and waste. Converting the wastewater solids produced by treatment plants in the U.S. with hydrothermal processing could produce about 128 billion cubic feet of natural gas per year and save treatment utilities $2.2 billion in solids disposal costs. A city of one million people could produce more than 600 million cubic feet of natural gas per year, save more than $7 million per year in disposal costs, and power nearly 7,000 vehicles per day.


News Article | February 23, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

PULLMAN, Wash. - A Washington State University study of the chemistry of technetium-99 has improved understanding of the challenging nuclear waste and could lead to better cleanup methods. The work is reported in the journal Inorganic Chemistry. It was led by John McCloy, associate professor in the School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, and chemistry graduate student Jamie Weaver. Researchers from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), the Office of River Protection and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory collaborated. Technetium-99 is a byproduct of plutonium weapons production and is considered a major U.S. challenge for environmental cleanup. At the Hanford Site nuclear complex in Washington state, there are about 2,000 pounds of the element dispersed within approximately 56 million gallons of nuclear waste in 177 storage tanks. The U.S. Department of Energy is in the process of building a waste treatment plant at Hanford to immobilize hazardous nuclear waste in glass. But researchers have been stymied because not all the technetium-99 is incorporated into the glass and volatilized gas must be recycled back into the melter system. The element can be very soluble in water and moves easily through the environment when in certain forms, so it is considered a significant environmental hazard. Because technetium compounds are challenging to work with, earlier research has used less volatile substitutes to try to understand the material's behavior. Some of the compounds themselves have not been studied for 50 years, said McCloy. "The logistics are very challenging," he said. The WSU work was done in PNNL's highly specialized Radiochemical Processing Laboratory and the radiological annex of its Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory. The researchers conducted fundamental chemistry tests to better understand technetium-99 and its unique challenges for storage. They determined that the sodium forms of the element behave much differently than other alkalis, which possibly is related to its volatility and to why it may be so reactive with water. "The structure and spectral signatures of these compounds will aid in refining the understanding of technetium incorporation into nuclear waste glasses," said McCloy. The researchers also hope the work will contribute to the study of other poorly understood chemical compounds.


News Article | February 24, 2017
Site: www.rdmag.com

A Washington State University study of the chemistry of technetium-99 has improved understanding of the challenging nuclear waste and could lead to better cleanup methods. The work is reported in the journal Inorganic Chemistry. It was led by John McCloy, associate professor in the School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, and chemistry graduate student Jamie Weaver. Researchers from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), the Office of River Protection and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory collaborated. Technetium-99 is a byproduct of plutonium weapons production and is considered a major U.S. challenge for environmental cleanup. At the Hanford Site nuclear complex in Washington state, there are about 2,000 pounds of the element dispersed within approximately 56 million gallons of nuclear waste in 177 storage tanks. The U.S. Department of Energy is in the process of building a waste treatment plant at Hanford to immobilize hazardous nuclear waste in glass. But researchers have been stymied because not all the technetium-99 is incorporated into the glass and volatilized gas must be recycled back into the melter system. The element can be very soluble in water and moves easily through the environment when in certain forms, so it is considered a significant environmental hazard. Because technetium compounds are challenging to work with, earlier research has used less volatile substitutes to try to understand the material's behavior. Some of the compounds themselves have not been studied for 50 years, said McCloy. "The logistics are very challenging," he said. The WSU work was done in PNNL's highly specialized Radiochemical Processing Laboratory and the radiological annex of its Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory. The researchers conducted fundamental chemistry tests to better understand technetium-99 and its unique challenges for storage. They determined that the sodium forms of the element behave much differently than other alkalis, which possibly is related to its volatility and to why it may be so reactive with water. "The structure and spectral signatures of these compounds will aid in refining the understanding of technetium incorporation into nuclear waste glasses," said McCloy. The researchers also hope the work will contribute to the study of other poorly understood chemical compounds.


