Plant Protection and Soil Conservation Directorate

Kecskemét, Hungary

Plant Protection and Soil Conservation Directorate

Kecskemét, Hungary
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Szabo A.,Corvinus University of Budapest | Ripka G.,Central Agricultural Office | Hajdu Z.,Corvinus University of Budapest | Tempfli B.,Corvinus University of Budapest | And 5 more authors.
Acta Phytopathologica et Entomologica Hungarica | Year: 2013

The authors give account of 7 new species, viz. Proctolaelaps striatus (Westerboer, 1963), Hypoaspiskargi Costa, 1968, Hypoaspis fishtowni Ruf and Köhler, 1993, Neoseiulus zwölferi (Dosse, 1957), Euseiusstipulatus (Athias-Henriot, 1960), Neoseiulus subtilisetosus (Beglyarov, 1962), Neoseiulus pepperi (Specht, 1968) belonging to the order Mesostigmata, which have not been recorded so far in the Hungarian fauna.


Szabo A.,Corvinus University of Budapest | Penzes B.,Corvinus University of Budapest | Sipos P.,Eurofins | Hegyi T.,Plant Protection and Soil Conservation Directorate | And 2 more authors.
Experimental and Applied Acarology | Year: 2014

We examined the faunal composition and abundance of phytoseiid mites (Acari: Phytoseiidae) in apple orchards under different pest management systems in Hungary. A total of 30 apple orchards were surveyed, including abandoned and organic orchards and orchards where integrated pest management (IPM) or broad spectrum insecticides (conventional pest management) were applied. A total of 18 phytoseiid species were found in the canopy of apple trees. Species richness was greatest in the organic orchards (mean: 3.3 species/400 leaves) and the least in the conventional orchards (1.4), with IPM (2.1) and abandoned (2.7) orchards showing intermediate values. The phytoseiid community's Rényi diversity displayed a similar pattern. However, the total phytoseiid abundance in the orchards with different pest management systems did not differ, with abundance varying between 1.8 and 2.6 phytoseiids/10 leaves. Amblyseius andersoni, Euseius finlandicus, and Typhlodromus pyri were the three most common species. The relative abundance of A. andersoni increased with the pesticide load of the orchards whereas the relative abundance of E. finlandicus decreased. The abundance of T. pyri did not change in the apple orchards under different pest management strategies; regardless of the type of applied treatment, they only displayed greater abundance in five of the orchards. The remaining 15 phytoseiid species only occurred in small numbers, mostly from the abandoned and organic orchards. We identified a negative correlation between the abundance of T. pyri and the other phytoseiids in the abandoned and organic orchards. However, we did not find any similar link between the abundance of A. andersoni and E. finlandicus. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.


Ripka G.,Plant Protection and Soil Conservation Directorate | Szabo A.,Corvinus University of Budapest
Acta Phytopathologica et Entomologica Hungarica | Year: 2010

Authors give a report on the recent results of mite collectings made mainly between 2003 and 2009 on ornamental trees and shrubs, on streets, in parks, in forests, in botanical gardens, private gardens and in orchards in various localities of Hungary. This survey also covers material collected in a winter barley and winter wheat field by Malaise-trap and from imported plant consignment. Representatives of 13 families were identified. Out of 31 mite species Arctoseius longispinosus (Hirschmann), Eutogenes frater Volgin, Hypoaspis mixta Shcherbak, Kampimodromus corylosus Kolodochka, Parasitus americanus (Berlese) and Proctolaelaps scolyti Evans are new for the Hungarian fauna.


Toth M.,HAS Plant Protection Institute | Torocsik G.,PA ME BT | Imrei Z.,HAS Plant Protection Institute | Vorors G.,Plant Protection and Soil Conservation Directorate
Acta Phytopathologica et Entomologica Hungarica | Year: 2010

Western corn rootworm (WCR) ( Diabrotica v. virgifera Le Conte) (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae) adults were attracted only during daytime hours and showed a bimodal diel activity pattern when responding to the synthetic floral bait in the field. On the other hand, to the synthetic pheromone bait, good responses were recorded apart from daytime hours also well into the night. The present results suggest that in WCR the pheromonal communication channel and the channel connected with feeding (= floral lure) are separated.

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