Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery

Baton Rouge, LA, United States

Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery

Baton Rouge, LA, United States
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News Article | May 8, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

MARINA DEL REY, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Grant Stevens, M.D., FACS, a board certified plastic surgeon, founder and medical director of Marina Plastic Surgery in Marina del Rey, CA, and an international traveling professor, was elected president-elect of the American Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgery (ASAPS) at the Aesthetic Meeting this month in San Diego, CA. ASAPS is the leading national aesthetic medical organization comprising more than 2,600 board certified plastic surgeons who specialize in face and body aesthetic surgery. Also elected are Clyde H. Ishii, MD, Honolulu, president; Charles Thorne, MD, New York, vice president; Herluf G. Lund Jr., MD, St. Louis, treasurer; and William P. Adams, Jr., MD, Dallas, secretary. Dr. Stevens is a clinical professor of plastic surgery, University of Southern California, as well as Chairman of the USC-Marina Aesthetic Surgery Fellowship and Director of the USC Division of Aesthetic Surgery. He is featured in Castle Connolly's "Top Doctor Guide" recognizing him as one of the best plastic surgeons in America and is one of the select few to be featured in "Plastic Surgery: The World's Top Surgeons & Clinics." Dr. Stevens is an active member at Marina Del Rey Hospital, where he is the past Chairman of the Department of Surgery, the Chairman of the Liposuction Committee, and the Medical Director of The Breast Center. He is also on staff at St. John's Medical Center, the Marina Outpatient Surgery Center and USC. Dr. Stevens graduated with honors from Washington University Medical School in St. Louis where he was awarded the Senior Prize in Surgery. He completed his general surgery training at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, then returned to Washington University-Barnes Hospital where he completed a Fellowship in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery with Dr. Paul Weeks, Dr. Leroy Young, Dr. Tom Mustoe, Dr. Jeffrey Marsh and Dr. R. Christie Wray. He is a board-certified Diplomate of the American Board of Plastic Surgery, a Fellow of the American College of Surgeons and the International College of Surgeons. He was appointed by the governor of California to the Medical Board of California Medical Quality Review Board. Dr. Stevens is an ASAPS Traveling Professor and has been an invited visiting professor at numerous U.S. and international universities. Dr. Stevens is a third vice president on the board of directors of the International Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgery (ISAPS) and he is on the Board of Directors and one of the International Traveling Professors. Dr. Stevens has authored more than 70 articles and chapters on aesthetic plastic surgery. He recently completed a chapter on mastopexy and mastopexy augmentation in Grabb and Smith. Dr. Stevens is a member of many medical societies, including ASAPS, ISAPS, the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, the International College of Surgeons, the American College of Surgeons and the American Society for Laser Medicine & Surgery. Dr. Stevens is the past Chairman of the California Medical Association Advisory Panel on Plastic Surgery. He received the California State Assembly and the California State Senate Certificate of Recognition. He has also received the Special Congressional Certificate of Recognition and the Distinguished Service Citation from the Medical Board of California. For more information, visit Marina Plastic Surgery; like Marina Plastic Surgery on Facebook; sign up for the blog BeautyByStevens.com and follow on Twitter @DrGrantStevens.


News Article | April 27, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

School bullies and their victims are more likely to want plastic surgery than other teens -- new University of Warwick research School bullies and their victims are more likely to want cosmetic surgery, according to new research by the University of Warwick. Professor Dieter Wolke -- and colleagues in the Department of Psychology and Warwick Medical School -- have discovered that teenagers who are affected by bullying in any way have a greater desire than others to change their bodies by going under the knife. Almost 2800 adolescents -- aged 11 to 16 -- in UK secondary schools were screened for their involvement in bullying, through self and peer assessment. A sample group of around 800 adolescents -- including bullies, victims, those who both bully and are bullied, and those who are unaffected by bullying - was analysed for emotional problems, levels of self-esteem and body-esteem, and the extent of their desire to have plastic surgery. They were asked to complete established questionnaires -- such as the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire and the Acceptance of Cosmetic Surgery Scale. The results showed that adolescents involved in bullying in any role were more interested in cosmetic surgery, compared to those uninvolved in bullying. Desire for cosmetic surgery was highest in victims of bullying, but was also increased in bullying perpetrators. 11.5% of bullying victims have an extreme desire to have cosmetic surgery, as well as 3.4% of bullies, and 8.8% of teenagers who both bully and are bullied - this is compared with less than 1% of those who are unaffected by bullying. Girls want to go under the knife more than boys. Of the sample group, 7.3% of girls had an extreme wish to have plastic surgery, compared with 2% of boys. The researchers state that perpetrators of bullying want to have plastic surgery to improve their appearance and increase their social status. . Victims of bullying, on the other hand, want to go under the knife because their psychological functioning is affected by being picked on - giving them lower self-esteem, more emotional problems and a desire to change their appearance. Between 2014 and 2015, 15.9 million surgical and minimally invasive procedures were performed in the United States. Almost 230,000 of those procedures were performed on 13-19 year olds. Rates of cosmetic surgery are similarly increasing in the United Kingdom and across the world. Young people could have less of a desire for plastic surgery if mental health issues arising from bullying are addressed, according to the authors. The researchers suggest that cosmetic surgeons screen potential patients for a history of bullying, and any related psychological issues. Professor Wolke and his co-authors comment: "Being victimized by peers resulted in poor psychological functioning, which increased desire for cosmetic surgery. For bullies, cosmetic surgery may simply be another tactic to increase social status [...] to look good and achieve dominance. "The desire for cosmetic surgery in bullied adolescents is immediate and long-lasting. "Our results suggest that cosmetic surgeons should screen candidates for psychological vulnerability and history of bullying." The research, 'Adolescent Desire for Cosmetic Surgery: Associations with Bullying and Psychological Functioning', is published in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. It is co-authored by Kirsty Lee, Ph.D., Alexa Guy, M.Res., Jeremy Dale, Ph.D., M.B.B.S., F.R.C.G.P.