News Article | February 28, 2017
Site: marketersmedia.com

The trial production of this VE product represents a milestone in the development of Golden Share's strategic partnership with Northwest Mining & Exploration Group Co., Ltd. for Nonferrous Metals ("NWME"). NWME owns and operates the largest primary vanadium mine in China since initial production in 2011. (Please refer the Press Release dated May 24, 2016 for details.) "While announcing that the Licensed Vanadium Electrolyte is ready for commercial applications, we are excited for this recent development which is a major step closer to Golden Share's goal to become a preferred supplier of vanadium electrolyte. We are very proud of the scientists, technicians and all associates at NWME and appreciate their hard and efficient work." Nick Zeng, the President and CEO stated, "We would like to work with all Vanadium Redox Flow Battery (VRFB) manufacturers together to make VRFB to be the preferred solution for utility scale energy storage." A reliable and cost effective long hours energy storage solution is poised to play a pivotal role in the future developments of renewable energy industry. Golden Share believes VRFB is a better solution among the available energy storage technologies on the market. Golden Share will now proceed to select VRFB manufacturers as future partners to test the Licensed VE as part of pilot projects potentially developed by Golden Share. Interdisciplinary teams at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) address many of America's most pressing issues in energy, the environment and national security through advances in basic and applied science. PNNL employs 4,400 staff, has an annual budget of nearly $1 billion, and has been managed for the U.S. Department of Energy by Ohio-based Battelle since the laboratory's inception in 1965. Northwest Mining & Exploration Group Co., Ltd. For Nonferrous Metals (NWME) is a large Chinese State-owned Enterprise. NWME has invested more than 20 mines involving gold, silver, copper, lead, zinc, vanadium, molybdenum and etc. through exploration and development in China and overseas. The Qianjiaping Vanadium Mine (Qianjiaping) of NWME is located in Shaanxi Province, China. Qianjiaping was put into production in 2011, is an environmental friendly vanadium mine with complete production, management and safety systems. Golden Share Mining Corporation is a Canadian junior mining company focusing on exploration in Ontario, the politically stable jurisdiction with a history of rich mineral endowment. Neither TSX Venture Exchange nor its Regulation Services Provider (as that term is defined in the policies of the TSX Venture Exchange) accepts responsibility for the adequacy or accuracy of this release. FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONSULT www.goldenshare.ca OR CONTACT:


TechNexus, a venture collaborative that finds, funds and builds technology ventures in conjunction with leading corporations and the entrepreneurial ecosystem, concludes the second year of the EMERGE Accelerator Program on March 1. In partnership with U.S. Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate (S&T), the Center for Innovative Technology (CIT), and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), EMERGE provides ventures with access to commercial industry partners, investors and first responder feedback, enabling early market validation while advancing technology specifically designed to decrease risk for firefighters, police and emergency medical workers. “Most of the nation’s 70,000 public safety agencies operate locally and independent of each other making innovation – and new tech adoption – nearly impossible,” said Terry Howerton, co-founder and CEO of TechNexus. “As we’ve seen with our corporate partners’ venture collaboration programs, when established organizations connect with early-stage ventures, it ultimately disrupts outdated approaches to innovation. Specifically with EMERGE, it enabled corporate introductions, pilots and path-to-market opportunities for ventures that solve first responders’ most critical challenges.” “We see programs like EMERGE as invaluable to both the first responders that keep communities safe as well as the entrepreneurs who have life-saving innovation to bring to the table,” said David Ihrie, Chief Technology Officer for CIT. The program culminates with the EMERGE2016: Wearable Technology Showcase on Wednesday, March 1, which will showcase progress, market traction and impact made during the program. The showcase will have live demos and several tech talks on innovation and first responders. Attendees will include a broad group of stakeholders across government, first responder agencies, the investment community, commercial markets and each of the following ventures: Additional information can be found here. The EMERGE 2016: Wearable Technology Showcase will be held from 9:30 a.m. - 2:00 p.m. ET at Sixth Engine, 438 Massachusetts Avenue NW, Washington, D.C. 20001. About TechNexus: TechNexus Venture Collaborative finds, funds and builds technology ventures in conjunction with leading corporations and the entrepreneurial ecosystem. Blending elements of venture incubation, capital, and corporate innovation, TechNexus catalyzes meaningful collaboration between corporate partners and ventures. It operates a global network through which it sources, filters and engages venture activity. More than 400 ventures have grown with TechNexus to date. For more information, visit technexus.com, follow @TechNexus on Twitter or find us on LinkedIn. About EMERGE: EMERGE 2016: Wearable Technology is designed to reach early-stage companies with a commercial wearable technology that is adaptable for first responders. It is a partnership with S&T, CIT, PNNL. For more information visit: http://emerge-technexus.com or http://www.dhs.gov/science-and-technology/accelerator. About U.S. Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Science and Technology Directorate (S&T) conducts serves as the scientific and analytical core of Department. S&T supports the Homeland Security Enterprise in several core areas, including borders and maritime security, cybersecurity, chemical and biological defense, countering explosives, and first responder support. To learn more, please visit http://www.dhs.gov/science-and-technology. Like and follow us on Facebook and Twitter @dhsscitech, #TechEMERGE. About the Center for Innovative Technology Since 1985, CIT, a nonprofit corporation, has been Virginia’s primary driver of innovation and entrepreneurship. CIT accelerates the next generation of technology and technology companies through commercialization, capital formation, market development and revenue generation services. To facilitate national innovation leadership and accelerate the rate of technology adoption, CIT creates partnerships between innovative technology start-up companies and advanced technology consumers. CIT’s CAGE Code is 1UP71. To learn more, please visit http://www.cit.org. Follow CIT on Twitter @CITorg and add the Center for Innovative Technology on LinkedIn and Facebook.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

