Plant Resources Research Institute

Seoul Korea, South Korea

Plant Resources Research Institute

Seoul Korea, South Korea
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Jang M.,Plant Resources Research Institute | Kim G.-H.,Korea Food Research Institute
Journal of Food Safety | Year: 2017

In this study, the antimicrobial activities of four thioflavones against foodborne and food spoilage bacteria (Three Gram-positive and Five Gram-negative bacteria) and one fungus were assessed. Antimicrobial effects of the thioflavones were evaluated using broth micro-dilution and agar dilution assays. We generated survival curves based on the kinetics of bacterial inactivation after 24 hr of thioflavone exposure. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) for the microorganisms tested were 8-120 μg/mL. The minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC) were 60-120 μg/mL. We evaluated three novel thioflavone derivatives and found that they exhibited strong antimicrobial activities against most of the microorganisms tested. In an in vivo antifungal study, thioflavone treatments reduced fungal decay, and 4'-chloro-thioflavone at a concentration of 120 μg/mL showed complete control of Rhizopus sp. in wound-inoculated fruit. Practical applications: There is an urgent need for the development of new classes of antimicrobial compounds and the new thioflavone derivatives represent such a development. Thioflavones are sulfur-containing flavones that inhibit the growth of foodborne pathogens and food spoilage microorganisms. Foodborne spoilage by bacteria or fungi cause postharvest decay and rapid deterioration, which affects the quality and shortens the shelf life of fruits and vegetables. We believe that these new thioflavone derivatives provide a viable alternative as a food preservative can extend shelf life of fruits and vegetables. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Lee J.H.,Plant Resources Research Institute | Jang M.,Plant Resources Research Institute | Seo J.,Plant Resources Research Institute | Kim G.H.,Plant Resources Research Institute | Kim G.H.,Duksung Womens University
Journal of Food Safety | Year: 2011

The antimicrobial activities of C. indicum-essential oil and its components (thujone, chrysanthemyl alcohol, camphor, and γ-terpinene) were examined with ten food-borne pathogens. C. indicum-essential oil showed the potent inhibition of growth for Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Aeromonas hydrophila, Salmonella choleraesuis, Shigella sonnei and Vibrio parahaemolyticus. MIC values for C. indicum-essential oil were found to be the range of 1.25-10μg/mL, and C. indicum-essential oil inhibited very effectively the growth of B. cereus, S. aureus, A. hydrophilia, S. choleraesuis, S. enterica, S. sonnei, V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus. MBC values of C. indicum-essential oil was declined as the following order; A. hydrophilia


Jang M.,Plant Resources Research Institute | Hong E.,Duksung Womens University | Kim G.-H.,Duksung Womens University
Journal of Food Science | Year: 2010

This study investigated antibacterial activities of 4 isothiocyanates (3-butenyl, 4-phentenyl, 2-phenylethyl, and benzyl isothiocyanate) against 4 Gram-positive bacteria (Bacillus cereus, Bacillus subtilis, Listeria monocytogenes, and Staphylococcus aureus) and 7 Gram-negative bacteria (Aeromonas hydrophila, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella choleaesuis, Salmonella enterica, Serratia marcescens, Shigella sonnei, and Vibrio parahaemolyticus) by an agar disc diffusion assay. Benzyl isothiocyanate (> 90.00 mm inhibition zone diameter at 0.1 μL/mL) and 2-phenylethyl isothiocyanate (58.33 mm at 0.2 μL/mL) showed large inhibition zones especially against B. cereus. Also, 3-butenyl isothiocyanate (21.67 mm at 1.0 μL/mL) and 4-pentenyl isothiocyanate (19.67 mm at 1.0 μL/mL) displayed potent antibacterial activity against A. hydrophila. Benzyl and 2-phenylethyl isothiocyanate indicated higher activity against most of the pathogenic bacteria than 3-butenyl and 4-pentenyl isothiocyanate, and were more effective against Gram-positive bacteria than Gram-negative bacteria. © 2010 Institute of Food Technologists®.

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