News Article | May 22, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

A team from Stellenbosch University (SU) and the Tygerberg Academic Hospital has recently performed a second penis transplant, making it the first medical centre in the world to successfully perform this procedure twice. Prof André van der Merwe, Head of the Division of Urology at SU's Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences (FMHS), led the marathon operation of nine and a half hours performed on 21 April at Tygerberg Hospital in Cape Town, South Africa. The recipient was a 40 year old male who had lost his penis 17 years ago due to complications after a traditional circumcision. His identity is being protected for ethical reasons. "He is certainly one of the happiest patients we have seen in our ward. He is doing remarkably well. There are no signs of rejection and all the reconnected structures seem to be healing well," says Van der Merwe. The patient is expected to regain all urinary and reproductive functions of the organ within six months of the transplant. A colour discrepancy between the recipient and the donor organ will be corrected with medical tattooing between six to eight months after the operation. "The success of this procedure in the hands of our transplant team is testimony to the high level of skill and expertise that exists in the public health sector in South Africa," says Prof Jimmy Volmink, Dean of the FMHS. "Also of considerable pride is the team's ability to balance compassionate and ethical patient care on the one hand, with a concern for the efficient use of scarce resources on the other." "This is a remarkable, ground-breaking procedure. I would like to congratulate the Tygerberg Hospital and the SU surgeons for doing such a sterling job. Traditional circumcision has claimed many young lives in South Africa. For this patient, life will never be the same again," said Dr Nomafrench Mbombo, Western Cape health minister. "Patients describe a penis transplant as 'receiving a new life'. For these men the penis defines manhood and the loss of this organ causes tremendous emotional and psychological distress," says Dr Amir Zarrabi of the FMHS's Division of Urology, who was a member of the transplant team. "I usually see cases of partial or total amputations in July and December - the period when traditional circumcisions are performed." "We are thrilled on behalf of the patient and the change it will make in his life," says Dr Alexander Zühlke, who heads the FMHS's Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. "It is also a great achievement to be part of the team that has performed two successful penis transplants." The team consisted of Van der Merwe, Zühlke, Prof Rafique Moosa, head of the FMHS's Department of Medicine, Zarrabi and Dr Zamira Keyser of Tygerberg Hospital. They were assisted by transplant coordinators, anaesthetists, theatre nurses, a psychologist, an ethicist and other support staff. In December 2014 Van der Merwe and his team performed the world's first successful penis transplant and more than two years later "the patient is doing extremely well, both physically and mentally", says Van der Merwe. "He is living a normal life. His urinary and sexual functions have returned to normal, and he has virtually forgotten that he had a transplant." Penile mutilation is more common in South Africa than elsewhere in the world due to complications of circumcisions performed as part of a traditional rite of passage on young men in certain cultures. There is no formal record of the yearly number of penile amputations due to traditional circumcisions, but one study reported up to 55 cases in the Eastern Cape alone. Experts estimate that as many as 250 partial and total amputations take place country-wide every year, with suicides also being reported. "At Stellenbosch University and Tygerberg Hospital we are committed to finding cost-effective solutions to help these men," says Van der Merwe. The procedure was part of a proof of concept study to develop a cost-effective penile transplant procedure that could be performed in a typical theatre setting in a South African public sector hospital. By applying lessons learnt from the first transplant, Van der Merwe and his team were able to significantly cut the costs of the second procedure. The biggest challenge to this SU study is organ donation. "I think the lack of penis transplants across the world since we performed the first one in 2014, is mostly due to a lack of donors. It might be easier to donate organs that you cannot see, like a kidney, than something like a hand or a penis," says Van der Merwe. "We are extremely grateful to the donor's family who so generously donated not only the penis, but also the kidneys, skin and corneas of their beloved son. Through this donation they are changing the lives of many patients." The world's first successful penile transplant was performed by Van der Merwe and his team at Tygerberg Hospital in Cape Town on 11 December 2014. The second was done a year and a half later, on 16 May 2016, at the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston in the United States of America. Visit http://www. for more information, video, photos