RICHLAND, Wash. - Two researchers at the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have been elected to membership in the prestigious National Academy of Engineering. Ruby Leung and Johannes Lercher are among the 106 new members elected worldwide to the 2017 class. The NAE is a private, independent, nonprofit institution that is part of The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. NAE focuses on maintaining a strong engineering community and bringing together experts to provide independent advice to the federal government on engineering and technology challenges. Lercher and Leung join emeritus staff member Subhash Singhal, who is a National Academy of Sciences member, as PNNL researchers in the National Academies. "I am thrilled that the exceptional contributions of two of our researchers have been recognized by the National Academy of Engineering," said PNNL director Steven Ashby. "Membership in the NAE is among the highest honors that a researcher can achieve, and Ruby and Johannes are most deserving. Congratulations to both of them!" Ruby Leung is an atmospheric scientist at PNNL and also an affiliate scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research. She was elected based on her leadership in regional and global computer modeling of the Earth's climate and water cycles. Leung's research has advanced understanding and modeling of the regional and global water cycles, with implications for managing water, agriculture and energy. She has organized key workshops sponsored by environmental agencies, served on panels that define future priorities in climate modeling, and has developed computer climate models that are used globally. She has published more than 200 peer-reviewed journal articles and is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Geophysical Union and the American Meteorological Society. She earned a bachelor's degree in physics and statistics from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, and a master's degree and a doctorate in atmospheric science from Texas A&M University. Johannes Lercher is a chemist and holds a joint appointment at PNNL and the Technische Universität München in Germany. At PNNL, he serves as the director of the Institute for Integrated Catalysis, and at TUM he is a professor in the Department of Chemistry and holds the chair of the Institute for Technische Chemie. He was elected based on his catalysis research, which focuses on the details of how catalysts work at the elementary level and using that insight to design and build better catalysts for industrial applications, including cleaner fossil fuels and renewable, biology-based fuels. He has published more than 500 peer-reviewed journal articles, is editor-in-chief of the Journal of Catalysis and was previously elected to the Austrian Academy of Sciences, the Academia Europaea and the European Academy of Sciences. He has won numerous awards, including the David Trim and Noel Cant Lectureship given by the Catalysis Society of Australia, the Eni Award for energy research, and the Francois Gault lectureship of the European Association of Catalysis Societies. He earned undergraduate and graduate degrees, as well as a doctorate in chemistry from the Technische Universität Wien, Austria. The newly elected class brings the NAE's total U.S. membership to 2,281 and the number of foreign members to 249. Lercher and Leung will be inducted at a ceremony in Washington, DC in October. Interdisciplinary teams at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory address many of America's most pressing issues in energy, the environment and national security through advances in basic and applied science. Founded in 1965, PNNL employs 4,400 staff and has an annual budget of nearly $1 billion. It is managed by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science. As the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States, the Office of Science is working to address some of the most pressing challenges of our time. For more information on PNNL, visit the PNNL News Center, or follow PNNL on Facebook, Google+, Instagram, LinkedIn and Twitter.


