Plastic Logic Ltd

Cambridge, United Kingdom

Plastic Logic Ltd

Cambridge, United Kingdom
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: EPSRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 2.51M | Year: 2015

Glass has been a key material for many important advances in civilization; it was glass lenses which allowed microscopes to see bacteria for the first time and telescopes which revealed the planets and the moons of Jupiter. Glassware itself has contributed to the development of chemical, biological and cultural progress for thousands of years. The transformation of society with glass continues in modern times; as strands of glass optical fibres transform the internet and how we communicate. Today, glasses have moved beyond transparent materials, and through ongoing research have become active advanced and functional materials. Unlike conventional glasses made from silica or sand, research is now producing glasses from materials such as sulphur, which yields an unusual, yellow orange glass with incredibly varied properties. This next generation of speciality glasses are noted for their functionality and their ability to respond to optical, electrical and thermal stimuli. These glasses have the ability to switch, bend, self-organize and darken when exposed to light, they can even conduct electricity. They transmit light in the infra-red, which ordinary glass blocks and the properties of these glasses can even change, when strong light is incident upon them. The demand for speciality glass is growing and these advanced materials are of national importance for the UK. Our businesses that produce and process materials have a turnover of around £170 billion per annum; represent 15% of the countrys GDP and have exports valued at £50 billion. With our proposed research programme we will produce extremely pure, highly functional glasses, unique to the world. The aims of our proposed research are as follows: - To establish the UK as a world-leading speciality glass research and manufacturing facility - To discovery new and optimize existing glass compositions, particularly in glasses made with sulphur - To develop links with UK industry and help them to expit these new glass materials - To demonstrate important new electronic, telecommunication, switching devices from these glasses - To partner other UK Universities to explore new and emerging applications of speciality glass To achieve these goals we bring together a world-class, UK team of physicists, chemists, engineers and computer scientists from Southampton, Exeter, Oxford, Cambridge and Heriot-Watt Universities. We are partners with over 15 UK companies who will use these materials in their products or contribute to new ways of manufacturing them. This proposal therefore provides a unique opportunity to underpin a substantial national programme in speciality-glass manufacture, research and development.


Sirringhaus H.,University of Cambridge | Sirringhaus H.,Plastic Logic Ltd.
Advanced Materials | Year: 2014

Over the past 25 years, organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) have witnessed impressive improvements in materials performance by 3-4 orders of magnitude, and many of the key materials discoveries have been published in Advanced Materials. This includes some of the most recent demonstrations of organic field-effect transistors with performance that clearly exceeds that of benchmark amorphous silicon-based devices. In this article, state-of-the-art in OFETs are reviewed in light of requirements for demanding future applications, in particular active-matrix addressing for flexible organic light-emitting diode (OLED) displays. An overview is provided over both small molecule and conjugated polymer materials for which field-effect mobilities exceeding > 1 cm2 V-1 s-1 have been reported. Current understanding is also reviewed of their charge transport physics that allows reaching such unexpectedly high mobilities in these weakly van der Waals bonded and structurally comparatively disordered materials with a view towards understanding the potential for further improvement in performance in the future. The mobility of organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) has improved dramatically over the past 25 years, and now exceeds that of amorphous silicon. OFETs are being used in products such as flexible electronic paper displays. Current understanding of the charge transport physics that allows such unexpectedly high mobilities to be reached in van der Waals-bonded molecular and polymeric semiconductors is reviewed. © 2014 The Authors. Published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.


Patent
Plastic Logic Ltd | Date: 2013-05-22

A flexible electronic reading device, the device comprising a display part and a handle, wherein said display part comprises: a display backplane on a flexible substrate; and a display mounted over said display backplane; wherein said handle is located at one edge of said display backplane and contains display interface electronics for said display; and wherein said display part of said electronic reading device comprises a unitary, continuous structure lacking a separate housing.


Patent
PLASTIC LOGIC Ltd | Date: 2015-10-13

A technique comprising: securing a device substrate (8) to a carrier (1) using one or more adhesive elements (6); forming electronic elements (10) on the device substrate with the device substrate thus secured to the carrier; and thereafter reducing the adhesion strength of at least one of the one or more adhesive elements to facilitate the release of the substrate from the carrier.