and graphics The entire penis was carefully dissected from the donor to keep blood vessels, nerves and other connecting structures intact. These were marked and connected to the recipient's correlating tissue during the transplant. It is a complex procedure known as a composite tissue transplant, during which different types of tissue (nerves, blood vessels, muscle etc.) are cross-connected between the recipient and the donor organ. The surgeons connected three blood vessels (each between 1 and 2 mm in diameter) to ensure sufficient blood flow to the transplanted organ; two dorsal nerves (also between 1 and 2 mm in diameter) to restore sensation; the urethra, which enables the recipient to urinate through the penis; as well as the corpus cavernosum (cavernous body of the penis), which will allow the patient to obtain an erection. "The diverse presentation of the blood vessels and nerves makes the operation very challenging and means each case is unique. All these structures need to be treated with the utmost delicacy and respect in order to be connected perfectly to ensure good circulation and function in the long term," says Zühlke. Micro-surgery was used to connect small blood vessels and nerves. The patient has since returned for a minor procedure to remove a small piece of dead tissue on the skin edges. Through a process called an immune response, the body naturally rejects any foreign object inserted into or attached to it. During an organ transplant, this immune response has to be suppressed to prevent the body from rejecting the transplanted organ. An immune response can only be avoided in cases where the patient's own tissue, or that of an identical twin, is used. "Transplants where several types of tissue are involved (muscles, nerves, blood vessels, etc.) require stronger immunosuppression treatment than transplants of organs involving fewer cells, such as kidneys," explains Moosa. The immunosuppression medication used during penis transplants, although not usually used as a first-line treatment, is available in state facilities and is generally used after kidney transplants. Although the dosage is reduced as time goes on, transplant patients have to take immunosuppression medication for the rest of their lives - even if they have made a full recovery. Permission for the study was granted by SU's Health Research Ethics Committee (HREC) in 2011 and the transplant team has been in close consultation with ethicists and the HREC throughout the design and conduct of the study. According to Dr Nicola Barsdorf, Head of Health Research Ethics at the FMHS, the research team adequately addressed the important ethical issue of therapeutic misconception (the risk that a research participant may not fully understand that this treatment is only experimental). "The patient was repeatedly counselled over an extended period of time about the potential benefits and risks of the procedure. He had a clear understanding about the experimental nature of the transplant and provided his informed consent after multiple, comprehensive discussions about the voluntary nature of his participation," explains Barsdorf. According to Barsdorf, careful consideration during the planning phase of the study allowed them to anticipate potential pitfalls, including: All patients considered for the study have to undergo extensive psychological evaluation to determine whether they are mentally fit to receive a transplant. Organ transplantation could have a negative psychological effect if patients can't associate with the organ. Advancements in technology have expanded the age old custom of tattooing for medical purposes. Micro-dermal pigmentation is currently used to improve the appearance of individuals with medically-related physical imperfections. Nipple and areola reconstruction by means of tattooing after a mastectomy is probably the most well-known application of this procedure. It goes a long way to help women regain their confidence and improve their self-image. Reconstructive medical tattooing can also camouflage the appearance of ugly scars due to accidents, burn wounds and surgery. Furthermore, it is used to camouflage vitiligo (patches of white skin), using flesh-coloured pigments, or to help restore the appearance of missing hair lost due to disease (cancer or alopecia) or trauma. According to Zühlke medical tattooing can also be applied in the case of penis transplants if there is a colour discrepancy between the donor and the recipient. This should be performed by a tattoo artist who has specialised in medical tattooing. Although there is no experience with such a procedure, since the current transplant is only the third case in the world and tattooing has not been necessary in the other two cases, it would typically be performed from six months onwards after the operation and more than one session would probably be necessary. Current surgical options for patients include penis reconstruction involving free tissue transfer. During this procedure skin and soft tissue ("flap") is taken from the arm, reconstructed into a penis and attached to the body. A prosthesis can also be implanted to allow sexual intercourse, but it is expensive and complications may develop.


