Orlando, FL, United States
Orlando, FL, United States

Time filter

Source Type

Patent
Plasmonics Inc. and University of Central Florida | Date: 2012-08-24

Infrared metamaterial arrays containing Au elements immersed in a medium of benzocyclobutene (BCB) were fabricated and selectively etched to produce small square flakes with edge dimensions of approximately 20 m. Two unit-cell designs were fabricated: one employed crossed-dipole elements while the other utilized square-loop elements.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 97.58K | Year: 2011

ABSTRACT: Fresnel-zone lens can meet many of the Air Force's requirements for conformal aperture technology including light-weight, large aperture size, and the ability to conform to a curved surface. However, aberrations limit the effective field-of-view of static Fresnel-zone lens, and the spectral performance is limited to a narrow band. A tunable Fresnel-zone lens with variable-zone-radii will able to image over a wide field-of-view by adjusting defocus to correct for off-axis aberrations and perform a spectral scan from the short-wave through the long-wave infrared. This proposal discusses materials and designs that may be used to create electronically-controlled Fresnel-zone lens without any mechanical parts. BENEFIT: The research and development in this proposal will enable light-weight tunable-optics capable of active-wavefront manipulation through focus control and higher-order compensation. This technology can have a large impact on the aerospace industry by replacing the mechanical gimbals in current systems with solid-state electronically-programmable optics.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 99.70K | Year: 2011

ABSTRACT: Electromagnetically-resonating infrared metamaterial elements may be used to control the phase of emitted radiation across a planar surface. Such a coated surface can be designed to produce a highly directional emitted wavefront from a large aperture high-angular-resolution array. Active angular control may be achieved using electronically-tunable metamaterial elements. Like all phased-array devices, the spectral response of the metamaterial array is inherently narrow band, but electronic tuning can allow the device to operate at wavelengths across the long-wave or mid-wave infrared. A metamaterial-populated surface is a patterned thin-film coating that adds almost no mass to the application. Such a surface may also be made to be environmentally ruggadized. Furthermore, thermally sensitive materials may be incorporated to direct heat away from hot-spots. BENEFIT: Directional control of thermal emission is of interest to the Air Force for space platforms. Further commercial applications include infrared-energy harvesting and related infrared active optical systems. Infrared energy harvesting has many potential applications, and is especially attractive for applications where low power is required and collection of solar energy is not feasible. Due to their light-weight, electronically-controlled active infrared optical systems have a variety of aerospace applications.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 749.19K | Year: 2013

ABSTRACT: Under the first phase of the program, Plasmonics Inc. and Sandia National Laboratories investigated a range of surfaces that yield non-Lambertian emission profiles in the thermal infrared. The second phase of this program will further maturate the designs developed in the first phase of the program. With the vast majority of the analytical work complete, focus in the second phase will be placed on design fabrication and testing. It is strongly desirable to work with AFRL to target specific design metrics and platforms to focus on development of a practical prototype. The final goal for the second phase will be the deliverable of a directional emission surface for testing. BENEFIT: Thermal management remains a critical challenge for space, air, and terrestrial vehicles. The proposed technology provides a means to minimize surface emission as well as minimize surface loading from external thermal sources. A potential application for these surfaces includes mounting them on a satellite to maintain a high degree of thermal emissivity, but using their absorption directivity to selectively reject heat loading from the sun or earthshine.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 99.42K | Year: 2012

The research and development proposed here will examine using sparse-linear-detector-array configurations to lower the power consumption of personnel detection sensors. Plasmonics will design and test a bread board LWIR pyroelectric sensor to show that detector arrays with sufficient sensitivity to meet the application needs can be built. Optical systems that can reliably detect and classify humans out to a range of 300 m will also be designed to establish feasibility. The goal of the project is to create a sparse detector array that can achieve sufficient range and resolution to detect and classify humans without the need for a power consuming ROIC. Packaging of such a detector array will be designed and investigated in Phase I.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 940.63K | Year: 2014

In the first phase of this program Plasmonics was able to make a breadboard profile sensor using COTS optics and a pyroelectric-linear-detector array that was able to detect a human by subtending greater than 16 pixels across the target at a range of up to 75 m. Based on work in Phase I, it was concluded that the design of existing COTS linear-detector arrays was insufficient to achieve a range of 300 m in a profile sensor. It was determined that this limitation in the COTS arrays was due to the size of the pixels and the insufficient thermal isolation of the pixels. The existing linear arrays are designed for spectroscopy rather than imaging. A pyroelectric-detector array that overcomes these limitations was designed in Phase I. A sparse-array configuration that uses fewer pixels than COTS arrays, and thus has lower power consumption, was also designed. In Phase II complete prototype sensors using these designs will be built and tested.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 713.01K | Year: 2013

Feasibility of the microbolometer detectors using novel thin film materials was proven in Phase I. Phase II will continue these efforts by producing packaged sensors that are designed to function in PFx systems for persistent ISR applications. In order to provide a low unit cost, high sensitivity, sensor component source, Phase II R & D efforts will focus on improving the sensitivity and response time of the microbolometer elements developed in Phase I. At the same time, Plasmonics Inc will continue to provide the Army with regular shipments of packaged sensor elements that may be used in field tests and for PFx prototype units during Phase II. Plasmonics Inc will work with the Army and their contractors to integrate the sensors built in Phase II with existing platforms. Work to improve process yield and volume capabilities will also be made in preparation for Phase III.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 99.55K | Year: 2015

We propose to use metamaterial films to produce flakes for aerosolized obscurants which can have narrow-band transmission windows. We will focus our initial efforts on the visible and SWIR range, but the technique can be extended into out to the LWIR as needed. This effort will proceed with the analytical and computational design of the metamaterial structures which can provide extinction on the order of 4.5 m^2/g for broadband radiation while allowing narrow passbands. We will synthesize a moderate quantity of flakes in Phase I for testing and proof of feasibility.


When using micro-resonant structures, a resonant structure may be turned on or off (e.g., when a display element is turned on or off in response to a changing image or when a communications switch is turned on or off to send data different data bits). Rather than turning the charged particle beam on and off, the beam may be moved to a position that does not excite the resonant structure, thereby turning off the resonant structure without having to turn off the charged particle beam. In one such embodiment, at least one deflector is placed between a source of charged particles and the resonant structure(s) to be excited. When the resonant structure is to be turned on (i.e., excited), the at least one deflector allows the beam to pass by undeflected. When the resonant structure is to be turned off, the at least one deflector deflects the beam away from the resonant structure by an amount sufficient to prevent the resonant structure from becoming excited.


When using micro-resonant structures, a resonant structure may be turned on or off (e.g., when a display element is turned on or off in response to a changing image or when a communications switch is turned on or off to send data different data bits). Rather than turning the charged particle beam on and off, the beam may be moved to a position that does not excite the resonant structure, thereby turning off the resonant structure without having to turn off the charged particle beam. In one such embodiment, at least one deflector is placed between a source of charged particles and the resonant structure(s) to be excited. When the resonant structure is to be turned on (i.e., excited), the at least one deflector allows the beam to pass by undeflected. When the resonant structure is to be turned off, the at least one deflector deflects the beam away from the resonant structure by an amount sufficient to prevent the resonant structure from becoming excited.

Loading Plasmonics Inc. collaborators
Loading Plasmonics Inc. collaborators