Patent
PLASTIC LOGIC Ltd | Date: 2015-10-13

A technique comprising: securing a device substrate (8) to a carrier (1) using one or more adhesive elements (6); forming electronic elements (10) on the device substrate with the device substrate thus secured to the carrier; and thereafter reducing the adhesion strength of at least one of the one or more adhesive elements to facilitate the release of the substrate from the carrier.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2013.3.3 | Award Amount: 4.27M | Year: 2013

We have seen a large rise of novel and user-friendly interfaces that move beyond the paradigm of mouse and keyboard for input. Multi-touch screens are now the de-facto standard in mobile devices such as phones and tablets. This rise in adoption of such natural user interfaces shows there is a great deal of user demand for simpler ways of navigating information and content, where the computer interface is not a barrier, but enables them to accomplish tasks more quickly and easily.\nArguably whilst the input between user and computer has become greatly enriched due to innovations in user sensing technologies such as touch and depth sensors, there has been less significant work that has explored novel output or display mechanisms coupled with this novel input. FLASHED will address this challenge of building a novel user interface device that couples novel input with output.\nA major problem of flexible displays is still the lack of interactivity, because none of the market-ready touch solutions are flexible. Therefore, one major goal of FLASHED is the development of novel, flexible touchscreen solutions, covering aspects like cost-effectiveness and energy-efficiency. Moreover, the FLASHED project puts strong emphasis on user-friendly interfaces. The FLASHED device itself consists of a flexible display, a touchscreen layer using a force-sensing touch array and a feedback actuator layer .\nThe R&D work starts with research into developing new ink-materials for the touchscreen as well as the feedback actuator layer and with the development of the layers, of the microcontroller, and of the software. Based on these input layers, we will integrate them with the flexible display and implement demonstrators. Formative evaluation combined with a two-round development process will ensure that the FLASHED results fit its users needs while summative evaluation will validate the overall utility of the approach to promote flexible interactive surfaces.


Patent
PLASTIC LOGIC Ltd | Date: 2013-06-19

A method is provided to isolated conductive pads on top of a multi-layer polymer device structure. The method utilizes laser radiation to ablate conductive material and create a non-conductive path, electrically isolating the conductive pads. The process is self-limiting and incorporates at least one layer within the stack that absorbs the radiation at the required wavelength. The prevention of radiation degradation of the underlying layers is achieved, as absorption of radiation occurs primarily on the surface of the structure, but not in any of the radiation sensitive underlying layers of the electronic device. The method preferably uses low energy infrared radiation which has been shown to produce little debris and no device degradation.


Patent
Plastic Logic Ltd | Date: 2013-02-11

A method for forming an electronic device having a multilayer structure, comprising: embossing a surface of a substrate so as to depress first and second regions of the substrate relative to at least a third region of the substrate; depositing conductive or semiconductive material from solution onto the first and second regions of the substrate so as to form a first electrode on the first region and a second electrode on the second region, wherein the electrodes are electrically insulated from each other by the third region.


Patent
Plastic Logic Ltd | Date: 2014-09-19

An integrated circuit (IC) for driving a flexible display includes a first layer including spatially non-repetitive features, the first layer deposited on a flexible substrate, the spatially non-repetitive features not substantially regularly repeating in both of two orthogonal directions (x,y) in the plane of the substrate. The IC further includes a second layer including spatially repetitive features with the second layer being deposited on said first layer. The first and second layers are aligned to one another so as to allow electrical coupling between said non-repetitive and said repetitive features, and wherein distortion compensation is applied during deposition of said repetitive features to enable said alignment.


Patent
PLASTIC LOGIC Ltd | Date: 2013-07-08

We describe a method of reducing artefacts in an image displayed by an active matrix electro-optic display and display driver, the electro-optic display driver comprising a plurality of active matrix pixel drivers each driving a respective pixel of the electro-optic display, each active matrix pixel driver having an associated storage capacitor coupled to a common backplane connection of the display driver, pixels of the electro-optic display having a common pixel electrode, the method comprising: driving the electro-optic display with a null frame during a power-down procedure of the display.

Loading Plastic Logic Ltd collaborators
Loading Plastic Logic Ltd collaborators