News Article | May 16, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Pousti Plastic Surgery is pleased and excited to announce recent partnerships with major San Diego hotels near the San Diego plastic surgery Practice in order to better serve the Practice’s growing Canadian patient base. For almost two decades, Double Board Certified Chief Surgeon, Dr. Tom Pousti, has been growing his private Practice in Southern California, and his exceptional reputation in plastic and cosmetic surgery has lead to an increasing out of town patient base from Canada. Canadian patients have traveled from all major metropolitan cities including Vancouver, Calgary, Quebec, Ottawa, Hamilton, and Winnipeg as well as from less populated Canadian provinces. Based on his extensive reputation and experience in cosmetic and plastic surgery, particularly with Canadian patients, candidates are willing to travel very long distances in order for Dr. Tom Pousti to complete their surgical procedure. With breast augmentation and revisionary breast surgery as the most popular procedures among Canadian patients, the plastic surgery Practice understands that serving out of town patients requires a different and more effective communication strategy to ensure patient success. Pousti Plastic Surgery has developed an efficient communication procedure to make the due diligence, goals, surgical and recovery process successful and convenient for the patient. Because Dr. Pousti strongly recommends that patients stay in the San Diego area for a minimum of 5-7 days after surgery, the Practice has strengthened their commitment to out of town patients by partnering with major local hotels in the greater Mission Valley area in close proximity to the Practice’s surgery center and office. Pousti Plastic Surgery has negotiated preferred pricing with The Holiday Inn, Handlery Hotel and Resort, and the DoubleTree Mission Valley hotels as a courtesy and benefit for Canadian patients. Canadian patients are encouraged to start by visiting the Practice’s website for more information, before and after photos, procedure information, videos and testimonials specifically from past Canadian patients. From there, patients are encouraged to contact the Practice and provide digital photos and patient goals for Dr. Pousti to review. The plastic surgery team will then assist the patient through the rest of the consult process and answer all questions. Tom Pousti, M.D., F.A.C.S is double board certified in General Surgery as well as Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. He has been a licensed physician for over 23 years and has been in private practice in Southern California for nearly 19 years. Dr. Pousti completed his Plastic Surgery training at Harvard with world-renowned surgeons at The Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts. As a San Diego cosmetic surgery and La Jolla plastic surgery specialist, Dr. Pousti focuses on breast surgery, body contouring, facial rejuvenation and all types of revisionary surgery, and sees patients from all over the United States, Canada and worldwide. For more information on Dr. Tom J. Pousti, MD, F.A.C.S, please visit Pousti Plastic Surgery’s website at http://www.poustiplasticsurgery.com or call (619) 466-8851.


News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The May 15th issue of Life & Style magazine, on news stands now, features two of the country’s most respected facial plastic surgeons, Dr. Ben Talei and Dr. Ben Stong. These leading plastic surgeons discuss the considerable benefits of cosmetic surgery after cancer treatment. The article highlights the story of Angie Everhart, a popular cover model who turned to Dr. Talei for facial plastic surgery after her thyroid cancer recovery. As a teen, Everhart became a cover model for fashion magazines such as Elle and Glamour. She went on to appear in several Sports Illustrated swimsuit issues as well as Playboy magazine. After battling thyroid cancer in 2013, Everhart sought Dr. Talei’s expertise to counteract the facial aging effects of her cancer and the radiation treatment it demanded. With her cancer gone, Angie Everhart simply wanted to look as good as she felt, a common desire in patients who choose facial plastic surgery. Dr. Ben Talei, Director of the Beverly Hills Center for Plastic & Laser Surgery, was able to help Everhart by performing one of his specialties in cosmetic surgery, the AuraLyft. The AuraLyft is a modified facelift pioneered by Dr. Talei, where incisions are made under the muscles of the face, not just the skin. It can be performed painlessly using only local anesthesia, without the need for a general anesthetic. Everhart is thrilled with the results, stating in the Life & Style article “I look refreshed – like I’ve been to a spa!” Dr. Benjamin Stong of Kalos Facial Plastic Surgery in Atlanta also comments on Everhart’s plastic surgery in the Life & Style magazine story, “With Dr. Talei’s facelift surgery the results are absolutely natural and there is no need for ancillary procedures. The face is never made to look pulled or stretched. It’s beyond impressive.” Dr. Stong is a world-class facial plastic surgeon with highly esteemed training, experience and recognition in his field. He performs an extended, mini deep plane facelift in his own practice, using a technique that aligns very closely with the AuraLyft and produces the same unrivaled results. “Plastic surgery after cancer treatment can be the final catalyst to helping patients physically and emotionally overcome such a difficult stage in their lives,” says Dr. Ben Talei. “It’s very fulfilling to be able to positively contribute to that process.” About Dr. Ben Talei and Beverly Hills Center of Plastic and Laser Surgery: A native of California, Dr. Benjamin Talei graduated from the University of California, Los Angeles with a degree in Physiological Sciences. He received his medical degree at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine. Dr. Talei went on to complete his residency training in Head and Neck Surgery at Columbia University and Cornell University Medical Centers, New York Presbyterian Hospital. Following his residency program, Dr. Talei became one of the only surgeons in the country to complete two separate fellowships in Facial & Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery including a fellowship at the Vascular Birthmark Institute of New York. In addition, Dr. Talei is a respected author, speaker and humanitarian. About Dr. Benjamin Stong and Kalos Facial Plastic Surgery, LLC: Owner and facial plastic surgeon, Dr. Benjamin Stong is dual board certified in Head and Neck Surgery and Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. He completed his fellowship under one of the most nationally renowned plastic surgeons, Dr. Andrew Jacono in New York. He has combined such a reputable level of training with his own proven experience and talent to bring patients of Atlanta outstanding results in all aspects of surgical and non-surgical cosmetic surgery. In his career thus far, Dr. Stong has earned high prestige in his field publishing multiple journal articles and book chapters over his career. He is also a Castle Connolly Top Doctors award for consecutive years. Dr. Stong also specializes in hair transplantation as well as the most innovative treatments in facial rejuvenation at The K Spa in Atlanta. For additional information on Dr. Talei and the Beverly Hills Center for Plastic and Laser Surgery please visit beverlyhillscenter.com or call (310) 288-0641. For additional information on Dr. Stong and Kalos Facial Plastic Surgery please visit http://www.kalos-plasticsurgery.com or call 404-963-6665.