News Article | February 25, 2017
Site: www.techtimes.com

Washington State University conducted tests to study the effects of the chemical substance known as technetium-99. The study was led by John McCloy, an associate professor in the School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering along with Jamie Weaver, a chemistry graduate student. They worked in collaboration with researchers from the Office of River Protection and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Technetium-99 is the chemical by-product derived as a result of plutonium weapon production. It is being considered a major problem as scientists are trying to find new methods of disposing the nuclear waste. In fact, there exists about 2000 pounds of technetium-99 which is stored in 177 storage tanks at the Hanford nuclear site in Washington. The element is readily soluble in water and so poses an intense risk. Due to its volatility, it can easily contaminate water streams which would cause major health issues. Nuclear wastes are generated from nuclear power plants in significant amounts and thus, it needs to be managed and disposed of properly. The most important issue concerning the nuclear waste is the management of its toxic nature, so that it poses no risk to the workers or the general public. The Washington State University conducted the study of technetium-99 in PNNL's highly specialized Radiochemical Processing Laboratory. Researchers carried out various tests with the compound. Their aim was to precisely observe technetium-99 and determine how it may be stored. They found that the sodium reacts differently in the compound than in any other alkalis, which may go a long way in defining why technetium-99 is so reactive with water. This may also reveal the reason behind its volatility. "The structure and spectral signatures of these compounds will aid in refining the understanding of technetium incorporation into nuclear waste glasses," said McCloy. Currently, U.S. Department of Energy at Hanford is in the act of constructing a waste treatment plant. They aim to store threatening nuclear waste in a glass. However, researchers have to find an alternative as the entire technetium-99 cannot be incorporated in a glass. The volatilized gas would also be needed to be recycled back into the system. These innovative ideas may pave the way for a safer future. However, for now the threat of nuclear contamination due to the high volume of nuclear waste being produced seems to be looming. It has become essential to come up with a reliable way to dispose these wastes of. The study has been published in the journal Inorganic Chemistry. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