May 26, 2017 - For some patients undergoing intestinal or multi-organ transplantation, closing the abdominal wall poses a difficult surgical challenge. Total abdominal wall transplantation provides an alternative for abdominal closure in these complex cases, according to a state-of-the-art approach presented in the June issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS). ASPS Member Surgeon David Light, MD, and colleagues of the Cleveland Clinic identify the anatomy and describe a dissection technique for total abdominal wall transplantation. They believe their approach provides a new option for organ transplant recipients with severe abdominal wall defects, when conventional reconstructive techniques aren't sufficient to close the abdomen. In some patients undergoing intestinal and/or multiple organ transplants, gaps or defects of the abdominal wall make it difficult to close the abdomen using the patient's own tissues. Several factors contribute to these problems--particularly the fact that these patients typically have a long history of serious health issues with many previous surgeries. One study found that traditional abdominal wall closure was not possible in 20 percent of intestinal transplant patients. Partial abdominal wall transplant techniques have been reported, but these do not provide sufficient coverage for the largest abdominal wall defects. In a series of cadaver dissections, the researchers demonstrate the anatomy of the abdominal wall, with special attention to the four major arteries providing its blood supply. Their paper includes imaging studies illustrating each artery's contribution to blood flow in the abdominal wall. The researchers also outline a system classifying the various types of abdominal wall defects and the appropriate options for achieving closure. Conventional reconstructive techniques are suitable for patients with less-extensive defects, Dr. Light and colleagues believe that total abdominal wall transplantation is most appropriate for cases in which the defect comprises at least half of the abdominal wall. Abdominal wall transplantation is a vascularized composite allotransplant (VCA)--a term referring to transplant procedures combining different types of tissues, such as skin, muscle, and blood vessels. Face and hand transplants are the best-known types of VCA. Abdominal wall transplantation is an option for patients who are also undergoing organ transplantation--and thus will already be taking lifelong immunosuppressive therapy to prevent transplant rejection. A recent article in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery reported the successful use of a VCA to reconstruct a complex scalp defect in a patient undergoing a kidney/pancreas transplant. Dr. Light and coauthors believe that total abdominal wall transplantation should be considered among the alternatives for intestinal or multiple organ transplant patients who have major abdominal wall defects that can't be managed by conventional reconstructive techniques. The researchers add, "Our algorithm will guide practicing surgeons in the reconstruction of complex abdominal wall defects." Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery® is published by Wolters Kluwer. Click here to read "Total Abdominal Wall Transplantation: An Anatomical Study and Classification System." For more than 70 years, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery® (http://www. ) has been the one consistently excellent reference for every specialist who uses plastic surgery techniques or works in conjunction with a plastic surgeon. The official journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery® brings subscribers up-to-the-minute reports on the latest techniques and follow-up for all areas of plastic and reconstructive surgery, including breast reconstruction, experimental studies, maxillofacial reconstruction, hand and microsurgery, burn repair, and cosmetic surgery, as well as news on medico-legal issues The American Society of Plastic Surgeons is the largest organization of board-certified plastic surgeons in the world. Representing more than 7,000 physician members, the Society is recognized as a leading authority and information source on cosmetic and reconstructive plastic surgery. ASPS comprises more than 94 percent of all board-certified plastic surgeons in the United States. Founded in 1931, the Society represents physicians certified by The American Board of Plastic Surgery or The Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada. Wolters Kluwer N.V. (AEX: WKL) is a global leader in information services and solutions for professionals in the health, tax and accounting, risk and compliance, finance and legal sectors. We help our customers make critical decisions every day by providing expert solutions that combine deep domain knowledge with specialized technology and services. Wolters Kluwer reported 2016 annual revenues of €4.3 billion. The company, headquartered in Alphen aan den Rijn, the Netherlands, serves customers in over 180 countries, maintains operations in over 40 countries and employs 19,000 people worldwide. Wolters Kluwer shares are listed on Euronext Amsterdam (WKL) and are included in the AEX and Euronext 100 indices. Wolters Kluwer has a sponsored Level 1 American Depositary Receipt program. The ADRs are traded on the over-the-counter market in the U.S. (WTKWY). For more information about our solutions and organization, visit http://www. , follow us on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, and YouTube.


In a path breaking feat in medical history, a team of doctors from the Tygerberg Academic Hospital and the Stellenbosch University performed a successful penis transplant. This is the first medical center in the world to perform the rare medical procedure successfully, twice in a row. The operation lasted for nine and a half hours and was conducted on April 21 at the Tygerberg Hospital in Cape Town, South Africa. Stellenbosch University's professor André Van der Merwe headed the surgery, which was performed on a 40-year-old male. The patient lost his penis 17 years back because of a traditional circumcision going wrong. The patient's identity is being protected for ethical reasons. "He is doing remarkably well. There are no signs of rejection and all the reconnected structures seem to be healing well," Van der Merwe noted. The doctors and surgeons expect the patient to regain sexual and urinary functions using the newly-transplanted organ within the next six months. However, the transplanted penis' does not match the recipient's skin color. To correct this issue, the doctors will resort to medical tattooing six to eight months after the surgery. It is likely that over one session will be required. The South African medical team that performed the penis transplant included Stellenbosch University's Van der Merwe and Alexander Zühlke, who is the head of the Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at the university's FMHS. Tyberg Hospital's Dr Zamira Keyser and FMHS' Rafique Moosa and Amir Zarrabi also assisted in the surgery. The team of surgeons were helped by anesthetists, nurses, transplant coordinators, an ethicist, a psychologist, and other support staff. The same team is credited with performing the world's first penis transplant in December 2014. After over two years, the doctors say that the patient is doing "extremely well, both physically and mentally." Western Cape's health minister Nomafrench Mbombo congratulated the team of surgeons and staff of Tygerberg Hospital for making this feat possible. He also admitted that traditional circumcision led to the death of quite a few young South Africans. While people would be familiar with traditional tattooing, the process is also used in the medical field thanks to technological advancements. Basically, reconstructive medical tattooing uses micro-dermal pigments to enhance the look of an individual's medical-related imperfections. One of the most common and well-known medical tattooing applications is areola and nipple reconstruction post mastectomy. This process aids the patient in regaining confidence and boost's their self-esteem post the surgery. Another benefit of medical tattooing is that it camouflage's unsightly scars that occur post a burn wound, surgery, or accident. Medical tattooing can also be used for camouflaging white skin patches or vitiligo. This is done with the aid of pigments that are skin colored. The technique is also used in the restoration of hair that one loses because of diseases such as alopecia or cancer. According to the doctors who performed the procedure on the 40-year-old man, medical tattooing can be used for penis transplant as well. It can be used if a color difference exists between the recipient's skin and the donated penis — as in the case of the latest surgery. However, doctors caution that only a tattoo artist specializing in medical tattooing should perform the procedure. Penile mutilation is a common traditional practice in South Africa. It is not that common in any other part of the world due to the complications associated with the practice. In penile mutilation, the penis of young men undergoes circumcision as a traditional rite of passage in some cultures. Currently, no official record on the number of penile mutilations conducted in Africa exists. However, a study states that there are roughly 55 cases of traditional penile mutilation in the country's Eastern Cape alone. Experts believe that approximately 250 total and partial penile amputations are carried out in the country each year. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