News Article | March 1, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

RICHLAND, Wash. - Scientists have found adding a pinch of something new to a battery's electrolyte gives the energy storage devices more juice per charge than today's commonly used rechargeable batteries. New, early-stage research shows adding a small amount of the chemical lithium hexafluorophosphate to a dual-salt, carbonate solvent-based electrolyte can make rechargeable lithium-metal batteries stable, charge quickly and have a high voltage. "A good lithium-metal battery will have the same lifespan as the lithium-ion batteries that power today's electric cars and consumer electric devices, but also store more energy so we can drive longer in between charges," said chemist Wu Xu of the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Xu is a corresponding author on a paper published today in the journal Nature Energy. Most of the rechargeable batteries used today are lithium-ion batteries, which have two electrodes: one that's positively charged and contains lithium, and another negative one that's typically made of graphite. Electricity is generated when electrons flow through a wire that connects the two. To control the electrons, positively charged lithium atoms shuttle from one electrode to the other through another path, the electrolyte solution in which the electrodes sit. But graphite can't store much energy, limiting the amount of energy a lithium-ion battery can provide smart phones and electric vehicles. When lithium-based rechargeable batteries were first developed in the 1970s, researchers used lithium metal for the negative electrode, called an anode. Lithium was chosen because it has ten times more energy storage capacity than graphite. Problem was, the lithium-carrying electrolyte reacted with the lithium anode. This caused microscopic lithium nanoparticles and branches called dendrites to grow on the anode surface, and led the early batteries to fail. Many have tweaked rechargeable batteries over the years in an attempt to resolve the dendrite problem. Researchers switched to other materials such as graphite for the anode. Scientists have also coated anodes with protective layers, while others have created electrolyte additives. Some solutions eliminated dendrites but also resulted in impractical batteries with little power. Other methods only slowed, but didn't stop, dendrite growth. Thinking today's rechargeable lithium-ion batteries with graphite anodes could be near their peak energy capacity, PNNL is taking another look at the older design with lithium metal as an anode. Xu and colleagues were part of earlier PNNL research seeking a better-performing electrolyte. The electrolytes they tried produced either a battery that didn't have problematic dendrites and was super-efficient but charged very slowly and couldn't work in higher-voltage batteries, or a faster-charging battery that was unstable and had low voltages. Next, they tried adding small amounts of a salt that's already used in lithium-ion batteries, lithium hexafluorophosphate, to their fast-charging electrolyte. They paired the newly juiced-up electrolyte with a lithium anode and a lithium nickel manganese cobalt oxide cathode. It turned out to be a winning combination, resulting in a fast, efficient, high-voltage battery. The additive enabled a 4.3-volt battery that retained more than 97 percent of its initial charge after 500 repeated charges and discharges, while carrying 1.75 milliAmps of electrical current per square centimeter of area. It took the battery about one hour to fully charge. The battery performed well largely because the additive helps create a robust protective layer of carbonate polymers on the battery's lithium anode. This thin layer prevents lithium from being used up in unwanted side reactions, which can kill a battery. And, because the additive is already an established component of lithium-ion batteries, it's readily available and relatively inexpensive. The small amounts needed - just 0. 6 percent of the electrolyte by weight - should also further lower the electrolyte's cost. Xu and his team continue to evaluate several ways to make rechargeable lithium-metal batteries viable, including improving electrodes, separators and electrolytes. Specific next steps include making and testing larger quantities of their electrolyte, further improving the efficiency and capacity retention of a lithium-metal battery using their electrolyte, increasing material loading on the cathode and trying a thinner anode. This research was supported by the Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. Researchers performed microscopy and spectroscopy characterizations of battery materials at EMSL, the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a DOE Office of Science national User Facility at PNNL. The battery electrodes were made at DOE's Cell Analysis, Modeling, and Prototyping Facility at Argonne National Laboratory. EMSL, the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, is a DOE Office of Science User Facility. Located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, Wash., EMSL offers an open, collaborative environment for scientific discovery to researchers around the world. Its integrated computational and experimental resources enable researchers to realize important scientific insights and create new technologies. Follow EMSL on Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter. Interdisciplinary teams at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory address many of America's most pressing issues in energy, the environment and national security through advances in basic and applied science. Founded in 1965, PNNL employs 4,400 staff and has an annual budget of nearly $1 billion. It is managed by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science. As the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States, the Office of Science is working to address some of the most pressing challenges of our time. For more information on PNNL, visit the PNNL News Center, or follow PNNL on Facebook, Google+, Instagram, LinkedIn and Twitter.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 149.88K | Year: 2015

The longevity requirements and number of dry storage systems, employed for storage of used nuclear fuel, necessitate the deployment of sensor technologies to support aging management programs and ensure safe disposal of used nuclear fuel at the end of dry storage terms. This effort seeks to increase the value and effectiveness of dry storage system inspections with the application of readily available technologies to gain significant information regarding the state of the internal canister structural integrity or environmental conditions. Global Technology Connection, Inc. GTC), in collaboration with its partners Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Savannah River National Laboratory & NAC) , proposes to address the surveillance needs of dry storage systems already deployed in the field as well as future systems. The team will develop methods for sensing internal cask parameters using externally mounted ultrasonic sensors for currently deployed dry storage systems. For future cask systems, the team will focus on demonstrating a framework to enable monitoring of internal cask parameters with greater fidelity through the use of sensors mounted inside of dry storage systems and acoustic modems to transmit information through container walls without the need for penetration. In total, this represents a comprehensive approach to addressing the needs for monitoring the state of used fuel in long term dry storage and will have tremendous public benefit. The Phase I efforts will focus on identifying ultrasonic techniques using externally mounted sensors for measuring variables of interest inside of dry storage systems and determining design criteria for application of identified techniques to currently deployed dry storage systems. In addition, tabulation of readily available sensing technologies that meet the requirements for placement inside of dry storage systems will be created and a down-select process will identify a few candidate sensing technologies from this list that will be used to demonstrate in Phase II. The resulting technology from this effort can be applied to wide range of applications employed for monitoring of machinery and structural components. The commercial intent is to produce low-rate production quantities for commercial markets. Potential commercial applications include diagnostics/prognostics of machinery and structural health monitoring.

Loading PNNL collaborators
Loading PNNL collaborators