News Article | May 26, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

May 26, 2017 - Skull fractures and other head and facial injuries from motorcycle trauma in Michigan have doubled since that state relaxed its motorcycle helmet laws, reports a study in the June issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS). The new study is one of the first to focus on how helmet laws affect CMF trauma rates. "Our study demonstrates the negative impact of weakened motorcycle helmet laws leading to decreased helmet use," said lead author Nicholas S. Adams, MD, of Michigan State University College of Human Medicine and Spectrum Health, Grand Rapids. The findings suggest that higher numbers of craniomaxillofacial (CMF) injuries can be added to increased deaths, serious injuries and health care costs when motorcyclists ride without helmets. The researchers used a state trauma quality improvement database to analyze changes in the rate of CMF injuries to motorcycle riders since the change in Michigan helmet laws. In 2012, Michigan repealed its universal motorcycle helmet law in favor of a partial law. Under the new law, riders are eligible to ride without helmets if they meet criteria for age (over 21), training/experience and insurance coverage. Trends in CMF injuries were analyzed for three years before and three years after the change in helmet laws. The study included a total of 4,643 motorcycle trauma patients seen at 29 Michigan trauma centers. Under the new law, the proportion of motorcycle trauma patients who were riding without helmets more than doubled, from 20 to 44 percent. Compared to helmeted patients, those not wearing helmets were about twice as likely to sustain CMF injuries. The difference was significant for fractures and soft tissue injuries. Patients without helmets had higher injury severity scores. Before and after the change in helmet laws, unhelmeted patients had higher blood alcohol content. The absolute rate of CMF injuries increased from 25.5 percent under the universal helmet law to 37.2 percent under the partial helmet law. This translated into a relative 46 percent increase in overall CMF injuries, including a 28 percent increase in fractures and a 56 percent increase in soft tissue injuries. The researchers also noted an increase in certain patterns of facial injuries after the change in helmet laws. Fractures of the cheekbones (malar fractures) increased significantly, as did facial lacerations, contusions and abrasions. All types of injuries were more common in unhelmeted patients. There is a long history of debate over motorcycle helmet laws. Previous studies have shown that helmets prevent nearly 40 percent of fatal injuries and 13 percent of nonfatal serious injuries. Yet, up to one-third of motorcycle riders do not wear helmets, even more in states without universal helmet laws. Dr. Adams said, "We urge state and national legislators to reestablish universal motorcycle helmet laws." Based on their findings, the researchers estimate that wearing a motorcycle helmet can decrease the risk of facial trauma by half, while requiring all riders to wear helmets could decrease facial injuries by more than 30 percent. Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery® is published by Wolters Kluwer. Click here to read "The Effects of Motorcycle Helmet Legislation on Craniomaxillofacial Injuries." Article: "The Effects of Motorcycle Helmet Legislation on Craniomaxillofacial Injuries" (doi: 10.1097/PRS.0000000000003370) For more than 70 years, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery® (http://www. ) has been the one consistently excellent reference for every specialist who uses plastic surgery techniques or works in conjunction with a plastic surgeon. The official journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery® brings subscribers up-to-the-minute reports on the latest techniques and follow-up for all areas of plastic and reconstructive surgery, including breast reconstruction, experimental studies, maxillofacial reconstruction, hand and microsurgery, burn repair, and cosmetic surgery, as well as news on medico-legal issues The American Society of Plastic Surgeons is the largest organization of board-certified plastic surgeons in the world. Representing more than 7,000 physician members, the Society is recognized as a leading authority and information source on cosmetic and reconstructive plastic surgery. ASPS comprises more than 94 percent of all board-certified plastic surgeons in the United States. Founded in 1931, the Society represents physicians certified by The American Board of Plastic Surgery or The Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada. Wolters Kluwer N.V. (AEX: WKL) is a global leader in information services and solutions for professionals in the health, tax and accounting, risk and compliance, finance and legal sectors. We help our customers make critical decisions every day by providing expert solutions that combine deep domain knowledge with specialized technology and services. Wolters Kluwer reported 2016 annual revenues of €4.3 billion. The company, headquartered in Alphen aan den Rijn, the Netherlands, serves customers in more than180 countries, maintains operations in more than40 countries and employs 19,000 people worldwide. Wolters Kluwer shares are listed on Euronext Amsterdam (WKL) and are included in the AEX and Euronext 100 indices. Wolters Kluwer has a sponsored Level 1 American Depositary Receipt program. The ADRs are traded on the over-the-counter market in the U.S. (WTKWY). For more information about our solutions and organization, visit http://www. , follow us on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, and YouTube.


News Article | February 23, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

San Diego plastic and cosmetic surgery Practice, Pousti Plastic Surgery, is pleased and excited to announce recent partnerships with major San Diego hotels in order to better serve the Practice’s growing out of town patient base. For almost two decades, Double Board Certified Chief Surgeon, Dr. Tom Pousti, has been growing his private Practice in Southern California, and his exceptional reputation in plastic and cosmetic surgery has lead to an increasing out of town patient base. For nearly 20 years, out of town patients have traveled from all parts of the United States as well as internationally from Countries including Australia, Canada, Jamaica, the United Kingdom, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Greece and the Middle East. Due to his extensive reputation and experience in cosmetic and plastic surgery, patients travel very long distances in order for Dr. Tom Pousti to complete their surgical procedure. The plastic surgery Practice understands that serving out of town patients requires a different and more effective communication strategy to ensure patient success. Pousti Plastic Surgery has developed an efficient communication procedure to make the due diligence, goals, surgical and recovery process successful and convenient for the patient. Because Dr. Pousti strongly recommends that patients stay in San Diego for a minimum of 5-7 days after surgery, the Practice has taken their commitment to out of town patients one step further by partnering with major local hotels in the greater Mission Valley area in close proximity to the Practice’s surgery center and office. Pousti Plastic Surgery has negotiated preferred pricing with The Holiday Inn, Handlery Hotel and Resort, and the DoubleTree Mission Valley hotels as a courtesy and benefit for out of town patients. Out of town patients are encouraged to start by visiting the Practice’s website for more information, before and after photos, procedure information, videos and testimonials. From there, patients are encouraged to contact the Practice and provide digital photos and patient goals for Dr. Pousti to review. The plastic surgery team will then help the out of town patient through the rest of the consult process and answer all questions. Tom Pousti, M.D., F.A.C.S is double board certified in General Surgery as well as Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. He has been a licensed physician for over 23 years and has been in private practice in Southern California for nearly 19 years. Dr. Pousti completed his Plastic Surgery training at Harvard with world-renowned surgeons at The Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts. As a San Diego cosmetic surgery and La Jolla plastic surgery specialist, Dr. Pousti focuses on breast surgery, body contouring, facial rejuvenation and all types of revisionary surgery, and sees patients from all over the United States and worldwide. For more information on Dr. Tom J. Pousti, MD, F.A.C.S, please visit Pousti Plastic Surgery’s website at http://www.poustiplasticsurgery.com or call (619) 466-8851.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Dr. Ben Talei of The Beverly Hills Center for Plastic & Laser Surgery is a distinguished double-board certified facial plastic surgeon who is known for his dedication to use the most natural and minimally invasive techniques available. His mission is to deliver outstanding results in facial plastic surgery that portray natural beauty as well as provide valued sustainability. His patients have certainly recognized his excellence in facial plastic and reconstructive surgery, as they have posted a number of superior reviews and five-star rating across multiple credible online sources. This has led Find Local Doctors to feature Dr. Talei as a 2017 Top Patient Rated Plastic Surgeon for Beverly Hills. Find Local Doctors is an online directory that helps consumers connect with qualified and reputable physicians in their area. Dr. Ben Talei’s plastic and reconstructive surgery practice in Beverly Hills offers a full menu of facial plastic surgery procedures and cosmetic treatments, including advanced facelift procedures, rhinoplasty, eyebrow lifts, non-surgical skin rejuvenation and more. Dr. Talei has pioneered numerous techniques in facial plastic surgery to improve patient experience, recovery and results. These include a lip lift method that offers faster healing and more natural results than past surgical methods as well as an awake and painless deep plane facelift technique that Dr. Talei calls the Auralyft. Dr. Talei is also an industry-leading physician in the field of birthmark removal surgery for babies through adults. He carries remarkable training and expertise, including a dual fellowship training in Facial Cosmetic and Reconstructive Surgery, Vascular Birthmarks and Congenital Anomalies with Laser Surgery. The practice is committed to approaching patient care with complete transparency, sincerity and honesty. “We judge our success not by how we view our outcomes but by how our patients view their results. Therefore, because this award is based on actual patient reviews it represents a significant achievement for us,” says Dr. Ben Talei of The Beverly Hills Center for Plastic & Laser Surgery. The Beverly Hills Center for Plastic & Laser Surgery is now serving patients in a new, state-of-the-art facility located at 465 N. Roxbury Drive in Beverly Hills, CA 90210. About Dr. Ben Talei:     A native of California, Dr. Benjamin Talei graduated from the University of California, Los Angeles with a degree in Physiological Sciences. He received his medical degree at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine. Dr. Talei then went on to complete his residency training in Head and Neck Surgery at Columbia University and Cornell University Medical Centers, New York Presbyterian Hospital. Following his residency program, Dr. Talei became one of the only surgeons in the country to complete two separate fellowships in Facial & Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery including a fellowship at the Vascular Birthmark Institute of New York. In addition, Dr. Talei is a respected author, speaker and humanitarian. If you would like to get more information about Dr. Ben Talei or his plastic and reconstructive surgery centers, please visit their website at beverlyhillscenter.com or call (310) 288-0641.

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